Day: January 20, 2020

gettyimages-1200714231-h_2020.jpg

NFL Conference Championship Ratings Hit 11-Year Low…


Sunday’s games pulled in the smallest average audience in more than a decade.

The NFL’s conference championship games were sacked in the ratings Sunday, falling double digits vs. a year ago to their smallest collective audience since 2009.

The presence of some smaller-market teams and, particularly in Fox’s primetime broadcast, a less-than-thrilling game may have all contributed to the declines. The slip on Sunday puts the 2020 playoffs slightly behind last year’s average viewership, despite the first two rounds being up over 2019.

CBS’ broadcast of the AFC Championship, a 35-24 win by the Kansas City Chiefs over the Tennessee Titans, averaged 41.11 million viewers, the smallest for the game since 2009. The network had the afternoon window this year, and its coverage was down about 7 percent from 44.08 million for Fox’s afternoon telecast of the NFC title game last year.

In primetime, Fox Sports drew 43.58 million viewers for the San Francisco 49ers’ 37-20 victory over the Green Bay Packers — a game that was even less close than the final score indicates, as the Niners led 27-0 at halftime and 34-7 at the start of the fourth quarter. Fox Sports’ audience figure also includes a simulcast on Fox Deportes and streaming, so the Fox network-only number will be somewhat smaller.

The Fox-only figure is likely to be on par with 2018’s primetime NFC title game, in which 42.3 million people watched the Philadelphia Eagles blow out the Minnesota Vikings. It’s down by at least 19 percent vs. CBS’ primetime AFC Championship broadcast a year ago.

Together, the two games averaged 42.35 million viewers, down about 14 percent from last year’s average of just under 49 million. The last time Championship Sunday drew a smaller audience was in 2009, when the two games averaged about 39.5 million viewers.

The 10 games of the 2020 playoffs averaged 33.88 million viewers, down less than 1 percent from 34.13 million for the 2019 playoffs. Both the wild-card and divisional rounds improved year over year. Regular-season viewership improved by 5 percent.

The NFL is really only competing with itself in terms of Nielsen ratings. Sunday’s games were the two most-watched programs since last year’s Super Bowl, and both were more than 11.5 million viewers clear of the biggest entertainment program since then (last year’s Oscars at 29.56 million).

TV Ratings



Source link

200116092149-06-private-wall-0115-super-tease.jpg

The private border wall being built on Rio Grande…


Fisher, an Arizona resident and head of a construction firm, saw an opportunity to help deliver on Trump’s promise by paying for and building a three-mile barrier in Mission, Texas, a city on the US-Mexico border. And as he’s pursued government contracts, he’s also launched into private projects that have both stirred controversy and put the company’s work into full view.

“Once you see it,” Fisher, donning a Fisher Industries hat with Trump 2020 stitching, recently told CNN, “this proves what we’ve been saying.”

And many have come to see it.

The privately funded project has gained national attention amid an administration push to construct 450 miles of new barriers in the ramp up to the presidential election. Fisher hopes the administration purchases the three miles of wall he constructs and signs the company up to build more miles.

“I believe we’re in America and America always buys the better technology no matter what,” Fisher said.

Travel ban expansion could include immigration restrictions on additional countries, sources say
Over a span of three hours one morning last week, landowners visited the project, Border Patrol officials cycled through and some 60 men erected dozens of feet of barrier along the riverbank. Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf also stopped by one of the company’s projects along the border late last year.

Trump has sought to pull hundreds of millions of dollars from several government accounts to build his signature border wall. But those attempts have been met with legal challenges and delays.

Fisher’s project was also temporarily halted after being sued by federal prosecutors and the National Butterfly Center, a 100-acre wild butterfly habitat near the project’s location.

Fisher’s method of building just feet from the Rio Grande river became a point of contention, in part because of the potential for flooding and damage to surrounding property.

The Trump administration’s wall plans, meanwhile, sit farther away from the river. A project down the road is a half mile from the river at its shortest point, according to Christian Alvarez, a Border Patrol spokesman.

After three years in office, the Trump administration announced earlier this month that the wall had reached the 100-mile mark — the majority of which was replacing barriers with newer, enhanced designs and around half a mile was constructed in the Rio Grande Valley where no wall previously existed.

The Rio Grande Valley poses a unique challenge to the administration since much of the land along the border is privately owned. The government needs to acquire the land to build on it, which can be a long, arduous process. While some landowners may be open to selling their property, others are resistant to the idea.

In Mission, Texas, Fisher found a landowner willing to sell his property. The $40 million private wall currently under construction is located along the river bank on private land. Nearly $2 million was provided by We Build the Wall, a group backing Trump that crowdfunded money for the wall, Fisher said.

Clayton Neuhaus, son of the landowner, frequently visits the property to observe the project. He was eager to see the progress last week.

The Trump administration is building a border wall with federal funds (left). On right, a private wall being constructed by Fisher Industries is seen near the Rio Grande river.

“This is awesome,” Neuhaus said, giving Fisher a pat on the back. “I’ve never seen this much machinery in my life,” he laughed.

Other landowners entertaining the idea of selling land to Fisher have also passed through Fisher’s construction site.

“It’s a beautiful wall,” said Sam Sparks III, who owns 1,200 acres and was touring Fisher’s project. “The concept of it being on the river is imperative, second to none.”

Sparks said the federal government has surveyed his land, but current plans would slice through his property, making it difficult to work the land. “We’d have to send people south of the wall to work,” Sparks told CNN.

Fisher says he takes federal guidelines into account and the proximity to the Rio Grande river sets him apart.

“This is where, once they see this, there’s no reason to ever build two miles, three miles off the border,” Fisher told CNN. “If you build back there, what do you got? You still have to walk through this cane field.”

But there is an advantage to having the wall farther away from the river. Alvarez explained that the lead up to the wall sets up more interdiction points, allowing agents to apprehend individuals before they reach the barriers.

‘They’re gambling’

Not all of the project’s neighbors have welcomed the private wall.

Federal prosecutors and the National Butterfly Center, a 100-acre wild butterfly habitat near the project’s location, sued Fisher over the project last year.

The International Boundary and Water Commission, a government agency, claimed that the private wall “may cause an obstruction or deflection” of the flood and river flows of the Rio Grande River that could violate a treaty between the United States and Mexico. The lawsuit was heard alongside the center’s case.

Earlier this month, after construction was temporarily halted, Southern District of Texas federal Judge Randy Crane ruled the private border wall effort could move forward.

Javier Peña, a lawyer for the National Butterfly Center, told CNN the structures run the risk of getting clogged up in the event of a flood with debris pileup and creating a potentially dangerous situation.

Border Patrol officials cycle by the barriers and watch as the crews pour in concrete. The wall is not funded by the government.

Terence Garrett, a professor of political science at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley in Brownsville who focuses on border security, echoed those concerns.

“When the water comes rushing down it goes through the bollards, it carries debris, it builds up and creates a wall. It’s dangerous,” Garrett said. “This is effectively a role of the dice. They’re gambling.”

Peña said he’s been contacted by other landowners in the region surrounding the private wall, worried about damage to their land.

Fisher, for his part, has expressed confidence in his team and says that they’ve taken precautionary measures, such as creating a slope of grass “that conveys water,” re-planting trees, and using a concrete base.

Fisher nabs a government contract

Construction firms have been competing to win multimillion-dollar contracts to build portions of the wall, including Fisher’s construction firm, Fisher Industries.

The family-owned company, which has captured Trump’s attention, was among a handful of construction firms chosen to build prototypes of the border wall in 2017.
Since then, Fisher has been awarded a $400 million border wall contract to “design-build border infrastructure along the southern perimeter of the Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge” in Arizona by the end of 2020, the Pentagon announced late last year.
Lawmakers pushed back against the award, noting Trump’s support of the company and previous proposals that didn’t meet requirements.
After requests by lawmakers to review the contract, the Defense Department inspector general said it would initiate an audit of the solicitation and contract award.

Fisher says he welcomes the audit. He’s repeatedly argued that he can get the job done faster and cheaper than his competitors. He has dozens of men working from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily to erect three miles of barrier in Mission. A project, that when done, will have taken two months, even after court’s temporary block on construction.

“I’m using our innovation to give the government and the taxpayers a more economical thing,” Fisher said.

The Trump administration, meanwhile, continues to seek additional funding for the wall.

Dozens of men work between 7 a.m. and 9 p.m. daily to finish the three-mile stretch of private wall.
Last week, the Defense Department said that it received a Department of Homeland Security request to build and pay for hundreds of additional miles of barriers on the US-Mexico border.

The request is for roughly 270 miles of border barrier and other infrastructure to be built in areas that are considered drug corridors, a mix of rural and urban areas, a senior Department of Defense official told CNN.

The administration is also considering diverting around $7.2 billion in additional Pentagon funding for border wall construction, five times what Congress authorized, sources told CNN.

The additional funds, first reported by the Washington Post, would allow the government enough money to complete approximately 885 miles of new fencing by the spring of 2022, according to an administration official.

Asked about reports that the administration is preparing to divert billions in military funds for the border wall, Secretary of Defense Mark Esper has said the Pentagon remains “committed to supporting the Department of Homeland Security and its mission” and would support its efforts financially “if that’s what it takes.”

CORRECTION: This story has been updated to reflect that acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf visited another one of Fisher’s border projects.



Source link

GettyImages-85132823.jpg

DENVER POST Columnist Fired After Arguing There Are Two Sexes…


Denver Post columnist says he was fired after disputing the idea that there are more than two sexes.

Jon Caldara, president of the libertarian Independence Institute, announced that he has been fired from the Post, chalking it up to “a difference in style” that his editors found “too insensitive.”

“My column is not a soft voiced, sticky sweet NPR-styled piece which employs the language now mandated by the victim-centric, identity politics driven media,” he said in a Facebook post. “What seemed to be the last straw for my column was my insistence that there are only two sexes and my frustration that to be inclusive of the transgendered (even that word isn’t allowed) we must lose our right to free speech.”

David Rutz breaks down the most important news about the enemies of freedom, here and around the world, in this comprehensive morning newsletter.

Sign up here and stay informed!

Caldara criticized an Associated Press directive saying that sex and gender are not binary. “There are only two sexes, identified by an XX or XY chromosome. That is the very definition of binary. The AP ruling it isn’t so doesn’t change science. It’s a premeditative attempt to change culture and policy. It’s activism,” he wrote on Jan. 3. In a column two weeks later, Caldara also railed against a 2019 Colorado law that required elementary school children to be instructed in transgender ideology.

