Category: New Posts

r960-16e45271d0173665811f58cfc0d3dce9.jpg

78,000 military email accounts found in adult website hack


At least 78,000 dot-mil email addresses and 5,650 dot-gov addresses were stolen from Friends Finder Network. (iStock Photo)

Tens of thousands of government and military-issued email addresses were among those stolen from a conglomeration of adult hookup and pornography sites last month, according to an analysis of the breach issued Monday by LeakedSource.com.

At least 78,000 dot-mil email addresses and 5,650 dot-gov addresses were stolen from Friends Finder Network, which includes AdultFriendFinder.com, porn site Penthouse.com, and live streams Stripshow.com and Cams.com.

“A large number of them should be real if the Ashley Madison breach is any indication,” Leaked Source told NextGov.com, referring to the 2015 hacking of a site that facilitates affairs. It is possible that others are fake. For example, the company said if President Obama’s email address was registered, it probably was not the actual commander-in-chief signing up, but someone who knew the address and did it as a prank.

The company has not yet combed through the government email addresses to confirm the validity of each and the leaked information will remain private and unavailable to the public, unlike the Ashley Madison ordeal.



Nearly 6 million people could be affected by the breach. It’s unlikely that bank or credit card information of users was hacked.

Media ready for Trump to fail

Top Story

The national media that misread Trump’s popularity are now anticipating his likely failures.

11/15/16 12:01 AM

Subscribe to Alerts

Learn more about Washington Examiner’s Alerts

Loading Next Article



Source link

r960-d80ab335aa7ab0138a506d897577644c.jpg

Republicans gird for a midterm with Trump, not Obama, at helm


Republicans are girding for a midterm election cycle without President Obama to use as a convenient foil in the fight for seats in Congress.

Voter dissatisfaction with Obama in 2010 and 2014 propelled the GOP to historic majorities in the House, and a combined 15 Senate seats.

But President-elect Trump presents a challenge the Republicans haven’t faced since 2006: defending majorities with their man in the White House.

Steven Law, the chief strategist for the GOP super PAC that invested $165 million in Senate races in 2016, said the new environment requires his party to adjust accordingly.

“It’s certainly a more complicated environment. Just as Donald Trump was a critical factor in helping us preserve our majority, he’ll be a key part of what voters have in mind two years from now,” said Law, who oversees Senate Leadership Fund, the super PAC aligned with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.

“Republicans who have gotten a lot of mileage out of running against Barack Obama are going to have to develop some new skills as we head into the 2018 cycle,” Law added, during a wide-ranging interview on Monday with the Washington Examiner.

Many Republicans considering their 2018 prospects had assumed that Hillary Clinton would defeat Trump, leading to political atmospherics would set up nicely for the GOP two years later. Now, they’re in a wait-and-see mode.

A prominent Republican leaning toward a 2018 Senate bid before Trump was elected now plans to hold off until at least after the first quarter of next year, this individual’s chief adviser told the Examiner.

This potential candidate wants to see how the Trump presidency unfolds to better gauge how voters react to the Republican Party’s full control of Washington, and whether they’re inclined to rebuke or reward the president and his party in the midterm elections.

Was Trump the only Republican who could have won this year?

Also from the Washington Examiner

Trump may have been the only Republican contender who could have broken Clinton’s blue wall.

11/15/16 1:23 AM

“The bottom could drop out very quickly and suddenly we are in a typical midterm posture where it is hard for the party that controls the White House to win seats,” this adviser said, on condition of anonymity in order to speak candidly.

Senate Leadership Fund, formed at the behest of McConnell, just completed its first election cycle, and is run by Law and a tight-knit group of strategists, including veteran GOP consultant Carl Forti.

Law previously worked for McConnell and the two are longtime political allies; he has what he describes as a “mind-meld” relationship with the Senate majority leader when it comes to political strategy. Law credited the closeness of their relationship with the success Senate Leadership Fund experienced in its first two years.

Now, however, Law is preparing for a new political landscape in which Trump drives the Republican policy agenda and political messaging.

