ISIS’s new leader unmasked: Sharia law graduate Al-Salbi born into Iraqi Turkmen family is revealed as man now running the terror group after Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi fireball death in US strike

  • Two intelligence services said that al-Salbi took over from Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi
  • Al-Salbi, who helped found ISIS, brought in brutal Sharia Law in Iraq and Syria
  • Spies unmasked al-Salbi and paint a picture of extremist similar to al-Baghdadi

The new leader of Islamic State has been revealed as Iraqi Amir Mohammed Abdul Rahman al-Mawli al-Salbi.

Two intelligence services said al-Salbi took over from Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi after the terrorist leader blew himself up in October.

Al-Salbi, who helped found ISIS, brought in brutal Sharia Law in Iraq and Syria, led the enslavement of the Yazidi and has operated across the world.

The new leader of Islamic State has been revealed as Iraqi Amir Mohammed Abdul Rahman al-Mawli al-Salbi (pictured)

The new leader of Islamic State has been revealed as Iraqi Amir Mohammed Abdul Rahman al-Mawli al-Salbi (pictured) 

The terrorist was made leader just hours after al-Baghdadi died, despite his named being reported as Abu Ibrahim al-Hashimi al-Quraishi.

This was a nom de guerre and officials said they had heard little of the ‘nobody’ at the time.

Spies have unmasked al-Salbi over the past three months and paint a picture of a hardened extremist similar to al-Baghdadi, according to the Guardian.

The Mosul-born leader is believed to be one of the most influential ideologues left in ISIS’s depleted ranks and is one of the last non-Arabs.

He was born in Tal Afar, a city near Mosul, to Iraqi Turkmen. After a background as an Islamic scholar, he rose the ranks in the terror organisation, and tried to justify an attempted genocide on the Yazidi people.

Two intelligence services said al-Salbi took over from Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi (pictured) after the terrorist leader blew himself up in October

Two intelligence services said al-Salbi took over from Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi (pictured) after the terrorist leader blew himself up in October

As chief legislator al-Salbi made it so homosexuals were thrown off roofs and women accused of adultery were stoned.

He is also known as ‘The Professor’ and ‘The Destroyer’, and took over operations from al-Baghdadi from July after the leader struggled with his health.

The two became friends while caged in US Camp Bucca detention centre in Umm Qasr, Iraq.

The Americans put a $5million bounty on al-Salbi’s head – as well as two other senior terrorists – before al-Baghdadi died.

Al-Salbi claims he is a direct descendant from the Prophet Mohammed. 

Al-Baghdadi was cornered by Delta Force commandos as they stormed his compound in the village of Barisha near Idlib, northern Syria, on October 26.

The extremist cleric blew himself up by detonating a suicide belt after running into a dead end and dragging two of his children with him to their deaths.

According to U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, two of Baghdadi’s wives were killed in the assault.

The raid was a major blow to ISIS, which has lost territories it held in Syria and Iraq in a series of military defeats by the US-led coalition and Syrian and Iraqi allies.

Many IS members escaped through smuggling routes to north-western Syria in the final days of battle ahead of the group’s territorial defeat earlier this year, while others have melted into the desert in Syria or Iraq.

Despite ISIS being ousted from its final stronghold in Syria in March last year, Kurdish officials have warned they are coming under increased attacks again.

One senior official told the Guardian: ‘We’ve seen significant uptick in Isis attacks from mid last year, with the centre of gravity having now moved further south.

‘We’re now tracking on average 60 attacks a month through assassinations, roadside bombs and assaults on Iraqi security forces.

‘Their rural networks remain very much intact; after all, Isis members in Iraq still receive monthly salaries and training in remote mountainous areas. That network allows the organisation to endure, even when militarily defeated.’  

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