“Some parents weren’t thrilled a couple of years back when during school their little ones in Boulder Valley School District were treated to videos staring [sic] a transgender teddy bear teaching the kids how to misuse pronouns or when Colorado’s ‘Trans Community Choir’ sang to kids about a transgender raven,” Caldara wrote. “What are the protections for a parent who feels transgender singing groups and teddy bears with gender dysphoria might be ‘stigmatizing’ for their kid?”

Caldara said that he was fired by the paper’s editorial page editor, Megan Schrader, according to an interview with Westword published Monday.

“Megan told me I was the page’s most-read columnist. But there’s now a permanently and perpetually offended class, and in order to speak, you need to use their terminology. There’s a whole lot of you-can’t-say-that-ism going on right now.”

In an email to the Washington Free Beacon, Schrader confirmed that she fired Caldara but declined to discuss the reason.

“I am writing a job description as we speak to fill his position,” she said. “I hope that conservative Colorado writers will apply knowing that we value conservative voices on our pages and don’t have a litmus test for their opinions.”

Alex GriswoldAlex is a staff writer at the Washington Free Beacon. He graduated from the University of Notre Dame in 2012. Before joining the Free Beacon, he was a writer for Mediaite and The Daily Caller. He is originally from Buffalo, New York, but regrettably now lives in Washington, D.C. He can be reached at griswold@freebeacon.com.



Source link

1579559658_social

European Regulators Target Big Tech…


Large tech companies have become more powerful in the past decade thanks to two things: their ability to deliver goods and services that people want, and their ability to collect and cross-pollinate the personal data of billions of their customers.

It is the latter that concerns government regulators, particularly in the West.

The multibillion-dollar fines and settlements seen so far for privacy infringements may be just pocket money for the tech giants. But a new regulatory offensive—expected to be rolled out more fully, especially in Europe, this year—threatens some of Silicon Valley’s most successful business models. The General Data Protection Regulation, a sweeping rule now being enforced across the European Union, was a first volley. It requires strict adherence by companies to a new set of privacy rules.

In a different approach, one tackling both data and competition issues at the same time, German regulators have issued a ruling requiring

Facebook Inc.


FB 0.17%

to keep personal data of German users that it gathers through its main site separate from data that it gathers on its other services—WhatsApp, Instagram and Facebook Messenger. Users would need to give permission for their data to be shared across the platforms. The German regulator ruled that Facebook’s ability to merge data is an abuse of power and ordered the company in Germany to change its terms of service, the long document that all users of an internet service agree to before using it.

Facebook was granted an appeal in the Higher Regional Court of Düsseldorf. The case is now expected to be heard later this year in the Federal Court of Justice, Germany’s highest court.

Facebook declined to comment on the regulatory ruling for this article. But a member of Facebook’s legal team in a blog post last February referred to the German regulators’ approach as “unconventional.” The company also has said that it keeps data about its users secure, and founder and Chief Executive

Mark Zuckerberg

has talked up a more “privacy-focused” social network, including plans to encrypt messages sent through his company’s messaging services.

The effort by Germany’s regulators reflects a broad strategic tack in antitrust investigations around the world in which the collection and collation of data by tech companies in specific markets is seen as instrumental in the companies’ ability to achieve dominance in those markets.

“It’s the combination of the data that enables these big boys to do targeted advertising,” says

Thomas Vinje,

chairman of antitrust practice at Clifford Chance LLP in Brussels.

It is also why antitrust efforts and data-privacy protection are converging. Normally, the two issues are pursued by different sets of regulatory bodies, but more crossover is happening, says Mr. Vinje.

“Privacy and competition are reinforcing one another,” Yves-Alexandre de Montjoye, an academic who has advised EU antitrust authorities on digital policy, said at an antitrust conference in December.

Europe’s top antitrust cop,

Margrethe Vestager,

now has a second, broader role, as the European Commission’s vice president for digital policy, deciding how the EU should regulate internet businesses.

In her antitrust role, Ms. Vestager has already imposed billions of dollars of fines on

Alphabet Inc.’s

Google, alleging a series of anticompetitive behavior in a handful of cases. Google has defended its practices, and has appealed in most cases. This year, Ms. Vestager is expected to look more closely at how massive data troves drawn from a range of sources by one company can create unfair advantages. For instance, Google can leverage people’s search, browsing and location data from Android phones to help it maintain its role as an online-advertising juggernaut.

A Google spokesperson says that the company is engaging with regulators and that it uses data to make its products more helpful to consumers.

In Australia, the country’s antitrust authorities, who deal with anticompetitive practices like price fixing, recently sued Google for the way it harvests users’ location data to show targeted advertisements. Google has said it intends to defend itself against the regulator’s claims, filed in October.

More From the World Economic Forum

The U.K. is also making data collection a bigger focus of antitrust probes into big tech firms, says Will Perrin, a researcher who helped set up the U.K.’s main communications regulator, Ofcom. In December, for instance, the Competition and Markets Authority, Britain’s competition watchdog, issued a press release that said personal data collection “plays an important role in driving Google and Facebook’s powerful market position.” It added that the default settings of online services on things like location data, “have a profound effect on choice and the shape of competition.”

Apart from their new focus on data, regulators are also looking to make internet companies more liable for the content they host. Critics say that existing laws, such as Europe’s 19-year-old E-Commerce Directive and the 24-year-old Communications Decency Act in the U.S., are out of date and have loopholes that allow Facebook and Google to use the principle of freedom of expression to insulate themselves from liability for hosting such content as child pornography or terror propaganda.

Later this year, the EU plans to revamp its law with new, sweeping rules aimed at changing that, in legislation known as the Digital Services Act.

Regulators in Britain, Canada and Asia are working on similar measures.

The U.K. is also likely to consider legislation that will empower a new regulator with sweeping power to better police internet content. The legislation borrows from the decades-old “duty of care” principle, which underpins its health and safety laws: A disturbing video could create the same kind of liability for a tech platform as a banana peel on a shop floor.

The concept, while not yet tested in court, could help regulators get around the freedom-of-expression defense often employed by big tech companies.

Ms. Olson is a reporter for The Wall Street Journal in London. She can be reached at parmy.olson@wsj.com. Rochelle Toplensky, a columnist with Heard on the Street, contributed to this article. Email her at rochelle.toplensky@wsj.com.

Share Your Thoughts

What kinds of regulations, if any, do you believe should be put on big technology companies? Join the conversation below.

Copyright ©2019 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 87990cbe856818d5eddac44c7b1cdeb8



Source link

190611-pat-cipollone-gty-773.jpg

TUESDAY: TRUMP TRIAL BEGINS


Democrats built their impeachment case from that July 25 phone call transcript during which Trump urged Ukraine’s newly elected president to investigate his political rivals, including former Vice President Joe Biden. The House Intelligence Committee also interviewed 17 witnesses, including some who described deep confusion and chaos inside the administration after Trump ordered the withholding of military aid to Ukraine.

The obstruction charge arose from Trump’s blanket order to his administration to refuse cooperation with the House probe, an order that many of the witnesses whom Democrats sought to question ultimately defied. Trump also prevented the State Department, Pentagon and White House budget office from sharing documents that could shed light on the arrangements. Several key witnesses, including acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney and former national security adviser John Bolton have refused to cooperate as well.

Democrats have emphasized that Congress and the courts have long agreed that impeachable offenses don’t require statutory crimes — in fact, the House Judiciary Committee approved “abuse of power” and “obstruction of Congress” charges in the past presidential impeachment attempts of Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton, and the House considered but ultimately rejected an abuse of power charge against Clinton.

But it appears that Trump’s team plans to sidestep the substance of Democrats’ case and focus instead on what they claim was a rushed investigation that offered no meaningful chance for Trump to participate. “The goal was to impeach the president, no matter the facts,” the president’s lawyers argued Monday.

Democrats did in fact offer Trump and his attorneys a chance to present a rebuttal and propose witnesses during the Judiciary Committee’s hearings in December, but the lawyers declined, claiming the process was unfair. Democrats also note that Trump’s allies in Congress had equal access to the hearings to question witnesses and push back on the allegations.

Democrats have also emphasized that they view the House’s function as analogous to a grand jury, while the Senate trial — which begins in earnest on Tuesday — is where the White House’s witnesses and evidence can be fully considered.

Senators are expected to spend most of Tuesday jockeying over the rules of the trial, while the House is expected to present evidence and arguments beginning on Wednesday. The House’s seven prosecutors, Trump’s lawyers and the senators themselves are largely in the dark about how much time all of the speakers will have and when to expect floor votes on whether witnesses should even be considered.

Trump’s reply brief is the final written document that the president’s lawyers are required to present before the trial starts. In it, they rejected the House’s own charges spelled out in their 111-page brief submitted on Saturday, which said the president’s “ongoing pattern of misconduct demonstrates that he is an immediate threat to the nation and the rule of law.”

The president’s lawyers countered with a sweeping attack on the House’s effort, urging the Senate to immediately reject the articles and warning of the precedent that would be established if Trump faced removal from office over the allegations Democrats have raised.

“The diluted standard asserted here would permanently weaken the presidency and forever alter the balance among the branches of government in a manner that offends the constitutional design established by the Founders,” Trump’s brief said.

The president’s team even went as far as suggesting a conviction in the Senate could be “unconstitutional.” In the brief’s final section, the lawyers suggest that the House’s impeachment articles are written so broadly that even if two-thirds of the Senate supported them, it may be for different reasons — rendering the conviction invalid.

“The deficiency in the articles cannot be remedied by dividing the articles, because that is prohibited,” they write. “The only constitutional option is to reject the articles and acquit the President.”

Though a conviction is viewed as highly unlikely in the Republican-controlled Senate, the president’s argument raises the prospect that if such a vote occurred, he might refuse to accept it. It also gives him another talking point as he criss-crosses the country in re-election mode with an eye on helping Republicans build their Senate majority and even retake the House to kickstart a possible second term.

The president’s response ignores large swaths of the House’s evidence, and all but omits the connection to personal attorney Rudy Giuliani, a central figure in the Ukraine episode who has been sidelined from any formal role in Trump’s defense on the Senate floor. The White House brief mentions Giuliani’s name just three times — though two are footnotes — compared to the 91 mentions in Saturday’s House brief. The White House brief makes only one mention of Guiliani’s associate, Lev Parnas, via a footnote that references a subpoena sent in October for documents and testimony.

Sprinkled throughout the document is pushback to some of the factual allegations lodged by Democrats. For example, Trump’s lawyers back up the president’s interest in pursuing a potential Biden investigation by arguing that Trump had legitimate reasons for temporarily delaying military assistance to Ukraine. The president’s attorneys suggest that his interest in Kyiv investigating allegations of its own interference in the 2016 U.S. election — a theory that Trump’s own National Security Council and intelligence community has rejected — was sound.