It will be an adjustment for the Republicans, who since 2008 have had the luxury of defining themselves, often against the backdrop of deep disapproval with Obama and his policies. Law isn’t necessarily assuming that the change in circumstances will negatively impact the GOP in 2018.

Conservatives push bill to speed repeal of Obama legacy

Also from the Washington Examiner

It’s an important law, given that Obama is expected to issue a slew of last-minute “midnight” rules.

11/15/16 12:29 AM

“Trump’s late surge was a critical factor in preserving our majority,” he said, of the 2016 elections, in which the GOP, widely projected to lose its majority to the Democrats, hung on by winning in a handful of critical swing states.

Law said the super PAC will spend the next several weeks reviewing what went right in 2016, and ways in which the group can improve its performance over the next two years.

Elements that added to Senate Leadership Fund’s success included the network of donors cultivated and developed; their reliance on a political strategy that relied on data analytics and their own, homegrown voter files; and a willingness to pick sides in competitive GOP primaries on the side of the candidate deemed most electable.

Law said the super PAC’s strategy was validated by the results in Indiana, where they supported Republican Rep. Todd Young, who went on to defeat Democrat Evan Bayh.

Law said that Senate Leadership Fund would continue to reserve the right to play in GOP primaries, even if that means the group is at odds with Trump’s White House political operation.

“That’s the advantage of being an independent group, we can call our own plays in that regard,” Law said. “Certainly, there’s an inevitable tension that always exists and something that we would want to be sensitive to. But in end it’s in everybody’s best interest, from president on down, to elect an enduring majority.”

It’s too early to predict the political environment that will govern the outcome of an election two years away.

In 1998 and 2002, under Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, respectively, the party in power in the White House bucked the pattern and actually picked up seats Congress. But 2010 turned out to be equally unpredictable.

The assumption after Obama’s convincing victory in 2008 — a second consecutive wave election for the Democrats — was that Republicans were hopelessly relegated to minority status in the House. Their numbers in the chamber were at a historic low.

In the House, Republicans controlled just 178 seats, 40 short of a majority. In the Senate, they held just 41, and months later Sen. Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania would leave the party and deliver to the Democrats a filibuster-proof majority.

Indeed, the 2010 map initially looked so bleak for the Republicans, as several seats were up for election in Democratic strongholds, that it was assumed the Democrats would push well past 60 seats and secure supermajority status for the foreseeable future.

Republicans ended up picking up 63 House seats and six Senate seats, an enormous swing in power fueled by anxiety over high unemployment and the Affordable Care Act healthcare overhaul.

That’s the cautionary tale for Republicans who assume the favorable 2018 Senate map guarantees protection against public dissatisfaction with Trump’s leadership that could emerge with full GOP control of Washington.

Republicans are eying Democrat-held seats in Indiana, Michigan, Missouri, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, all states won by Trump last week.

“Having the White House almost always aids recruitment,” Law said. “I think a lot of Republicans are going to feel that the wind is at our back, with opportunities to shape our destiny a little bit more.”

Media ready for Trump to fail

Top Story

The national media that misread Trump’s popularity are now anticipating his likely failures.

11/15/16 12:01 AM



Source link

r960-8282bd7755b8310e0df401d6eef6018f.jpg

Three House lawmakers sworn in just before Congress ends


House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., swore in three new members into the House of Representatives on Monday to finish up the last few weeks of Congress before a new one reconvenes early next year.

Reps. James Comer, R-Ky.; Dwight Evans, D-Pa., and Colleen Hanabusa, D-Hawaii, won special elections on Election Day to fill vacancies in the current Congress, which could end as soon as this week.

Comer takes over for former GOP Rep. Ed Whitfield, who resigned in September amid an internal ethics investigation. Evans replaces former Democratic Rep. Chaka Fattah, who resigned in June after being convicted of corruption. And Hanabusa assumes the unexpired term of the-late Democratic Rep. Mark Takai, who died of cancer over the summer.

“I may be new to this process; I am not new to working together,” Evans said on the House floor after swearing his oath.

House Republican leaders are under pressure from conservatives to adjourn the 114th Congress as quickly as possible so as to leave major decisions to the new Congress when it is seated Jan. 3.

