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A leading Republican critic of Obamacare expressed doubt Wednesday that his colleagues would be able to agree on a replacement to the law at the same time they repeal it.

“I don’t know that that is the trajectory that is going to be followed,” Rep. Mike Burgess, R-Texas, told the Washington Examiner.

Republicans are currently sorting through different scenarios for repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act. They’re contemplating using special budgeting rules to repeal the healthcare law, possibly before the inauguration so they could have it ready to hand to President-elect Donald Trump to sign.

But it’s unclear whether or how they might replace it. A plan laid out by House Speaker Paul Ryan over the summer is a blueprint, although it’s traditionally been difficult for Republicans to unify around health reform.

And even their goal of repealing the healthcare law is threatened to be complicated by demands from the Heritage Foundation, which wants Congress to try to repeal all of the law instead of just its biggest parts. Many Hill aides don’t believe budgeting rules can be used to repeal the law’s insurer regulations.

Burgess said rank-and-file lawmakers aren’t privy to the strategizing, which is mainly taking place within the Budget Committee and within leadership. But the questions might be discussed more broadly at a Republican conference meeting scheduled for Thursday.

Burgess said the Ryan plan is a good starting point for replacement discussions. He said he’d like to see two goals guide Republicans: lowering costs and reducing government involvement.

“Everywhere you go, people are mad because their insurance costs too much,” he said. “They don’t want it to cost so much and they don’t want the government to keep messing with it, so those are the two guiding principles.”

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