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While Jim Jordan toured the inside of a small Queen Anne Style house that President Warren G. Harding once called home, a crowd gathered outside and demanded an unscheduled audience. Not one to disappoint, the Ohio Republican acquiesced.

For about an hour, Jordan stood on the 29th president’s front porch, answering questions on everything from climate change to the Affordable Care Act. It was an impromptu town hall, a GOP primer on crowd control, and according to Jordan, “Democracy in action.”

No doubt, that’s not what the activists had in mind when they planned the ambush. Across the country, a group called “Indivisible” has organized hundreds of demonstrations, crashed apolitical constituent service days, and hijacked town halls. The groundswell has left Republicans shell-shocked and rattled.

But not Jordan. The former House Freedom Caucus chairman told the Washington Examiner the whole movement “is great” and that he “loves things like this.”

Today, politicians use cheery sounding buzzwords like dialogue to describe their scripted exchanges with constituents during the occasional jaunt back to the district. At the same time, everyone else decries the lack of civility in politics. Jordan actually achieved both. Video by the Washington Post’s Dave Weigel shows a scene more fitting to Harding’s 20th century than Trump’s 2017.

While a few conservative supporters showed up to cheer Jordan, the congressman stuck mostly with questions from the opposition. “Even people I disagree with still have this wonderful thing called the First Amendment,” Jordan says over the phone. “I tried to take as many questions and stick to people who were against me.”

A few times, things got heated. There were a couple of protesters who just yelled, the stereotypical activists who disguise speeches as questions. And at one point, Jordan’s 2018 challenger, Democrat Janet Garrett, shouted down the congressman over a bullhorn. For the most part though, Midwest nice carried the day.

Others haven’t been so lucky recently. In Utah, shrieking protesters wouldn’t let Rep. Jason Chaffetz get a word in during his regularly scheduled town hall. In California, police had to escort Rep. Tom McClintock after a rowdy constituent meet-and-greet.

That’s led at least two GOP congressmen to say no thanks. Both Rep. John Duncan of Tennessee and Sen. Thom Tillis of North Carolina have skipped the events. It’s made an already disorganized GOP Congress appear even more in retreat.

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But Jordan didn’t show any signs of fatigue Monday. The Ohio Republican seemed invigorated after his experience with old-timey front porch politics. “It was a good session,” he says. “I think it was 45 minutes or so. I’d do it again.”

Philip Wegmann is a commentary writer for the Washington Examiner.

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