Lawmakers returned to Washington from a seven-week recess Monday afternoon. If Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., opt to pass only a short-term spending bill to keep the government funded past Dec. 9, when the current stopgap measure expires, they theoretically could wrap up work this week.

More likely, Congress will return from next week’s Thanksgiving recess on Nov. 28 for at least one more week of work, which would make the trio’s current term less than a month.

Media ready for Trump to fail

Top Story

The national media that misread Trump’s popularity are now anticipating his likely failures.

11/15/16 12:01 AM



Source link

r960-530e0295ad3a551aba0429ac12257203.jpg

Media ready for Trump to fail


Five days after Donald Trump was elected the next president, the national media that misread his popularity are now anticipating his likely failures and shortcomings.

And he hasn’t even made it into office yet.

Though the president elect will be sworn in to work with a Republican House and Senate, Politico Playbook, a Washington tip-sheet popular among political journalists, said in Monday’s edition, “We bet several of Trump’s key planks will fall flat on their face.”

The tip-sheet said Trump’s proposal for term limits won’t go anywhere and that his remark the previous evening in a “60 Minutes” interview, wherein he said he wants to “phase out” lobbyist influence, “doesn’t make any sense.”

Much of Trump’s appeal throughout the election centered on his status as an outsider with no political experience. Though he was routinely criticized for running a barebones campaign and avoiding policy minutia – the things the national media and Washington veterans emphasize – he still took big chunks of the electoral college map and took some states that Republicans hadn’t won in decades.

Politico’s Glenn Thrush, remarking on Trump’s transition to the White House, said in an analysis piece, “This is what winging it looks like, America. Donald Trump is compulsively improvisational, and ran the most successful back-of-the-napkin operation in American political history, but the challenge confronting him is, by his own admission, nothing like anything anybody has ever faced.”

Thrush added, “Trump is nervous — and he should be.”

Last Thursday, Politics editor at the National Journal Josh Kraushaar imagined Trump’s coming administration appointments, which so far have included Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus as White House chief of staff and Breitbart News Chairman Steve Bannon as a special adviser.

“The ultimate con is that Trump Cabinet will probably be a lot more establishment/pragmatic than anyone realizes,” said Kraushaar on Twitter.

Was Trump the only Republican who could have won this year?

Also from the Washington Examiner

Trump may have been the only Republican contender who could have broken Clinton’s blue wall.

11/15/16 1:23 AM

At his campaign rallies and in interviews, Trump frequently targeted the news media as “unfair” and suggested at one point that as president, he would “open up” libel laws to make it easier to sue news outlets.

New York Times media columnist Jim Rutenberg said Sunday night that the national press may be in for “very grim days,” if Trump maintains his aggressive posture.

“Imagine what somebody with a press vendetta and a dim view of the First Amendment would do with that kind of power [of the presidency],” he said.

On the Times’ op-ed page, columnist and economist Paul Krugman also expected catastrophe under Trump, but cautioned that it will take a while for the public to notice.

“[W]ill the extent of the disaster become apparent right away?” he wrote Monday. “It’s natural and, one must admit, tempting to predict a quick comeuppance — and I myself gave in to that temptation, briefly, on that horrible election night, suggesting that a global recession was imminent. But I quickly retracted that call. Trumpism will have dire effects, but they will take time to become manifest.”

Conservatives push bill to speed repeal of Obama legacy

Also from the Washington Examiner

It’s an important law, given that Obama is expected to issue a slew of last-minute “midnight” rules.

11/15/16 12:29 AM

The Washington Post’s business columnist Jim Samuelson said nearly as much Sunday. He said Trump’s economic plan is largely based on a combination of reduced taxes, infrastructure spending and regulation cutting, and cast doubt on whether Trump could actually effect any change.

“Under the most favorable circumstances, Trump’s big plan — his quest for faster economic growth — would be a daunting task” due to all kinds of “uncertainty,” said Samuelson. “Under realistic circumstances, it could be mission impossible.”

Though it appears Democrat Hillary Clinton won the popular vote in the election, once California’s votes are fully counted, it will likely have only been by a couple of percentage points.