The brief ignores a recent review by the nonpartisan General Accountability Office that declared Trump’s move to halt aid violated the law by substituting his policy priorities for a lawful congressional appropriation — without notifying Congress. In defending Trump’s interest in debunked claims about Ukrainian election interference, the president’s lawyers omit his reference to CrowdStrike, the security company at the heart of refuted conspiracy theories, as well as the unfounded claim that a hacked Democratic Party server was housed in Ukraine.

Trump is scheduled to leave Washington later Monday for an international economic summit in Davos, Switzerland, putting him on foreign soil and multiple time zones ahead of the opening days of an impeachment trial where his presidency and political future are on the line. Before his departure, the president took to Twitter to criticize House Democrats over an impeachment process that he ordered his own team of aides and lawyers to sit out.

“They didn’t want John Bolton and others in the House. They were in too much of a rush. Now they want them all in the Senate. Not supposed to be that way!” Trump tweeted.

Five minutes later, the president continued: “Cryin’ Chuck Schumer is now asking for ‘fairness’, when he and the Democrat House members worked together to make sure I got ZERO fairness in the House. So, what else is new?”

Minutes after Trump’s legal team filed its brief, the House impeachment managers formally responded to the president’s summons — a broad overview of their case against the impeachment charges — that was submitted on Saturday.

“President Trump has engaged in the trifecta of constitutional misconduct warranting removal,” the managers wrote in response. “He is the Framers’ worst nightmare come to life.”

That Democratic reply came as the House impeachment managers held meetings on Capitol Hill and completed a walk-through of the Senate chamber ahead of the first full week of the trial.

The walk-through included a tour of the anteroom off the Senate floor where House lawyers will be stationed during the trial. The room had two rows of desktop computers and TV screens that will likely show the Senate floor while the managers are making their case during opening arguments. The White House legal team, led by Cipollone, did its own walk-through of the Senate chamber on Monday afternoon.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-Calif.), the lead impeachment manager, declined to respond to questions about the White House’s brief.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has yet to reveal the exact procedures for the trial, which are likely to be approved on a party-line vote when the Senate convenes at 1 p.m. on Tuesday. Democrats have objected to the possibility that McConnell will seek to limit the number of days allotted for opening arguments, which could lead to marathon 12-hour days in the beginning of the trial.



Source link

5e2615c34dfa8.image_.jpg

22,000 attend…




Mikaela E. Beschler

Mikaela E. Beschler



A 21-year-old Richmond woman was charged Monday with wearing a mask in public following the gun-rights rally in Richmond.

Police said a Richmond officer warned Mikaela E. Beschler, of the 1100 block of North 34th Street, on two earlier occasions that day to adjust the bandanna covering her face. She was arrested the third time the officer working the event saw here around 1:30 p.m. in the 800 block of East Broad Street.

Beschler was released on her own recognizance.

The 1950s-era law — aimed at unmasking the Ku Klux Klan in Virginia — makes it illegal for anyone over the age of 16 to conceal their face, and therefore their identity, in public. The felony carries a maximum of five years in prison.

The arrest was made about 1.5 hours after the official end of the Lobby Day rally. Police said the Capitol grounds were cleared around the same time as the arrest, which was less than half a mile north on Broad Street.

Hundreds of people attending the event covered their faces. Some may have done it to keep from being identified, though many were bundled up from the cold with temperatures in the 20s and 30s throughout the day.



20200121_MET_GUNS_BB20

Part of the crowd at the pro-gun rally on and around Capitol Square in Richmond, VA Monday, Jan. 20, 2020.



22,000 attended Richmond gun-rights rally, police say

Police estimated 22,000 people attended Monday’s gun-rights rally in Richmond.

Estimates from the Joint Information Center, made up of spokespeople from Capitol, Richmond and Virginia State Police, say about 6,000 people were allowed into Capitol Square with another 16,000 outside the gates.

Organizers had said they expected 50,000 people to attend.

– Ali Rocket, Times-Dispatch

No charges expected for man detained while climbing to roof of Main Street building



gun rally

The front of the Mutual Building on E. Main Street where a man was detained climbing a catwalk to the roof.



2:45 p.m.: A man who was detained by security after climbing the outside catwalk to the roof of the Mutual Building, 909 E. Main Street, was released and there are no charges expected.

The incident happened shortly before 11:30 am, while the pro-gun rally was still going on at the capitol just a couple blocks away.

The man carrying a backpack climbed the catwalk, on the Cary Street side of the building, and was detained by security, according to Chuck Potts, senior regional operations manager for Admiral Security Services, which handles security for the building. He was questioned, searched and released. He was not turned over to police and there are no charges expected.

The man did not have any guns or weapons visible but was “dressed to be up there” with hat and gloves, Potts said.

“The guy figured it was the best vantage point for him to take pictures,” Potts said.

– Paige Mudd, Times-Dispatch

1:57 p.m.: Law enforcement officials posted on the VaCapitol2020 social media accounts at 1:39 p.m. that Capitol Square has emptied out.

“No arrests have been made at this time.”

Gun-rights rally organizer: ‘This is what happens when you threaten the rights of Americans’



20200121_MET_GUNS_BB20

Part of the crowd at the pro-gun rally on and around Capitol Square in Richmond, VA Monday, Jan. 20, 2020.





gun rights

Philip Van Cleave, head of the Virginia Citizens Defense League, speaks during a gun-rights rally in Capitol Square in Richmond on Monday.



1:15 p.m.: The main event Monday was a rally on the steps of the Capitol Building.

With thousands standing on the grass below, Virginia Citizens Defense League President Philip Van Cleave and others criticized the gun control measures making their way through the General Assembly.

“This is what happens when you threaten the rights of Americans,” Van Cleave said, leading the thousands inside the fenced-off area in a “no more gun control” chant.

Stephen Willeford, who shot a mass shooter in Texas in 2017, said the fight against gun control is a national battle.

“We will stand together,” he said. “They will not disarm us.”

While most of Monday’s attendees were from Virginia, there was a large contingent from outside the state, including one person who chose to stand on Bank Street waving a Texas flag.

Erich Pratt, the senior vice president of Gun Owners of America, said Democrats’ gun control proposals, which include universal background checks and an assault weapons ban, among other things, are ill-targeted.

“Gun control doesn’t stop bad guys with guns,” he said.

Republican members of the General Assembly echoed that sentiment.

“I’m not sure what part of ‘shall not be infringed’ they don’t understand,” said Del. John McGuire, R-Henrico.

The rally lasted about an hour, with some attendees choosing to stay on the grounds and take pictures while others left to join the thousands outside the fenced-off area.

Police started clearing the streets around the Capitol around 1:15 p.m.

– Justin Mattingly, Times-Dispatch



gun rally

Police starting clear streets around Capitol on Monday afternoon.



 

“If I can’t go inside, I thought I might as well wear my gun”

11 a.m.: Just beyond the entrance to an eerily quiet Virginia Capitol were some of the loudest, most energetic sections of Monday’s gun-rights rally.

The area offered a clear view of the main stage for rallygoers who refused to leave their firearms or flag poles behind in order to go inside Capitol Square.

A large navy blue flag that read, “Trump 2020,” waved above a smattering of yellow, “Don’t tread on me” flags. The same words were also superimposed on a rainbow gay pride flag.

Nearby, someone waved a cardboard sign that read, “Gun control is Jim Crow,” as the crowd chanted “We will not comply,” and, “Northam’s gotta go.”

Law enforcement officials declined to estimate the crowd size at the start of the program organized by the Virginia Citizens Defense League.

David Treibs, 55, brought a flag bearing an AR-15, a star and the words, “Come and take it.” Treibs drove from Fredericksburg, Texas to “stand with the people of Virginia in support of the Second Amendment.”

Treibs says a version of the flag bearing a cannon goes back to an 1835 conflict between Texan colonists and Mexico. The flag can be seen throughout Texas, he said, and he hoped to display it at Monday’s rally.

Two of his sons held a larger version on the corner of West Grace Street and 9th Street.

“We wanted to bring our flags, but they don’t allow poles inside,” Treibs said, standing with a long gun strapped around his chest, a flag on one hand and a stack of pamphlets on the other.

“If I can’t go inside, I thought I might as well wear my gun.”

Near the gun-rights rally, a small pro-Communist group briefly held signs and chanted “revolution,” prompting counter chants of “four more years” in support of President Donald Trump.

– Mel Leonor, Times-Dispatch

A lively discussion inside the legislative offices



gun rally

Sen. Jennifer Boysko, D-Fairfax, talks to a group of gun-rights advocates during lobby day on Monday.



11 a.m.: Sen. Jennifer Boysko, D-Fairfax, engaged in a spirited debate with a group of gun rights supporters in the hallway of the legislative office building about the proper way to protect people from gun violence.

The lobbyists pressed her on red flag laws, which allow law enforcement to temporarily confiscate firearms with a court order if a person is believed to be a danger to themself or others, arguing that it shirked due process protections and that it would be better to give the person help and protection from all potential weapons.

Boysko said that lawmakers were proceeding carefully on the laws because people on both sides of the aisle wanted to ensure due process rights are protected.

“I’ve held three or four town halls,” Boysko said. “I’m actually listening and taking notes. I’m from Alabama and Arkansas. I grew up around guns. I’m not afraid. However, I do think there are a small number of things we can do that would help reduce violence.”

One veteran said he’d be appalled if Virginia passed laws that would make possessing a certain number of rounds of ammunition a felony because it would make him, who fought wars overseas, and other “everyday citizens” felons for not complying with a law they believe is unconstitutional.

Boysko said that she did not support Senate Bill 16, which banned assault firearms and made other limits on guns and magazines, because she and other lawmakers did not think that the bill was carefully thought out.

A few people in the crowd thanked her for rejecting the bill.

Brandon Howard, who was leading a lobbying group and is running for the Hopewell City Council, told Boysko if the legislature is concerned about gun violence, it should be looking at mandatory minimum sentences.

“Ninety percent of a lot of the gun violence that happens — especially in Hopewell — are by convicted felons who are out,” Howard said.

Other lobbyists emphasized the importance of focusing on helping the mentally ill and keeping criminals off the streets, rather than focusing on guns.

“I appreciate that you all are here,” Boysko told the group at one point during the debate. “Democracy works best when we have civil conversations. You can vote at the ballot box next time. That is how we make change.”

— Bridget Balch, Times-Dispatch



gun rally

The crowd at Capitol Square as seen from the Pocahontas Building around 10:45 a.m. on Monday.



