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Vice President-elect Mike Pence’s visit to Louisiana Saturday to campaign for John Kennedy in the US Senate runoff election underscored the difference between how seriously Republicans and Democrats are taking that race.

National Republicans want the seat, which would give them a 52-48 majority in the Senate if Kennedy prevails on December 10, and are actively campaigning for it.

National Democrats have largely written the race off off, leaving activists and celebrities who want to set back a new Trump administration to fill the void. And not without reason.

Kennedy and Democratic opponent Foster Campbell came in as the top two candidates in an incredibly crowded field on November 8. Kennedy took 25 percent of the vote to Campbell’s 17.5 percent.

Yet all the Republicans in the race taken together got over 75 percent of the vote, and Donald Trump carried the state by 20 points.

That means Foster has a lot of electoral ground to make up, too much ground in the estimation of most national Democrats. He has to get to 50 percent plus one to win the vote, according to Louisiana election rules.

While national Republicans and Republican organizations are getting Kennedy’s back, the cash strapped Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee has left Campbell largely on his own.

Online activism has managed to put about a million dollars more into Campbell’s coffers than Kennedy’s after November 8, but that doesn’t seem to be making a huge dent locally.

“The runoff is kind of a nothing burger,” said Seattle to New Orleans transplant Eric Earling to the Washington Examiner. “Yeah, obligatory TV ads and signs of doorbelling but the race is a foregone conclusion. It’s very low energy, especially compared to the chaotic, big field fighting for those final spots before November 8.”

It's a bird, it's a plane, it's...

Also from the Washington Examiner

After telling the press she would be going to a heroes and villains costume party on Long Island as incoming White House strategist Steve Bannon, Trump campaign manager Kellyanne Conway instead showed up as Supergirl.

Honoring the ultimate hero at the Mercer "Heroes and Villians" party on Long Island. Crowd thrilled w/ surprise! pic.twitter.com/VQAyaKvs6i— Kellyanne Conway (@KellyannePolls) December 4, 2016

Conway also brought with her another surprise guest: President-elect Donald Trump, dressed as himself. She had told the press that he wouldn’t attend, perhaps to help protect his secret identity.

The party was held at the Owl’s Nest, the sprawling Long Island estate of hedge

12/03/16 10:42 PM

James Plummer, a policy analyst and freelance writer based in New Orleans, thinks Campbell has a chance but a small one.

“Campbell’s chances are not very good,” Plummer said Saturday. “We recently elected a Democrat governor, but his opponent Senator Vitter was embroiled in a messy sex scandal and the electorate was wary of more cuts to education and health care after eight years of Republican Bobby Jindal as governor.”

He estimates that state treasurer Kennedy is a different kind of candidate in a different kind of election.

“Even though Campbell – like [Democratic governor John Bel] Edwards – is running as pro-life and pro-gun, those pro-welfare related issues aren’t as tangible at the national level, especially since John N. Kennedy isn’t running on a Paul Ryan-style platform of entitlement reform.”

Plummer grants that Campbell “has been raising a lot of national money from celebrities and social-media users for his campaign, and a Campbell SuperPAC has as well. They are both advertising a lot, but I don’t think I’ve seen any ads at all from the DNC or the DSCC.”

Green Party drops Pennsylvania recount

Also from the Washington Examiner

Jill Stein’s Green Party dropped one of the last hurdles to Donald Trump becoming president Saturday by failing to put up a $1 million bond to finance a statewide recount.

The Green Party-backed Pennsylvania voters who were pressing the case withdrew it on Saturday, citing money concerns. They would have to come up with $1 million by 5 p.m. Monday, the day a court ruling was expected. Instead, they withdrew the case and thereby canceled any recount.

Dropping the complaint was an odd call because the Green Party had raised almost $7 million to finance recounts in Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin, which should have been more than enough to cover the bond bill.

12/03/16 9:36 PM

That doesn’t mean that local Democrats have written Campbell off, however, or that he isn’t determined to put up a major fight against Kennedy. Louisiana Governor Edwards has endorsed and campaigned hard for Campbell as have many local prominent Democrats in what is far from a one-party state.

Campbell continues to try to insult, goad and trip up Kennedy as a party-switching flip-flopper who doesn’t deserve the people’s vote. “He’s been a Democrat. He’s been a Republican. John Kennedy’s been everything but a Baptist preacher,” Campbell mocked in interview with Politico.

Campbell has been needling Kennedy relentlessly over his refusal to take part in a runoff debate, calling him No Show Neely, after Kennedy’s middle name. His campaign has also been working hard to bring in the early votes, which cut off after this Sunday.

Still, Campbell faces a significant struggle, against a huge polling lead, a popular president-elect and a reasonably well known and inoffensive opponent. He has pitched himself as a reliable “no” vote against Donald Trump and the Republican Party to an electorate that has been trending the other way.

Green Party drops out of Pennsylvania recount

Top Story

Jill Stein’s Green Party dropped one of the last hurdles to Donald Trump becoming president Saturday by failing to put up a $1 million bond to finance a statewide recount.

The Green Party-backed Pennsylvania voters who were pressing the case withdrew it on Saturday, citing money concerns. They would have to come up with $1 million by 5 p.m. Monday, the day a court ruling was expected. Instead, they withdrew the case and thereby canceled any recount.

Dropping the complaint was an odd call because the Green Party had raised almost $7 million to finance recounts in Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin, which should have been more than enough to cover the bond bill.

12/03/16 9:36 PM



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