Still, Friday on HBO’s “Real Time,” New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman said Trump’s victory was America’s “moral 9/11.”

Transition team: No secret clearances sought for Trump's kids

Top Story

The president-elect did not request top secret security clearances for his three adult children.

11/14/16 9:53 PM



Source link

r960-f5b95786e0932400cd367d974d9de5f2.jpg

Was Trump the only Republican who could have won this year?


The conventional wisdom was that almost any of the other 16 Republican presidential candidates could have run better than Donald Trump. Hillary Clinton’s team certainly believed it.

Now that Trump is president-elect, not only was his weakness clearly exaggerated. With the benefit of hindsight, Trump may have been the only Republican contender who could have broken Clinton’s blue wall and pulled off the upset.

“I wouldn’t have believed it,” said a D.C. anti-Trump conservative. “Now it sure seems like it.”

Consider Trump’s unlikely path to a majority in the Electoral College. Trump held on to every state Mitt Romney won in 2012 and managed to flip perennial battleground Florida into the Republican column. But the real difference-maker was Trump’s strong performance in the industrial Midwest, giving him Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Iowa and likely Michigan.

When all is said and done, Trump will probably receive 306 electoral votes. Which of his primary opponents could have accomplished what House Speaker Paul Ryan described as an “enormous” and “incredible political feat” by replicating his huge rural white voter turnout or replacing it with other voting blocs?

Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio might have put a dent in Clinton’s popular vote margin by running ahead of Trump in the red states. Cruz probably would have done better than Trump in Texas; Rubio almost certainly would improved on Trump’s showing in Florida, since he ran 6.4 points ahead of the GOP presidential standard-bearer in the state while seeking a second Senate term.

There would have been no Evan McMullin challenge in Utah, where the independent conservative received more than a fifth of the vote. Presumably, Cruz, Rubio or any number of other Republicans could have kept some of the GOP votes that went to Libertarian Gary Johnson rather than Trump.

None of that matters much, however, because the popular vote doesn’t determine the presidential election winner and Trump carried all the red states even if he under-performed in them. From an Electoral College perspective, it doesn’t matter whether you win Utah by 50 points or 0.5.

Only two states award electoral votes by congressional district. Trump swept Nebraska’s electoral votes and picked up an extra one in Maine’s second congressional district. Trump maxed out on Republican-leaning electoral votes.

Conservatives push bill to speed repeal of Obama legacy

Also from the Washington Examiner

It’s an important law, given that Obama is expected to issue a slew of last-minute “midnight” rules.

11/15/16 12:29 AM

It is harder to imagine the others candidates winning Wisconsin, Michigan or even Pennsylvania, none of which had voted Republican since Ronald Reagan was president.

Trump won non-college whites by nearly 40 points, including nearly three out of four white men without college degrees. He carried three Pennsylvania counties that went for Barack Obama in 2012. He did better than Romney in 58 of Pennsylvania’s 67 counties while Clinton did worse than in Obama in 65 of them.

“Mainstream Romney-Ryan conservatism, with its platform of deregulation, free trade and tax cuts isn’t popular with these voters,” said George Hawley, an assistant professor of political science at the University of Alabama, questioning whether it was popular enough in the country as a whole. Hawley made headlines for correctly predicting the presidential results in 48 out of 50 states.

Take away Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Michigan and the Republican presidential ticket is down to 260 electoral votes. Subtract Ohio and the number falls to 242. Where would a non-Trump Republican make this up?

Rubio might have competed better than Trump in Virginia and Colorado. He won the Republican caucuses in Minnesota, a state Trump came close to carrying last week. Cruz’s path to 270 looks even narrower, with Florida, Virginia and Colorado all being tougher slogs.

Seven moves Obama could make on the way out the door

Also from the Washington Examiner

Here are seven ways Obama could try to salvage his policy plans before Jan. 20, 2017.

11/15/16 12:01 AM

“In the Sunbelt, the Republican senators pulled Trump across the finish line,” said Republican strategist Ford O’Connell. “In the Rush Belt, he helped pull some of them across the finish line.”