As crowds fill streets, lobbying goes on inside General Assembly offices



gun rally

A sign welcomes gun-rights lobbyists at the office of state Sen. Amanda F. Chase.



10:30 a.m.: Sen. Monty Mason, D-Williamsburg, was sitting quietly in his office with the door open as gun-rights lobbyists milled outside.

Mason was preparing for bills before Senate Commerce and Labor Committee in the afternoon.

“It looks like every Martin Luther King Day to me,” he said.

A state holiday, Martin Luther King Day long as been an occasion for gun-rights and other public advocates to lobby legislators.

“This has always been a really interesting day in Capitol Square,” Mason said.

However, the sound of the rally in the square as crowds thronged on North 10th Street were audible in his fifth-floor office.

“I hope no one gets hurt out there,” Mason said.

In the hall outside his office, John Flynn was directing two 10-person teams lobbying senators for the VCDL.

He had split the team in half to make its size more manageable. Each team was assigned four senators.

“The teams are a little bigger than they are most years,” he said.

This is the fourth Lobby Day for Flynn, a volunteer from Midlothian.

He said league members are disappointed in the new rule banning firearms in the legislative office building and Capitol, but it hasn’t stopped them from coming unarmed.

“The people serious about lobbying said, ‘We’re going to do what we’re going to do,” Flynn said.

– Michael Martz, Times-Dispatch



gun rally

The view of the Virginia General Assembly as seen from Bank Street outside of Capitol Square on Monday.



No arrests as of 10 a.m.

10 a.m.: As of 10 a.m., the Joint Information Center, which is manned by a contingent of spokespeople from Capitol Police, Richmond Police and Virginia State Police, reports that there have been no arrests.

They are receiving regular updates from Capitol Square and haven’t reported any incident, except a medical emergency that forced one person from the line and into an ambulance. An official said the medical condition didn’t appear serious.

Large crowds of gun-rights supporters radiated out on streets surrounding Capitol Square.

Along 8th Street, a supporter of President Donald Trump encouraged gun-rights supporters to register to vote.

On Grace Street, a gun-rights supporter carrying a large American flag strode away from the rally. He said he needed to go sit in his truck for a few minutes because it was so cold he couldn’t feel his fingers.

— Ali Rockett and Andrew Cain, Times-Dispatch

Capitol Square and surrounding streets fill with protesters

9:45 a.m.: With bands of well-armed and armored militia groups standing watch around the Capitol, throngs of protesters are hoping to use their voice as part of the show of force happening at the Virginia General Assembly.

Holding a sign warning gun-control supporters that they could trigger a “civil war,” Mackenzie Mcgough, 25, of North Chesterfield, said he thinks today’s event could mark a historical moment.

“You’re going to start something you wish you hadn’t. I don’t own a gun personally, but I know a lot of people who are going to be upset,” he said. “I think we’re allowed to bear arms. I think they’re trying to push the goal post. They don’t want us to have any guns. That’s not going to happen.”

Others with similar sentiments traveled from afar to be in Richmond on Monday.



gun rally

We asked Smiles Welch about his MLK sign. He said there’s a link between the Second Amendment and Civil Rights movements.



Smiles Welch, 41, of Athens, Ohio, held a sign quoting Martin Luther King, Jr. in honor of the civil rights leader whose namesake holiday in Virginia has become a day of lobbying for interest groups around the state, since many people are usually off work and available to come to Richmond.

When asked why he selected that quote, he said he sees a parallel between the Civil Rights movement and the people rallying today.

“None of us want to use the weapons that we want to keep to preserve peace. We’re here for safety and everyone’s freedom,” he said. “Although the cause we’re here for today is not exactly the same as the cause he fought for, they are directly linked. We all stand for freedom and equality, and the well-being of all people of America.”

A few blocks down Ninth Street, about two dozen people wearing body armor stood silently in the road, facing the Capitol, guns in hand. A man who appeared to be in charge said the group was not affiliated with any organization, and that most of them were from Central and Northern Virginia.

– Chris Suarez, Times-Dispatch

Inside the Pocahontas Building: ‘Lobby Day is when you peacefully petition your legislators’



gun rally

People waiting outside the Pocahontas Building near Capitol Square on Monday morning. 



9 a.m.: The public lines moved smoothly into the Pocahontas Building on Monday morning as people wearing orange “Guns Save Lives” stickers prepared to visit lawmakers for the annual Lobby Day for members of the Virginia Citizens Defense League.

League members dismissed concerns about outside nationalist groups swamping the annual lobbying event with agendas beyond protecting gun owner rights.

“People are conflating Lobby Day with things Lobby Day is not about,” said David Yarashus, who came from Annandale with four of his seven children. “Lobby Day is when you peacefully petition your legislators.”

The issue for league members is solely gun rights, said Yarashus, who was preparing to visit lawmakers with one organized group.

“I believe self-defense is the one of the most basic of human rights,” he said. “We need laws. That allow people to protect themselves.”



gun rally

Lobbying in the Pocahontas building is busy, but not overwhelming on Monday morning. Groups, almost all wearing “Guns save lives” stickers, are waiting in lines outside of legislators’ offices for a chance to sit down with them for a few minutes.



Thomas New, of Henrico, says some lawmakers are more willing to listen than others.

“Dick Saslaw doesn’t have the guts to talk to us,” New said of Senate Majority Leader Dick Saslaw, D-Fairfax. “Creigh Deeds does.”

Deeds is a Democratic senator from Bath County whose district includes Charlottesville.

New is a Revolutionary War re-enactor — he portrays a frontier scout — who said he worked for a security alarm company when Richmond was “the murder capital of the country.”

He contends that the one-gun-a-month law passed under then-Gov. Doug Wilder contributed to gun violence in the city, while concealed carry of firearms helped.

“If you send a message to criminals, they get it,” New said.

Kevin Brown came to Richmond from Southern California, but not for the rally.

Brown, 30, is a computer software engineer who is visiting for work training.

But he’s also an amateur historian — wearing a shirt with the Virginia state seal — who is concerned about government taking away firearms as a first step to total control.

“I’m here primarily because inch by inch the government has been basically taking the firearms,” he said.

Brown called “red flag” legislation that would allow temporary confiscation of guns from people found to be dangerous a “literally Soviet Union style snitching law.”

– Michael Martz, Times-Dispatch



gun rally

View from building at 9th and Main streets of the gun-right rally in Richmond around 8:30 a.m. on Monday.



Thousands gather around Capitol Square in Richmond ahead of gun-rights rally

8:45 a.m.: Thousands of gun-rights supporters, some of them heavily armed, are massing outside of the Capitol grounds ahead of today’s gun-rights rally scheduled for 11 a.m.

The gun-rights rally organized by the Virginia Citizens Defense League is slated from 11 to noon.

Chants erupting in the crowd outside the perimeter have ranged from “USA, USA” to “Northam out” and “Treasonous Democrats.”

Gun-rights rallies have been an annual part of Lobby Day at the state Capitol. This year’s rally is much larger than usual because the legislature’s new Democratic majority is seeking gun-control measures that have sparked concern among gun-rights advocates.

State authorities beefed up security for the rally, warning that militias and white supremacist groups from other states were threatening to come to Richmond, seeking to attach their causes to the rally.

‘Northam out’ chants around Capitol Square

8:15 a.m.: Inside the fenced-in area, gun rights supporters voiced their displeasure with not only the gun control proposals but Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam.

Protesters chanted “Northam out” while holding up an enlarged photo of a picture from Northam’s medical school yearbook that shows a man in blackface and another in a KKK robe. 

As many rally inside, thousands of others are outside on Bank Street, some carrying guns they were told couldn’t come into Capitol Square.

– Justin Mattingly, Times-Dispatch

Thousands gather at The Diamond to board shuttles to Capitol Square rally



gun rally

Jonathan Stone, left, Joe Stone and Derek Setliff traveled from Shawboro, N.C. on Monday morning to participate in the Virginia Citizens Defense League’s lobbying day and said they were worried North Carolina might adopt similar gun control laws if they didn’t protest and show they were unpopular with the people there.



8:15 a.m.: Thousands gathered at The Diamond on Monday morning to board shuttles headed downtown for the Virginia Citizens Defense League’s Lobbying Day rally.

Those in line came from all over the state and beyond to participate in the group’s annual event with gun control legislation proposed by Virginia legislators sparking renewed vigor in Second Amendment organizations.



gun rally

Brian Scholten, a 21-year-old Virgina Tech student, said he and others were on the road by 3 a.m. Monday morning to participate in the Virginia Citizens Defense League’s lobbying day.



Brian Scholten, a 21-year-old Virgina Tech student from Strasburg in Shenandoah County, said the recent legislation in Virginia had been a wakeup call for him and others.

“I think all the organizing shows Virginia people are not happy,” Scholten said.

Scholten said he and his friends were on the road by 3 a.m. to participate in the event, which volunteers have said will be the largest lobbying day crowd they’d ever seen.

Chris Williams, 42, said he has helped with the last several events and estimated today’s crowd was around three times the size of last year’s nearly 800 people.

William’s said those who showed up today were not here to protest but to lobby and open up dialogues with elected officials.

He said he hopes people come away with stronger relationships and a new commitment to getting more involved with public action.

“When I see crowds like this I think there’s a bright future for Virginia,” Williams said.

Johnnie Leggette, a longtime attendee now retired and living in Pennsylvania, said he was worried if other states saw Virginia pass gun control laws uncontested then they would take up similar bills elsewhere.

Leggette’s concerns were echoed by others who had traveled from Maryland and North Carolina to voice their concerns.

Leggette said he hopes people around the country see what he and others are doing today and become encouraged to take similar action.

– Samuel Northrop, Times-Dispatch

Video: Crowd at Capitol for lobby day

Medical emergency in line at Capitol Square

7:30 a.m.: A man is stable after having a medical emergency while waiting in line to enter Capitol Square.

Just before 7 a.m. an ambulance took the man to a local hospital for treatment.

PHOTOS: Scenes from Capitol Square in Richmond on Monday morning



Source link

110580632_c0121365-breast_cancer_cells_lm_-spl.jpg

Immune discovery 'may treat all cancer'…


Breast cancer cellsImage copyright
Science Photo Library

Image caption

The new technique could kill a wide range of cancer cells, including breast and prostate

A newly-discovered part of our immune system could be harnessed to treat all cancers, say scientists.

The Cardiff University team discovered a method of killing prostate, breast, lung and other cancers in lab tests.

The findings, published in Nature Immunology, have not been tested in patients, but the researchers say they have “enormous potential”.

Experts said that although the work was still at an early stage, it was very exciting.

What have they found?

Our immune system is our body’s natural defence against infection, but it also attacks cancerous cells.

