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A conservative push to remake clean energy in the GOP’s image won a sizable victory with the election of Donald Trump on Tuesday.

The group ClearPath Action, founded and led by conservative philanthropist Jay Faison, saw nearly all the down-ballot Republicans it endorsed and supported win on Tuesday, proving that clean energy can be a platform for Republicans to win.

Faison told the Washington Examiner, with the election over, his focus is turning to the Trump transition team to help it figure out where it stands on clean energy, which for him includes nuclear power, hydropower, natural gas, clean coal with carbon capture and advanced energy technologies.

“Well, we’ve worked with their policy team a little bit on things like nuclear and how that fits into their policy set, and I know there is a foothold,” Faison said. “I know that there is a policy that they’re going to be interested in. And we in the clean energy side from a Republican standpoint, there’s not a lot of other groups working on this,” he said.

“I feel we can add value to their policy positions, and I feel like if we can get a stronger nuclear industry, a stronger hydropower industry those are going to be good for clean energy,” Faison added. “And what other opportunities will arise, I don’t know, but we’re prepared and equipped to help and intend to do so.”

ClearPath supports conservative clean energy that produces little or no emissions, but does not include solar or wind that rely on government spending and tax credits to compete. Hydroelectric power is renewable, but it is a competitive source of baseload power that can provide electricity 24 hours a day, as opposed to solar and wind that cannot.

The Republican platform that was agreed to when Trump was nominated in the summer contains a plank that supports energy very close to what Faison’s group supports. The platform refutes the need for excessive regulations to drive along clean energy development, which the Obama administration has used to pick winners and losers, critics say.

The policy outlook Faison wants to push with the new administration is one of technology over regulation and innovation over federal subsidy, which in turn could be the basis for a GOP climate change strategy.

“The government has a role to play in our technology innovation, and we think that technology innovation is what is required to decarbonize in a cost-effective way that builds jobs, export markets,” while cleaning up the air, “and by the way, also lowers carbon emissions,” he said.

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Trump has hinted at being open to a technology innovation policy, Faison noted. He has said “not a lot, but a little bit,” but he has a lot of “smart people working on policy right now and we’re hopeful a lot of these good ideas make it in there.”

Faison’s ideas resemble those from President George W. Bush’s presidency, where government investment in more efficient technologies was the way to a climate change policy, not through regulations meant to force emission reductions and drive up costs.

“We don’t think it is a government regulation game. We think it’s a technology innovation game,” Faison said. “We think the government should lead” through research and development at the Energy Department’s national labs, for example, which is where the drilling method known as fracking was created, he said. “And that led to much lower energy costs and an energy revolution in the United States,” he said.

On climate change, Faison thinks “it’s smart to hedge our bets around decarbonization” and that the world is already reducing its carbon emissions through new technologies. Most scientists blame greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuels for driving manmade climate change.

He admits, however, that his views may not jibe completely with some of Trump’s energy advisers. “We might disagree on the level of risk of carbon emissions, but I’m sure there are things we can agree on,” he told the Washington Examiner.

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