Hawley pointed out that while Trump’s 58 percent of the white vote was actually slightly less than Romney’s national share, the 2016 nominee increased his percentage of the white vote in the states where it mattered most. The states where his share declined or held steady were mostly already safely red or blue.

Absent Trump’s Rust Belt appeal, O’Connell argued that the party’s next best bet in the Electoral College might have been Rubio and Ohio Sen. Rob Portman, who won re-election in a landslide.

One other 2016 Republican contender who might have been able to pull it off: John Kasich. The two-term Ohio governor would have been able to win his home state. Maybe he could have made a play in Pennsylvania, where he was born, and Michigan, though it should be noted that he tried to do so during the GOP primaries and failed.

“John always looks better on paper,” said O’Connell.

Either way, Kasich did not position himself well to make it out of the Republican primaries and only ended up winning Ohio.

Maybe another Republican candidate could have paved some other path to an electoral majority, but it is by no means obvious.

Whether Trump can be a model for future Republican candidates, or could even pull it off a second time himself, is still up in the air.

“We don’t know yet if Trumpism is a sustainable long-term electoral solution [for Republicans],” Hawley said. “It just worked better than a traditional Republican campaign this year.”

Media ready for Trump to fail

Top Story

The national media that misread Trump’s popularity are now anticipating his likely failures.

11/15/16 12:01 AM



Source link

r960-a4f3a75ec69a30a7a49b198bbff1d587.jpg

Seven moves Obama could make on the way out the door


President Obama may have given up on his signature trade legislation, but with President-elect Donald Trump waiting in the wings, White House observers say Obama still has ways to push through parts of his unfinished agenda, and might just try it.

“There are presidents who, when they are lame ducks, attempt to cement their agenda through executive actions,” said John Malcolm, director of the Heritage Foundation’s Edwin Meese III Center for Legal and Judicial Studies.

“He doesn’t really have much time to go through the formal rulemaking process … so anything he would attempt to do would have to be in the form of executive orders,” Malcolm added.

The White House has already signaled its intention to drop the Trans Pacific Partnership, a massive trade deal that Obama struggled to sell to members of his own party. He will address the fate of TPP during an economic summit this week in Peru.



But Obama could attempt to implement his other policy priorities through whatever means available in the coming nine weeks. The Democratic president has proven himself a willing executor of executive authority when Congress has obstructed his agenda in the past.

Adam Brandon, CEO of conservative advocacy group FreedomWorks, said his organization has long worried about Obama’s possible use of “midnight regulations,” or policies rammed into place at the end of a president’s term.

“With this election result, a lot of what we feared, even if he does it, the ink won’t be dry before Trump could undo it all,” Brandon said.

Obama indicated Monday that he intends to forge ahead with his blueprint until the day Trump attends his inauguration. Here are seven ways Obama could try to salvage his policy plans before Jan. 20, 2017.

Syrian refugees

Conservatives push bill to speed repeal of Obama legacy

Also from the Washington Examiner

It’s an important law, given that Obama is expected to issue a slew of last-minute “midnight” rules.

11/15/16 12:29 AM

Obama could approve a surge of Syrian refugees in the waning weeks of his presidency now that he can’t count on a Clinton administration to carry out his push for the resettlement of 110,000 refugees to the U.S. in 2017.

“The refugees [policy area] is where he can probably have the most permanent impact, because once you let the refugee in, we’re not going to be un-refugeeing them and sending them out,” said Mark Krikorian, executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies.

“So conceivably they could accelerate the arrival of Syrian refugees,” Krikorian said. “They’ve been doing that anyway by cutting short the vetting time, the time they spend screening them.”

Trump has called for the complete suspension of immigration from countries that harbor Islamic terrorists until the government can get a handle on the screening process, which Republicans have characterized as inadequate.

Labor regulations

Media ready for Trump to fail

Also from the Washington Examiner

The national media that misread Trump’s popularity are now anticipating his likely failures and shortcomings.

11/15/16 12:01 AM

In May, Obama issued an executive order expanding overtime pay to millions of salaried workers.