The scientists were looking for “unconventional” and previously undiscovered ways the immune system naturally attacks tumours.

What they found was a T-cell inside people’s blood. This is an immune cell that can scan the body to assess whether there is a threat that needs to be eliminated.

The difference is this one could attack a wide range of cancers.

“There’s a chance here to treat every patient,” researcher Prof Andrew Sewell told the BBC.

He added: “Previously nobody believed this could be possible.

“It raises the prospect of a ‘one-size-fits-all’ cancer treatment, a single type of T-cell that could be capable of destroying many different types of cancers across the population.”

How does it work?

T-cells have “receptors” on their surface that allow them to “see” at a chemical level.

The Cardiff team discovered a T-cell and its receptor that could find and kill a wide range of cancerous cells in the lab including lung, skin, blood, colon, breast, bone, prostate, ovarian, kidney and cervical cancer cells.

Crucially, it left normal tissues untouched.

Image copyright
Science Photo Library

Image caption

T-cells attack cancer cells

Exactly how it does this is still being explored.

This particular T-cell receptor interacts with a molecule called MR1, which is on the surface of every cell in the human body.

It is thought MR1 is flagging the distorted metabolism going on inside a cancerous cell to the immune system.

“We are the first to describe a T-cell that finds MR1 in cancer cells – that hasn’t been done before, this is the first of its kind,” research fellow Garry Dolton told the BBC.

Why is this significant?

T-cell cancer therapies already exist and the development of cancer immunotherapy has been one of the most exciting advances in the field.

The most famous example is CAR-T – a living drug made by genetically engineering a patient’s T-cells to seek out and destroy cancer.

CAR-T can have dramatic results that transform some patients from being terminally ill to being in complete remission.

However, the approach is highly specific and works in only a limited number of cancers where there is a clear target to train the T-cells to spot.

And it has struggled to have any success in “solid cancers” – those that form tumours rather than blood cancers such as leukaemia.

The researchers say their T-cell receptor could lead to a “universal” cancer treatment.

So how would it work in practice?

The idea is that a blood sample would be taken from a cancer patient.

Their T-cells would be extracted and then genetically modified so they were reprogrammed to make the cancer-finding receptor.

The upgraded cells would be grown in vast quantities in the laboratory and then put back into the patient. It is the same process used to make CAR-T therapies.

However, the research has been tested only in animals and on cells in the laboratory, and more safety checks would be needed before human trials could start.

What do the experts say?

Lucia Mori and Gennaro De Libero, from University of Basel in Switzerland, said the research had “great potential” but was at too early a stage to say it would work in all cancers.

“We are very excited about the immunological functions of this new T-cell population and the potential use of their TCRs in tumour cell therapy,” they said.

Daniel Davis, a professor of immunology at the University of Manchester, said: “At the moment, this is very basic research and not close to actual medicines for patients.

“There is no question that it’s a very exciting discovery, both for advancing our basic knowledge about the immune system and for the possibility of future new medicines.”

Follow James on Twitter.



Source link

sexy-vegan.jpg

Man named Sexy Vegan pleads no contest to sexually assaulting dog…


A California man named Sexy Vegan entered a no-contest plea in a case where he was accused of sexually assaulting his dog and posting a video of the abuse on social media, officials announced Friday.

Vegan — whose name was previously Hansel Marion DeBartolo III — was busted for posting a video that showed a pit bull licking his rear end on Sept. 5, the Los Angeles County DA’s office said.

The 37-year-old West Hollywood man entered the no-contest plea to one misdemeanor count of disturbing the peace and was sentenced to two years probation, 100 hours of community services and a 52-week sexual offender program, prosecutors said.

He had initially been charged with one misdemeanor count each of sexual assault on an animal and posting obscene matter.

As part of his plea, the two dogs that were taken from Vegan — who has his moniker tattooed across his face — won’t be returned to him, and he cannot get any new pets during his probation, prosecutors said.

Vegan was kicked off of an episode of “Dr. Phil” — called “My Brother Changed His Name to ‘Sexy Vegan,’ Wears Speedos in Public and is Spending My Mom’s $11 Million Inheritance!” — for using excessive profanity.



Source link

200120143020-chicago-tribune-stock-super-tease.jpg

TROUBLES: CHICAGO TRIBUNE staffers seek new owners amid fears of hedge fund takeover…