It wasn’t the first time the president used his authority to pursue a labor-related agenda.

“The National Labor Relations Board and the Department of Labor have been incredibly aggressive in terms of enacting his agenda and, perhaps, the most aggressive department and agency under his administration,” Malcolm said.

He noted the president could still issue orders on wages, overtime hours, union rules or “card check,” an organizing tactic that gives workers an easier way to form unions.

Pardons

The White House has already avoided the question of whether Obama will grant an outgoing pardon to Hillary Clinton for her alleged mishandling of classified material, and any future indictments stemming from a separate FBI inquiry into whether her family’s foundation peddled influence while she served as secretary of state.

Although there would be few policy implications attached to a Clinton pardon — aside from the precedent it would set — Obama could face a fierce backlash if he chose to spare Trump’s political rival from consequences on his way out the door.

It could also lead to other questions about whether the president would also pardon Huma Abedin, Cheryl Mills, Anthony Weiner, Terry McAuliffe and other Clinton allies who have come under scrutiny by the FBI this year for various related offenses.

Obama could theoretically use his pardon privilege for anyone he chooses. It’s an authority that has come back to haunt presidents in the past.

President Bill Clinton’s reputation took a hit when, on his way out of Washington, he pardoned major Democratic donor Marc Rich after well-paid insiders pleaded the financier’s case.

Commutations

Obama has also ramped up the number of commutations, or reduced criminal sentences, he has issued in the final months of his administration.

Many have been for nonviolent drug offenses.

The president has pushed for sentencing reform legislation in Congress, but like many of his policy goals, it is unlikely to become law during the lame duck session.

Obama has commuted 944 sentences to date, more than the commutations of the 11 presidents combined.

Palestine

The U.S. has a longstanding policy of opposing, in the United Nations General Assembly, any resolutions that are unfriendly to Israel.

But critics have worried that Obama could use his final weeks in office to allow the UN Security Council to vote on a resolution that creates a recognized Palestinian state or condemns Israel’s settlements on disputed land.

In September, 88 senators from both parties urged Obama to veto any “one-sided” resolution that might emerge before he leaves office.

Trump, who promised during the campaign to repair what he characterized as a damaged U.S.-Israel relationship, would not support such moves in the UN.

Guantanamo Bay

Closing Guantanamo Bay, where the U.S. detains prisoners accused of terrorism, was a key plank of Obama’s campaign platform eight years ago.

The president is unlikely to close the prison in what remains of his final term. However, he has reduced its occupants by transferring or releasing dozens of detainees, some of whom have re-joined the battlefield.

“With respect to Guantanamo, it is true that I have not been able to close the darn thing because of the congressional restrictions that have been placed on us,” Obama told reporters Monday at the White House.

“What is also true is we have greatly reduced the population. You now have significantly less than 100 people there,” he added.

Obama hinted that his administration may try to remove additional prisoners from the facility before Trump comes to town.

“There are some additional transfers that may be taking place over next the two months,” he said.

Environmental rules

Obama’s Environmental Protection Agency has been active throughout his presidency in issuing rules and regulations that his White House has touted as necessities in the fight against climate change.

Businesses have frequently complained that the rules create an undue regulatory burden on even routine operations.

Defending an international climate accord recently struck in Paris against Trump’s pledge to pull out of it has already emerged as one of his lame-duck priorities. Obama could still push through environmental orders in the twilight of his presidency.

For example, the EPA has already announced steps toward new rules on methane emissions that would punish companies for methane leaks from existing oil rigs, not just new ones. Obama could attempt to finalize that rule, among others, before he leaves office.

Media ready for Trump to fail

Top Story

The national media that misread Trump’s popularity are now anticipating his likely failures.

11/15/16 12:01 AM



Source link

r960-23e53fdf78ac73d881011698000ab77b.jpg

Gingrich: People read Bannon's Breitbart 'out of amusement'


Newt Gingrich defended President-elect Trump's appointment of campaign chairman Steve Bannon. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich defended President-elect Trump’s appointment of campaign chairman Steve Bannon to chief strategist by downplaying controversial stories Breitbart has published.

Some have worried that Breitbart’s sometimes contentious stories and columns are indicative of the company chairman’s views and that Trump’s allowing Bannon into the White House could undo changes President Obama has made.

“There’s a big difference between the kind of stuff they did at Breitbart, which was designed to attract audiences and was actually very successful, and lots of people tuned it partly out of amusement,” Gingrich told Fox News host Megyn Kelly. “It’s like reading the Daily Mail every day from England – I mean there’s all kind of stuff there and you keep finding yourself doing it.”

Gingrich said he and his wife Callista have known Bannon for a long time and that his decision to accept a spot in the Trump administration stemmed out of concern “that Washington has grown corrupt, way too large as a government, [and] a threat to our liberties.”

Bannon’s reputation as a fighter was just the kind of person Trump needs on his team, Gingrich added.

Clinton tells House Democrats: 'No one is sorrier than me'

Top Story

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said “our hearts are broken but our determination is deepened.”

11/14/16 6:01 PM

Subscribe to Alerts

Learn more about Washington Examiner’s Alerts

Loading Next Article



Source link

r960-570f8cc98552dce331d48d2dd6adcbcc.jpg

Conservatives push bill to speed repeal of Obama legacy


House conservatives will push a proposal Tuesday in their meeting with newly elected GOP lawmakers aimed at expediting the repeal of President Obama’s executive orders, memorandum and regulations after President-elect Trump’s victory.

Rep. Ken Buck, R-Colo., a vocal member of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, plans to offer a bill that would change House rules to require that the House spend time each week on single-subject bills.

The goal is to ensure that the GOP majority has built in time each week to systematically take up measures to overturn some of Obama’s most controversial regulations and executive orders.

“We’ve had eight years of executive overreach, and I think Congress needs to focus on Article I power,” he told the Washington Examiner, referring to the section in the Constitution that gives lawmaking power exclusively to Congress. “I think it’s important that Congress lead this effort to restore Article I power.”

Unlike the two-thirds vote required for non-controversial “Suspension Calendar” votes, the “Article I Calendar” that Buck’s measure would create would require a simple majority for passage after a ten-minute debate for each piece of legislation considered, the same time floor amendments receive during the Appropriations process.

Buck said the effort is not only aimed at overturning some of Obama’s most controversial executive orders, but regulations that conservatives argue are too burdensome for businesses.

“Not only are we going to be dealing with executive orders, we are going to be dealing with agency regulations and specifically prohibit some of the rules that have gone through the administrative procedures process [but are not yet law] and rescind them,” he said.

There are three on the top of Buck’s list: the Waters of the U.S. rule, the overtime rule and the fiduciary rule.

The Environmental Protection Agency’s Waters of the U.S. rule, a frequent Trump target, expanded the definition of waters protected under the Clean Water Act to smaller, non-navigable waters and tributaries, including some ponds and wetlands. (The Obama administration instituted it as a way to safeguard drinking water. The rule is on hold while judges review lawsuits filed citing the rules as confusing, overly burdensome and a federal government power grab.)

Seven moves Obama could make on the way out the door

Also from the Washington Examiner

Here are seven ways Obama could try to salvage his policy plans before Jan. 20, 2017.

11/15/16 12:01 AM

Another top regulation ripe for overturning, Buck said, is the Labor Department’s overtime rule that will go into effect Dec. 1 and increase pay for more than 4 million Americans, who will qualify for time-and-a-half pay when they work more than 40 hours a week.

Another is the Labor Department’s fiduciary rule, scheduled to take effect in April of next year. The bill aims to require retirement account broker-dealers and financial advisors to only provide advice that is in the client’s best interest. The rule ushers in a number of mandates, including the elimination of compensation incentives for brokers and changing how investors pay for retirement advice.

Trump has already vowed to rescind as many as 70 percent of federal regulations by his own executive orders. Buck said his Article I bill would provide an additional tool and send a message that Congress is the body the Constitution delegates to make laws, not the executive branch.

The House and Senate are also expected to use the powers provided in the Congressional Review Act to overturn recent Obama regulations. The law, enacted by the GOP-controlled Congress of 1996, gives Congress and the Trump Administration the means to overrule regulations within 60 days of them going into effect.