‘);$vidEndSlate.removeClass(‘video__end-slate–inactive’).addClass(‘video__end-slate–active’);}};CNN.autoPlayVideoExist = (CNN.autoPlayVideoExist === true) ? true : false;var configObj = {thumb: ‘none’,video: ‘business/2019/12/29/should-struggling-local-newspapers-turn-into-nonprofits.cnn’,width: ‘100%’,height: ‘100%’,section: ‘domestic’,profile: ‘expansion’,network: ‘cnn’,markupId: ‘large-media_0’,adsection: ‘const-article-carousel-pagetop’,frameWidth: ‘100%’,frameHeight: ‘100%’,posterImageOverride: {“mini”:{“width”:220,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191229130640-rs-huntsman-small-169.jpg”,”height”:124},”xsmall”:{“width”:307,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191229130640-rs-huntsman-medium-plus-169.jpg”,”height”:173},”small”:{“width”:460,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191229130640-rs-huntsman-large-169.jpg”,”height”:259},”medium”:{“width”:780,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191229130640-rs-huntsman-exlarge-169.jpg”,”height”:438},”large”:{“width”:1100,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191229130640-rs-huntsman-super-169.jpg”,”height”:619},”full16x9″:{“width”:1600,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191229130640-rs-huntsman-full-169.jpg”,”height”:900},”mini1x1″:{“width”:120,”type”:”jpg”,”uri”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191229130640-rs-huntsman-small-11.jpg”,”height”:120}}},autoStartVideo = false,isVideoReplayClicked = false,callbackObj,containerEl,currentVideoCollection = [{“title”:”Should struggling local newspapers turn into nonprofits?”,”duration”:”03:28″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:””,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/business/2019/12/29/should-struggling-local-newspapers-turn-into-nonprofits.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”business/2019/12/29/should-struggling-local-newspapers-turn-into-nonprofits.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191229130640-rs-huntsman-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/business/2019/12/29/should-struggling-local-newspapers-turn-into-nonprofits.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”Paul Huntsman, publisher and owner of the Salt Lake Tribune, tells Brian Stelter why he converted the newspaper into a non-profit organization. Huntsman says he has heard from dozens of other individuals asking “what the playbook looks like as they are looking to go down a very similar pathway with their own newspapers.””,”descriptionText”:”Paul Huntsman, publisher and owner of the Salt Lake Tribune, tells Brian Stelter why he converted the newspaper into a non-profit organization. Huntsman says he has heard from dozens of other individuals asking “what the playbook looks like as they are looking to go down a very similar pathway with their own newspapers.””},{“title”:”Watch Abby Huntsman quit ‘The View'”,”duration”:”01:00″,”sourceName”:”CNN Business”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com/2020/01/13/business/abby-huntsman-quits-the-view/index.html”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/business/2020/01/13/abby-huntsman-quits-the-view-orig.cnn-business/index.xml”,”videoId”:”business/2020/01/13/abby-huntsman-quits-the-view-orig.cnn-business”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/200113134149-abby-huntsman-quits-the-view-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/business/2020/01/13/abby-huntsman-quits-the-view-orig.cnn-business/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”In a surprise departure from the show, Abby Huntsman announced on air she is leaving “The View” to work on her father’s 2020 gubernatorial campaign.”,”descriptionText”:”In a surprise departure from the show, Abby Huntsman announced on air she is leaving “The View” to work on her father’s 2020 gubernatorial campaign.”},{“title”:”Megyn Kelly tears up watching ‘Bombshell'”,”duration”:”01:12″,”sourceName”:”CNN Business”,”sourceLink”:”http://www.cnn.com/business”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/business/2020/01/09/megyn-kelly-bombshell-reaction-orig.cnn-business/index.xml”,”videoId”:”business/2020/01/09/megyn-kelly-bombshell-reaction-orig.cnn-business”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/170618211827-sunday-night-with-megyn-kelly-photo-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/business/2020/01/09/megyn-kelly-bombshell-reaction-orig.cnn-business/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”Megyn Kelly has shared her reaction to the film “Bombshell,” which depicts Roger Ailes’ downfall at Fox News. Charlize Theron portrays Kelly in the film.”,”descriptionText”:”Megyn Kelly has shared her reaction to the film “Bombshell,” which depicts Roger Ailes’ downfall at Fox News. Charlize Theron portrays Kelly in the film.”},{“title”:”Stelter: Tucker Carlson just burst propaganda bubble on Fox”,”duration”:”01:20″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/media/2020/01/05/tucker-carlson-iran-war-fox-stelter-sot-rs-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”media/2020/01/05/tucker-carlson-iran-war-fox-stelter-sot-rs-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/190807174717-01-tucker-carlson-0807-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/media/2020/01/05/tucker-carlson-iran-war-fox-stelter-sot-rs-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”Fox News host Tucker Carlson criticized President Donald Trump’s decision to authorize the US airstrike that killed Iran’s top general Qasem Soleimani. Carlson’s commentary stood out on a network of outspoken supporters of the president and this airstrike. “,”descriptionText”:”Fox News host Tucker Carlson criticized President Donald Trump’s decision to authorize the US airstrike that killed Iran’s top general Qasem Soleimani. Carlson’s commentary stood out on a network of outspoken supporters of the president and this airstrike. “},{“title”:”Are Trump’s Iran actions motivated by media coverage?”,”duration”:”03:09″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:””,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/business/2020/01/05/are-trumps-iran-actions-motivated-by-media-coverage.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”business/2020/01/05/are-trumps-iran-actions-motivated-by-media-coverage.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/200105131729-rs-b1-paul-and-katie-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/business/2020/01/05/are-trumps-iran-actions-motivated-by-media-coverage.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”Brian Stelter cites new reporting that shows Trump is being affected by news coverage of his actions in the Middle East. Katie Rogers says Trump “has a particular aversion to coverage that makes him look weak.” Paul Rieckhoff says leaders need to “control the tone, to de-escalate and in order to do that we have to be thoughtful, we have to be measured, we have to be clear-headed — all the things that Trump is generally not.””,”descriptionText”:”Brian Stelter cites new reporting that shows Trump is being affected by news coverage of his actions in the Middle East. Katie Rogers says Trump “has a particular aversion to coverage that makes him look weak.” Paul Rieckhoff says leaders need to “control the tone, to de-escalate and in order to do that we have to be thoughtful, we have to be measured, we have to be clear-headed — all the things that Trump is generally not.””},{“title”:”Top 9 media stories of 2019″,”duration”:”08:11″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:””,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/business/2019/12/23/top-media-stories-of-2019.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”business/2019/12/23/top-media-stories-of-2019.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191223102723-top-media-stories-of-2019-00001024-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/business/2019/12/23/top-media-stories-of-2019.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”A misinformation minefield feeding a war on truth. CNN’s Brian Stelter counts down the top 9 media stories of 2019.”,”descriptionText”:”A misinformation minefield feeding a war on truth. CNN’s Brian Stelter counts down the top 9 media stories of 2019.”},{“title”:”‘SNL’ takes on the Democratic debate”,”duration”:”01:19″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”http://www.cnn.com”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/media/2019/12/22/snl-democratic-debate-impeachment.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”media/2019/12/22/snl-democratic-debate-impeachment.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191221234636-snl-debate-2-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/media/2019/12/22/snl-democratic-debate-impeachment.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:””Saturday Night Live” chose to split the difference and focused itsu003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/2019/12/22/media/saturday-night-live-democratic-debate/index.html” target=”_blank”> cold open on the latest Democratic debate u003c/a>as well as the impeachment of President Donald Trump.”,”descriptionText”:””Saturday Night Live” chose to split the difference and focused itsu003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/2019/12/22/media/saturday-night-live-democratic-debate/index.html” target=”_blank”> cold open on the latest Democratic debate u003c/a>as well as the impeachment of President Donald Trump.”},{“title”:”See star portray Aretha Franklin in new biopic trailer”,”duration”:”00:37″,”sourceName”:”HLN “,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com/specials/videos/hln”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/media/2019/12/21/aretha-franklin-movie-trailer-jennifer-hudson-wxp-vpx.hln/index.xml”,”videoId”:”media/2019/12/21/aretha-franklin-movie-trailer-jennifer-hudson-wxp-vpx.hln”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191221103243-jennifer-hudson-aretha-franklin-biopic-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/media/2019/12/21/aretha-franklin-movie-trailer-jennifer-hudson-wxp-vpx.hln/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”Catch a first glimpse of Jennifer Hudson in the role of Aretha Franklin in a trailer for the upcoming biopic, “Respect.” The late “Queen of Soul” handpicked Hudson to portray her.”,”descriptionText”:”Catch a first glimpse of Jennifer Hudson in the role of Aretha Franklin in a trailer for the upcoming biopic, “Respect.” The late “Queen of Soul” handpicked Hudson to portray her.”},{“title”:”Late-night has fun with final Democratic debate of the year”,”duration”:”01:20″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:””,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/media/2019/12/20/democratic-debate-pbs-late-night-zw-orig.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”media/2019/12/20/democratic-debate-pbs-late-night-zw-orig.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191219225743-trevor-noah-daily-show-democratic-debate-6-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/media/2019/12/20/democratic-debate-pbs-late-night-zw-orig.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”Late-night hosts Jimmy Fallon, Trevor Noah and Stephen Colbert reacted to the final Democratic debate of 2019.”,”descriptionText”:”Late-night hosts Jimmy Fallon, Trevor Noah and Stephen Colbert reacted to the final Democratic debate of 2019.”},{“title”:”Theron explains how she became Megyn Kelly for ‘Bombshell'”,”duration”:”01:51″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com/business”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/media/2019/12/17/charlize-theron-megyn-kelly-bombshell-movie-fox-news-newday-camerota-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”media/2019/12/17/charlize-theron-megyn-kelly-bombshell-movie-fox-news-newday-camerota-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191217092055-charlize-theron-newday-intv-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/media/2019/12/17/charlize-theron-megyn-kelly-bombshell-movie-fox-news-newday-camerota-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”Actress Charlize Theron explains how she prepared to portray former Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly for the movie “Bombshell.” “,”descriptionText”:”Actress Charlize Theron explains how she prepared to portray former Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly for the movie “Bombshell.” “},{“title”:”Late-night reacts to House voting to impeach Trump”,”duration”:”01:40″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”http://www.cnn.com”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/media/2019/12/19/trump-impeachment-late-night-zw-orig.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”media/2019/12/19/trump-impeachment-late-night-zw-orig.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191218231721-the-daily-show-trevor-noah-late-night-trump-impeach-nancy-pelosi-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/media/2019/12/19/trump-impeachment-late-night-zw-orig.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”Late-night hosts Samantha Bee, Trevor Noah, Stephen Colbert and Jimmy Fallon reacted to the House of Representatives voting to impeach President Trump.”,”descriptionText”:”Late-night hosts Samantha Bee, Trevor Noah, Stephen Colbert and Jimmy Fallon reacted to the House of Representatives voting to impeach President Trump.”},{“title”:”Talking impeachment during the holiday dinner on ‘SNL'”,”duration”:”01:48″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”http://www.cnn.com”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/media/2019/12/15/snl-holiday-dinner-impeachment-greata-thunberg-orig.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”media/2019/12/15/snl-holiday-dinner-impeachment-greata-thunberg-orig.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191215005053-snl-cold-open-snow-man-tump-impeach-5-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/media/2019/12/15/snl-holiday-dinner-impeachment-greata-thunberg-orig.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:””Saturday Night Live” took audiences inside people’s homes to see how many are talking about impeachment of President Donald Trump during the holidays.”,”descriptionText”:””Saturday Night Live” took audiences inside people’s homes to see how many are talking about impeachment of President Donald Trump during the holidays.”},{“title”:”NYT Editorial Board says they support Trump’s impeachment”,”duration”:”01:12″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com/”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/media/2019/12/15/nyt-editorial-board-supports-trump-impeachment-sot-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”media/2019/12/15/nyt-editorial-board-supports-trump-impeachment-sot-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191212123739-01-trump-wh-1212-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/media/2019/12/15/nyt-editorial-board-supports-trump-impeachment-sot-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”The New York Times Editorial Board published that they are in support of the impeachment of President Donald Trump, joining newspapers like the Washington Post, USA Today, and others. CNN’s Brian Stelter reports.”,”descriptionText”:”The New York Times Editorial Board published that they are in support of the impeachment of President Donald Trump, joining newspapers like the Washington Post, USA Today, and others. CNN’s Brian Stelter reports.”},{“title”:”These kids’ questions stump ‘Star Wars’ stars”,”duration”:”01:32″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”http://www.cnn.com/”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/media/2019/12/17/young-star-wars-fans-questions-cast-director-late-night-laughs-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”media/2019/12/17/young-star-wars-fans-questions-cast-director-late-night-laughs-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191217054003-star-wars-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/media/2019/12/17/young-star-wars-fans-questions-cast-director-late-night-laughs-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:””Jimmy Kimmel Live” decided to give children a chance to ask questions of “Star Wars” director J.J. Abrams and stars Daisy Ridley, John Boyega, among others. “,”descriptionText”:””Jimmy Kimmel Live” decided to give children a chance to ask questions of “Star Wars” director J.J. Abrams and stars Daisy Ridley, John Boyega, among others. “},{“title”:”Hallmark Channel pulls ad showing lesbian wedding”,”duration”:”03:19″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com/?refresh=1″,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/media/2019/12/15/hallmark-lesbian-couple-commercial-boycott-nr-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”media/2019/12/15/hallmark-lesbian-couple-commercial-boycott-nr-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191215134701-hallmark-same-sex-advertisement-backlash-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/media/2019/12/15/hallmark-lesbian-couple-commercial-boycott-nr-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”The Hallmark Channel is facing calls for viewers and advertisers to boycott its television channel and other areas of business after it pulled advertisements featuring same-sex couples from the air.”,”descriptionText”:”The Hallmark Channel is facing calls for viewers and advertisers to boycott its television channel and other areas of business after it pulled advertisements featuring same-sex couples from the air.”},{“title”:”Gretchen Carlson on ending cover-up culture “,”duration”:”02:12″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com/”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/media/2019/12/15/gretchen-carlson-fox-news-stelter-reliable-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”media/2019/12/15/gretchen-carlson-fox-news-stelter-reliable-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191215115756-gretchen-carlson-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/media/2019/12/15/gretchen-carlson-fox-news-stelter-reliable-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”Former Fox News anchorwoman Gretchen Carlson discusses her new initiative, after winning a u003ca href=”https://money.cnn.com/2016/09/06/media/gretchen-carlson-fox-news-lawsuit-settled/index.html” target=”_blank”>multi-million dollar settlementu003c/a> in a lawsuit against Roger Ailes alleging harassment and retaliation.”,”descriptionText”:”Former Fox News anchorwoman Gretchen Carlson discusses her new initiative, after winning a u003ca href=”https://money.cnn.com/2016/09/06/media/gretchen-carlson-fox-news-lawsuit-settled/index.html” target=”_blank”>multi-million dollar settlementu003c/a> in a lawsuit against Roger Ailes alleging harassment and retaliation.”