It’s an important law, given that Obama is expected to issue a slew of last-minute “midnight” rules and regulations during his final days in office.

Media ready for Trump to fail

Also from the Washington Examiner

The national media that misread Trump’s popularity are now anticipating his likely failures and shortcomings.

11/15/16 12:01 AM

Clinton tells House Democrats: 'No one is sorrier than me'

Top Story

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said “our hearts are broken but our determination is deepened.”

11/14/16 6:01 PM



Source link

r960-c98b620c57e03ec3e861a3e33f071234.jpg

Gingrich eyes Trump administration: 'I want to be his general planner'


Newt Gingrich said he envisions himself "looking out over the next eight years and trying to design how we fundamentally reshape the federal government and that's a very broad job." (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

While President-elect Trump’s transition team considers which campaign supporters to appoint to various position in the White House, one surrogate is making it clear where he sees himself.

“I wanna be the general planner,” former House Speaker Newt Gingrich told Fox News’ “Kelly File” on Monday.

Gingrich said he envisions himself “looking out over the next eight years and trying to design how we fundamentally reshape the federal government and that’s a very broad job.”

Breitbart Chairman Steve Bannon was appointed to chief strategist for his fighter mentality, Gingrich said, comparing his role to George W. Bush’s adviser Karl Rove.

Gingrich predicted former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani claims the secretary of state slot.

“If Rudy wants it, he’ll get it,” Gingrich said. “He would do a lot to both represent America, which is what we need, and to reform the State Department.”

The former top GOP official did not confirm or deny rumors that Lifezette’s Laura Ingraham may be tapped for press secretary.

Clinton tells House Democrats: 'No one is sorrier than me'

Top Story

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said “our hearts are broken but our determination is deepened.”

11/14/16 6:01 PM

Subscribe to Alerts

Learn more about Washington Examiner’s Alerts

Loading Next Article



Source link

1479186261

U.S. should consider Beijing-backed Asia-Pacific trade deal: China paper


BEIJING U.S. President-elect Donald Trump’s administration should consider supporting a Beijing-backed free trade deal in the Asia-Pacific, state media said on Tuesday, adding that China would be relieved to see a rival U.S.-led trade deal wither under Trump.

During his election campaign, Trump took a protectionist stance on trade issues and labeled the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) championed by President Barack Obama a “disaster”. There is now little chance of it coming up for vote in Washington before his inauguration in January.

Obama had framed the TPP, which excludes China, as part of his “pivot to Asia” and as an effort to write Asia’s trade rules before Beijing could.

China had feared the United States would use the TPP to either force it to open markets by signing up or else to isolate it from other regional economies.

“Of course, Beijing is understandably relieved that the exclusive, economically inefficient, politically antagonizing TPP is looking ever less likely to materialize by the day,” the official English-language China Daily newspaper said in an editorial.

The Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) trade talks, which are supported by Beijing but to which the United States is not party, are viewed by some observers as a competitor to U.S. economic leadership in the region.

“The incoming administration should realize that the more open, inclusive Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership will turn out to be a far more efficient vehicle for advancing U.S. interests,” the China Daily said.

“Washington may want to take advantage of the nascent, evolving platform and become involved from the rule-making stage. U.S. influence in the Asia-Pacific will not abate if the Trump administration chooses to engage with the region constructively,” the paper said.

Such editorials in state-run media do not represent Chinese government policy but they are indicative of official thinking.

RCEP groups the 10 members of the Association of South East Asian Nations plus China, Japan, South Korea, India, Australia and New Zealand, but currently does not offer the same high level of free trade openings as the TPP.

China has said it will seek support for another nascent Beijing-led trade framework, the Free Trade Area of the Asia Pacific (FTAAP), at a regional summit this month.

Peru, which will host the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) meeting and is party to the TPP, has said that Pacific-rim countries can forge a new trade deal to replace the TPP that includes China and Russia but not the United States.

(Reporting by Michael Martina; Editing by Simon Cameron-Moore)



Source link