}],currentVideoCollectionId = ”,isLivePlayer = false,mediaMetadataCallbacks,mobilePinnedView = null,moveToNextTimeout,mutePlayerEnabled = false,nextVideoId = ”,nextVideoUrl = ”,turnOnFlashMessaging = false,videoPinner,videoEndSlateImpl;if (CNN.autoPlayVideoExist === false) {autoStartVideo = true;if (autoStartVideo === true) {if (turnOnFlashMessaging === true) {autoStartVideo = false;containerEl = jQuery(document.getElementById(configObj.markupId));CNN.VideoPlayer.showFlashSlate(containerEl);} else {CNN.autoPlayVideoExist = true;}}}configObj.autostart = CNN.Features.enableAutoplayBlock ? false : autoStartVideo;CNN.VideoPlayer.setPlayerProperties(configObj.markupId, autoStartVideo, isLivePlayer, isVideoReplayClicked, mutePlayerEnabled);CNN.VideoPlayer.setFirstVideoInCollection(currentVideoCollection, configObj.markupId);var videoHandler = {},isFeaturedVideoCollectionHandlerAvailable = (CNN !== undefined &&CNN.VIDEOCLIENT !== undefined &&CNN.VIDEOCLIENT.FeaturedVideoCollectionHandler !== undefined);if (!isFeaturedVideoCollectionHandlerAvailable) {CNN.INJECTOR.executeFeature(‘videx’).done(function () {jQuery.ajax({dataType: ‘script’,cache: true,url: ‘//www.i.cdn.cnn.com/.a/2.183.1/js/featured-video-collection-player.min.js’}).done(function () {initializeVideoAndCollection();}).fail(function () {throw ‘Unable to fetch /js/featured-video-collection-player.min.js’;});}).fail(function () {throw ‘Unable to fetch the videx bundle’;});}function initializeVideoAndCollection() {videoHandler = new CNN.VIDEOCLIENT.FeaturedVideoCollectionHandler(configObj.markupId,”cn-featured-29ayjp3″,’js-video_description-featured-29ayjp3′,[{“title”:”Should struggling local newspapers turn into nonprofits?”,”duration”:”03:28″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:””,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/business/2019/12/29/should-struggling-local-newspapers-turn-into-nonprofits.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”business/2019/12/29/should-struggling-local-newspapers-turn-into-nonprofits.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191229130640-rs-huntsman-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/business/2019/12/29/should-struggling-local-newspapers-turn-into-nonprofits.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”Paul Huntsman, publisher and owner of the Salt Lake Tribune, tells Brian Stelter why he converted the newspaper into a non-profit organization. Huntsman says he has heard from dozens of other individuals asking “what the playbook looks like as they are looking to go down a very similar pathway with their own newspapers.””,”descriptionText”:”Paul Huntsman, publisher and owner of the Salt Lake Tribune, tells Brian Stelter why he converted the newspaper into a non-profit organization. Huntsman says he has heard from dozens of other individuals asking “what the playbook looks like as they are looking to go down a very similar pathway with their own newspapers.””},{“title”:”Watch Abby Huntsman quit ‘The View'”,”duration”:”01:00″,”sourceName”:”CNN Business”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com/2020/01/13/business/abby-huntsman-quits-the-view/index.html”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/business/2020/01/13/abby-huntsman-quits-the-view-orig.cnn-business/index.xml”,”videoId”:”business/2020/01/13/abby-huntsman-quits-the-view-orig.cnn-business”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/200113134149-abby-huntsman-quits-the-view-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/business/2020/01/13/abby-huntsman-quits-the-view-orig.cnn-business/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”In a surprise departure from the show, Abby Huntsman announced on air she is leaving “The View” to work on her father’s 2020 gubernatorial campaign.”,”descriptionText”:”In a surprise departure from the show, Abby Huntsman announced on air she is leaving “The View” to work on her father’s 2020 gubernatorial campaign.”},{“title”:”Megyn Kelly tears up watching ‘Bombshell'”,”duration”:”01:12″,”sourceName”:”CNN Business”,”sourceLink”:”http://www.cnn.com/business”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/business/2020/01/09/megyn-kelly-bombshell-reaction-orig.cnn-business/index.xml”,”videoId”:”business/2020/01/09/megyn-kelly-bombshell-reaction-orig.cnn-business”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/170618211827-sunday-night-with-megyn-kelly-photo-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/business/2020/01/09/megyn-kelly-bombshell-reaction-orig.cnn-business/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”Megyn Kelly has shared her reaction to the film “Bombshell,” which depicts Roger Ailes’ downfall at Fox News. Charlize Theron portrays Kelly in the film.”,”descriptionText”:”Megyn Kelly has shared her reaction to the film “Bombshell,” which depicts Roger Ailes’ downfall at Fox News. Charlize Theron portrays Kelly in the film.”},{“title”:”Stelter: Tucker Carlson just burst propaganda bubble on Fox”,”duration”:”01:20″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/media/2020/01/05/tucker-carlson-iran-war-fox-stelter-sot-rs-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”media/2020/01/05/tucker-carlson-iran-war-fox-stelter-sot-rs-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/190807174717-01-tucker-carlson-0807-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/media/2020/01/05/tucker-carlson-iran-war-fox-stelter-sot-rs-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”Fox News host Tucker Carlson criticized President Donald Trump’s decision to authorize the US airstrike that killed Iran’s top general Qasem Soleimani. Carlson’s commentary stood out on a network of outspoken supporters of the president and this airstrike. “,”descriptionText”:”Fox News host Tucker Carlson criticized President Donald Trump’s decision to authorize the US airstrike that killed Iran’s top general Qasem Soleimani. Carlson’s commentary stood out on a network of outspoken supporters of the president and this airstrike. “},{“title”:”Are Trump’s Iran actions motivated by media coverage?”,”duration”:”03:09″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:””,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/business/2020/01/05/are-trumps-iran-actions-motivated-by-media-coverage.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”business/2020/01/05/are-trumps-iran-actions-motivated-by-media-coverage.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/200105131729-rs-b1-paul-and-katie-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/business/2020/01/05/are-trumps-iran-actions-motivated-by-media-coverage.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”Brian Stelter cites new reporting that shows Trump is being affected by news coverage of his actions in the Middle East. Katie Rogers says Trump “has a particular aversion to coverage that makes him look weak.” Paul Rieckhoff says leaders need to “control the tone, to de-escalate and in order to do that we have to be thoughtful, we have to be measured, we have to be clear-headed — all the things that Trump is generally not.””,”descriptionText”:”Brian Stelter cites new reporting that shows Trump is being affected by news coverage of his actions in the Middle East. Katie Rogers says Trump “has a particular aversion to coverage that makes him look weak.” Paul Rieckhoff says leaders need to “control the tone, to de-escalate and in order to do that we have to be thoughtful, we have to be measured, we have to be clear-headed — all the things that Trump is generally not.””},{“title”:”Top 9 media stories of 2019″,”duration”:”08:11″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:””,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/business/2019/12/23/top-media-stories-of-2019.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”business/2019/12/23/top-media-stories-of-2019.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191223102723-top-media-stories-of-2019-00001024-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/business/2019/12/23/top-media-stories-of-2019.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”A misinformation minefield feeding a war on truth. CNN’s Brian Stelter counts down the top 9 media stories of 2019.”,”descriptionText”:”A misinformation minefield feeding a war on truth. CNN’s Brian Stelter counts down the top 9 media stories of 2019.”},{“title”:”‘SNL’ takes on the Democratic debate”,”duration”:”01:19″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”http://www.cnn.com”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/media/2019/12/22/snl-democratic-debate-impeachment.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”media/2019/12/22/snl-democratic-debate-impeachment.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191221234636-snl-debate-2-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/media/2019/12/22/snl-democratic-debate-impeachment.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:””Saturday Night Live” chose to split the difference and focused itsu003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/2019/12/22/media/saturday-night-live-democratic-debate/index.html” target=”_blank”> cold open on the latest Democratic debate u003c/a>as well as the impeachment of President Donald Trump.”,”descriptionText”:””Saturday Night Live” chose to split the difference and focused itsu003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/2019/12/22/media/saturday-night-live-democratic-debate/index.html” target=”_blank”> cold open on the latest Democratic debate u003c/a>as well as the impeachment of President Donald Trump.”},{“title”:”See star portray Aretha Franklin in new biopic trailer”,”duration”:”00:37″,”sourceName”:”HLN “,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com/specials/videos/hln”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/media/2019/12/21/aretha-franklin-movie-trailer-jennifer-hudson-wxp-vpx.hln/index.xml”,”videoId”:”media/2019/12/21/aretha-franklin-movie-trailer-jennifer-hudson-wxp-vpx.hln”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191221103243-jennifer-hudson-aretha-franklin-biopic-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/media/2019/12/21/aretha-franklin-movie-trailer-jennifer-hudson-wxp-vpx.hln/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”Catch a first glimpse of Jennifer Hudson in the role of Aretha Franklin in a trailer for the upcoming biopic, “Respect.” The late “Queen of Soul” handpicked Hudson to portray her.”,”descriptionText”:”Catch a first glimpse of Jennifer Hudson in the role of Aretha Franklin in a trailer for the upcoming biopic, “Respect.” The late “Queen of Soul” handpicked Hudson to portray her.”},{“title”:”Late-night has fun with final Democratic debate of the year”,”duration”:”01:20″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:””,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/media/2019/12/20/democratic-debate-pbs-late-night-zw-orig.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”media/2019/12/20/democratic-debate-pbs-late-night-zw-orig.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191219225743-trevor-noah-daily-show-democratic-debate-6-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/media/2019/12/20/democratic-debate-pbs-late-night-zw-orig.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”Late-night hosts Jimmy Fallon, Trevor Noah and Stephen Colbert reacted to the final Democratic debate of 2019.”,”descriptionText”:”Late-night hosts Jimmy Fallon, Trevor Noah and Stephen Colbert reacted to the final Democratic debate of 2019.”},{“title”:”Theron explains how she became Megyn Kelly for ‘Bombshell'”,”duration”:”01:51″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com/business”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/media/2019/12/17/charlize-theron-megyn-kelly-bombshell-movie-fox-news-newday-camerota-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”media/2019/12/17/charlize-theron-megyn-kelly-bombshell-movie-fox-news-newday-camerota-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191217092055-charlize-theron-newday-intv-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/media/2019/12/17/charlize-theron-megyn-kelly-bombshell-movie-fox-news-newday-camerota-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”Actress Charlize Theron explains how she prepared to portray former Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly for the movie “Bombshell.” “,”descriptionText”:”Actress Charlize Theron explains how she prepared to portray former Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly for the movie “Bombshell.” “},{“title”:”Late-night reacts to House voting to impeach Trump”,”duration”:”01:40″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”http://www.cnn.com”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/media/2019/12/19/trump-impeachment-late-night-zw-orig.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”media/2019/12/19/trump-impeachment-late-night-zw-orig.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191218231721-the-daily-show-trevor-noah-late-night-trump-impeach-nancy-pelosi-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/media/2019/12/19/trump-impeachment-late-night-zw-orig.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”Late-night hosts Samantha Bee, Trevor Noah, Stephen Colbert and Jimmy Fallon reacted to the House of Representatives voting to impeach President Trump.”,”descriptionText”:”Late-night hosts Samantha Bee, Trevor Noah, Stephen Colbert and Jimmy Fallon reacted to the House of Representatives voting to impeach President Trump.”},{“title”:”Talking impeachment during the holiday dinner on ‘SNL'”,”duration”:”01:48″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”http://www.cnn.com”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/media/2019/12/15/snl-holiday-dinner-impeachment-greata-thunberg-orig.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”media/2019/12/15/snl-holiday-dinner-impeachment-greata-thunberg-orig.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191215005053-snl-cold-open-snow-man-tump-impeach-5-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/media/2019/12/15/snl-holiday-dinner-impeachment-greata-thunberg-orig.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:””Saturday Night Live” took audiences inside people’s homes to see how many are talking about impeachment of President Donald Trump during the holidays.”,”descriptionText”:””Saturday Night Live” took audiences inside people’s homes to see how many are talking about impeachment of President Donald Trump during the holidays.”},{“title”:”NYT Editorial Board says they support Trump’s impeachment”,”duration”:”01:12″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com/”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/media/2019/12/15/nyt-editorial-board-supports-trump-impeachment-sot-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”media/2019/12/15/nyt-editorial-board-supports-trump-impeachment-sot-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191212123739-01-trump-wh-1212-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/media/2019/12/15/nyt-editorial-board-supports-trump-impeachment-sot-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”The New York Times Editorial Board published that they are in support of the impeachment of President Donald Trump, joining newspapers like the Washington Post, USA Today, and others. CNN’s Brian Stelter reports.”,”descriptionText”:”The New York Times Editorial Board published that they are in support of the impeachment of President Donald Trump, joining newspapers like the Washington Post, USA Today, and others. CNN’s Brian Stelter reports.”},{“title”:”These kids’ questions stump ‘Star Wars’ stars”,”duration”:”01:32″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”http://www.cnn.com/”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/media/2019/12/17/young-star-wars-fans-questions-cast-director-late-night-laughs-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”media/2019/12/17/young-star-wars-fans-questions-cast-director-late-night-laughs-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191217054003-star-wars-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/media/2019/12/17/young-star-wars-fans-questions-cast-director-late-night-laughs-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:””Jimmy Kimmel Live” decided to give children a chance to ask questions of “Star Wars” director J.J. Abrams and stars Daisy Ridley, John Boyega, among others. “,”descriptionText”:””Jimmy Kimmel Live” decided to give children a chance to ask questions of “Star Wars” director J.J. Abrams and stars Daisy Ridley, John Boyega, among others. “},{“title”:”Hallmark Channel pulls ad showing lesbian wedding”,”duration”:”03:19″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com/?refresh=1″,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/media/2019/12/15/hallmark-lesbian-couple-commercial-boycott-nr-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”media/2019/12/15/hallmark-lesbian-couple-commercial-boycott-nr-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191215134701-hallmark-same-sex-advertisement-backlash-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/media/2019/12/15/hallmark-lesbian-couple-commercial-boycott-nr-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”The Hallmark Channel is facing calls for viewers and advertisers to boycott its television channel and other areas of business after it pulled advertisements featuring same-sex couples from the air.”,”descriptionText”:”The Hallmark Channel is facing calls for viewers and advertisers to boycott its television channel and other areas of business after it pulled advertisements featuring same-sex couples from the air.”},{“title”:”Gretchen Carlson on ending cover-up culture “,”duration”:”02:12″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com/”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/media/2019/12/15/gretchen-carlson-fox-news-stelter-reliable-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”media/2019/12/15/gretchen-carlson-fox-news-stelter-reliable-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/191215115756-gretchen-carlson-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/media/2019/12/15/gretchen-carlson-fox-news-stelter-reliable-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/business-media/”,”description”:”Former Fox News anchorwoman Gretchen Carlson discusses her new initiative, after winning a u003ca href=”https://money.cnn.com/2016/09/06/media/gretchen-carlson-fox-news-lawsuit-settled/index.html” target=”_blank”>multi-million dollar settlementu003c/a> in a lawsuit against Roger Ailes alleging harassment and retaliation.”,”descriptionText”:”Former Fox News anchorwoman Gretchen Carlson discusses her new initiative, after winning a u003ca href=”https://money.cnn.com/2016/09/06/media/gretchen-carlson-fox-news-lawsuit-settled/index.html” target=”_blank”>multi-million dollar settlementu003c/a> in a lawsuit against Roger Ailes alleging harassment and retaliation.”}],’js-video_headline-featured-29ayjp3′,”,”js-video_source-featured-29ayjp3″,true,true,’business-media’);if (typeof configObj.context !== ‘string’ || configObj.context.length



Source link

lat-logo-dark-full.jpg

9/11 plotter will face CIA psychologists in court…


For the first time, the military commission that is preparing to try Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, who is accused of planning the 9/11 attacks, will focus almost exclusively on a subject that for years wasn’t allowed to be mentioned in the courtroom: torture.

On Tuesday, Mohammed is expected — also for the first time — to be in the same room with two CIA psychologists who, his lawyers say, tortured him. The encounter will occur at the start of the 40th series of pretrial hearings for Mohammed and four other defendants charged in the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, in which hijacked jetliners were crashed into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, killing 2,973 people and altering the course of history.

The five defendants were all captured in 2002 or 2003 and held in secret prisons overseas until they arrived at Guantánamo in late 2006. Mohammed, now 55, was captured in Pakistan then taken to Afghanistan, Poland and Romania before being moved to Guantánamo. He was subjected to waterboarding and other brutal methods of interrogation that have now been the source of controversy across three presidencies.

The Obama administration had hoped to try Mohammed in federal court in Manhattan, but the plan was dropped after Congress passed a law prohibiting the federal government from spending money transporting prisoners from the Navy brig at Guantánamo to the mainland United States.

He now faces trial before a military commission here. The trial is scheduled to start in January 2021 — nearly 20 years after the attacks.

The prohibition on discussion of torture began to erode when the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence released a summary of its examination of the so-called CIA black sites in 2014.

Defense lawyers are seeking to bar confessions that all five defendants gave to FBI interviewers, called clean teams, in 2007; “I was responsible for the 9/11 operation, from A to Z,” Mohammed is said to have told a military tribunal at the time. The prosecution has said those confessions are untainted by the prior torture and key elements in their case.

James Mitchell and John “Bruce” Jessen, the psychologists who devised the Central Intelligence Agency’s so-called enhanced interrogation program, have been called to provide testimony.

What the defense teams hope to gain from Mitchell and Jessen’s testimony are not solely the facts of how the interrogations were conducted, but to show that the FBI cooperated with the CIA in the black site interrogations and that that sort of compliance did not end when the torture did. Mitchell has contended that his techniques induced compliance, a “learned helplessness,” but said that the condition ends over time.

David Nevin, an attorney for Mohammed, calls that assertion “dishonorable.”

“You torture someone for three and a half years and then you have a break and you take them to a new place and you say, ‘Now we’d like to ask you some more questions,’ ” Nevin said in an interview. “We have some other people here who want to do that. The question is: Are those statements in any real meaningful sense, in the terms in U.S. law, an act of free will and voluntariness? And it’s really almost laughable to even ask the question. Those are clearly coerced statements in any understanding of the law that applies to this kind of activity.”

It will be the first public testimony from Mitchell and Jessen, although Mitchell has written a book, “Enhanced Interrogation: Inside the Minds of the Terrorists Trying to Destroy America,” about the interrogation program. In it, he maintains that they did not torture because they did not inflect sufficient pain or irreparable damage to the men subjected to them.

In addition to Mohammed, the defendants are his nephew Ammar Baluchi, Ramzi bin Shibh, Mustafa Hawsawi and Khallad bin Attash. The first three are accused of assisting Mohammed with the logistics of the 9/11 plot; Hawsawi is accused of training some of the hijackers.

In what by now has become a typical Guantánamo quirk, the prosecution last week issued a new set of rules declaring what is or isn’t classified material affecting the case. One result is that some of the information in the public files of the case is now classified, years after it was revealed in open court.

Another result is that several books, including Mitchell’s, which was published in 2016, are also now considered classified, according to James G. Connell III, a defense attorney. He likened it to turning a fruit basket upside down.

The current judge, Air Force Col. W. Shane Cohen, is the fifth assigned to the case. There have been dozens of attorneys involved, a mix of civilians and military. The hearings have gone on so long several military lawyers have retired. A few have come back as civilians.

The case docket has more than 8,600 filings. Shockingly few of these have to do with the crimes the five defendants are accused of committing — the murders of almost 3,000 people.

At various points in time defense lawyers have argued they were not qualified to defend their clients; translators have interrupted lawyers to insist that they be quiet; defendants have refused to answer any questions from the judge or even acknowledge they’d been asked; they have interrupted the proceedings to pray or complain they were being attacked by invisible rays.

There is a weirdness to Guantánamo that seems to affect everything and everyone who spends any time there. Just this month, a former base commander was tried for covering up the death (and possible murder) of his lover’s husband. The case began when the dead husband’s body was found floating in the bay.

The hearings are held in a corner of the Navy base within what is called the Expeditionary Legal Complex, which has a prefab feel to it, surrounded by cyclone fences, braided with coiled razor wire, and watched by heavily armed guards. Guard towers rise in the morning like Star Wars robots before court commences. The courtroom itself is huge, with separate tables for each of the defense teams.

The walkways leading to the court are a winding obstacle course. Roads leading to the complex are littered with crash-resistant barriers. Passports are required for entry and exit to the court, even though access to the naval base is tightly controlled and nonmilitary personnel cannot move about without escorts.

The Navy base itself is an oddity, a 45-square-mile bit of America-controlled territory in southeastern Cuba, a spoil of the Spanish American War. Theodore Roosevelt and Cuba signed a lease for the base shortly after that war ended. The lease is perpetual and can only be terminated by mutual agreement. The U.S. pays an annual “rent” of $4,085. For decades, Fidel Castro refused to cash the checks.

The system under which the hearings are held, called a military commission, employs a combination of features from the federal courts, military courts martial and ad hoc rules and procedures devised along the way.

The combination has yielded a procedural mess. It’s less like a federal criminal trial than a slow-motion circus. To wit:

• The FBI several years ago placed an informant on one of the defense teams.

• It was determined that someone, probably within the CIA, monitors the proceedings in real time and once shut down a hearing because of a presumed danger of classified information being revealed.

• Listening devices were found in a room where defense attorneys meet with their clients. One of those meeting rooms, it was discovered last year, was part of a former black site.

• The Marine general who heads the defense teams was placed under house arrest last year.

• A black site the court had ordered to be preserved as potential evidence was destroyed.

• Several people the prosecution intended to call as witnesses have died.

• The entire court travels together in a charter aircraft for the hearings; in 2017 their flight nearly crashed landing in a heavy wind.

• Because the crimes carry a potential death penalty sentence, each of the lead attorneys for the defendants has to have experience trying capital cases. An entire slate of hearings had to be canceled because one of those attorneys broke her arm and couldn’t travel.

• Defense lawyers are unable to talk with their clients about anything the government decides is classified. For years, this included all issues having to do with the prisoners’ treatment past or present. Anything that happened to the defendants while in American custody was considered presumptively classified.

This is a heavily edited selection form a very long list of oddities. The ultimate strangeness is the substance of the proceedings themselves. There is little doubt that KSM is guilty of planning and managing the attacks of 9/11 and several other attacks different and less horrible only in scale. His guilt will not be argued at trial. Instead, the trial and the pre-trial that has preceded it for years will be focused not on what he has done but on what was done to him as a result.

Terry McDermott, a Times reporter from 1998 to 2009, is the co-author of “The Hunt for KSM: Inside the Pursuit and Takedown of the Real 9/11 Mastermind, Khalid Sheikh Mohammed.”



Source link