Month: June 2017

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At least 9 dead, 28 missing after Colombia tour boat sinks


A tourist boat packed with about 160 passengers capsized Sunday on a reservoir near the Colombian city of Medellin, leaving six people dead and 31 others missing, according to Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos.

Another 122 people were either rescued or found their way to shore, Santos said.

Rescuers including firefighters from nearby cities and air force pilots were searching for survivors at the reservoir where the El Almirante sank with about 160 passengers on board. A flotilla of recreational boats and jet skis rushed to the scene, pulling people from the boat as it went down and avoiding an even deadlier tragedy. It is not clear how the boat capsized.

TOLL IN COLOMBIA MINE EXPLOSION RISES TO 13

 

“Nobody really knows what happened,” said Santos, adding that naval officials were brought in to carry out an investigation.

POPE SEEKS TO ENCOURAGE COLOMBIAN RECONCILIATION WITH TRIP

Earlier, Margarita Moncada, the head of the disaster response agency in Antioquia state, had said that according to a preliminary nine people had been killed and around 28 were missing. The discrepancies in the number of fatalities could not immediately reconciled.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 



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'Pharma Bro' Martin Shkreli defies attorneys' advice to lay low before trial


Martin Shkreli, also known as the “Pharma Bro,” defied his attorneys’ advice to lay low before his federal securities fraud trial starts.

Shkreli, who became a pariah after raising the cost of a life-saving drug 5,000 percent, has been preening for cameras and trolling on social media, potentially complicating his defense in the trial, which begins Monday.

“I’m excited,” Shkreli said of the trial in a brief phone call last week to the Associated Press. “I can’t wait.”

Since his arrest in 2015, Shkreli has been free on bail and free to speak his mind. He went on Twitter to label members of Congress “imbeciles” for demanding to know why his company, Turing Pharmaceuticals, raised the price of Daraprim, a drug used to treat toxoplasmosis and HIV, from $13.50 to $750 per pill.

He took to YouTube for a series of lessons on chemistry and stock market analysis. His Twitter posts mocking a freelance journalist turned so creepy — one showed a fake photo of him canoodling with her — that his account was shut down. And on Facebook, he mused about the possibility of being “unjustly imprisoned.”

Though Shkreli took a ton of heat from Daraprim, the federal securities fraud case is unrelated.

Prosecutors say that after Shkreli lost millions of dollars through bad trades through his side business hedge fund, he looted a second pharmaceutical company for $11 million to pay them back. The defense has argued that he had good intentions.

“Everybody got paid back in this case,” his lawyer said. “Whatever else he did wrong, he ultimately made them whole.”

The defense has pondered putting Shkreli on the stand to highlight is rise in the industry. He wanted to develop new life-saving drugs after seeing “several classmates and other children he knew struck down by debilitating disease,” court papers say.

Prosecutors call it a ploy to portray the boyish-looking Shkreli as “a Horatio Alger-like figure who, through hard work and intelligence, is in a position to do great things if only the jury would ignore the evidence and base its verdict on sympathy.” The real Shkreli was a con man often undone by his own mouth, they say.

Prosecutors also used his boasts about some of his purchases of eccentric collectibles to undermine efforts to reduce his bail from $5 million to $2 million. If he needed to raise cash to pay legal fees and back taxes, they argued, why not sell the one-of-a-kind Wu-Tang Clan album that he brought for $2 million or his Nazi-era Engima code-breaking machine?

Also cited were his offers to pay a $100,000 bounty for finding the killer of a Democratic National Committee staffer and $40,000 in tuition for a Princeton student who solved a math problem he posed during a guest lecture at the school earlier this year.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.



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Nikki Haley says she and son were booed at NY restaurant during gay pride parade


U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley took to Twitter Sunday to claim that she and her son were heckled as they left a New York City restaurant while the city’s annual Gay Pride Parade was taking place. 

It was not immediately clear where Haley was dining or what was said to her and her son. 

Haley has been one of the most outspoken members of the Trump administration in her role as ambassador to the U.N., but some of her statements while governor of South Carolina have drawn the ire of the LGBT community. 

In November 2013, Haley opposed a federal lawsuit challening an amendment in South Carolina’s constitution that banned same-sex marriage.

“The citizens of South Carolina spoke … spoke something that I, too, believe, which is marriage should between a man and a woman,” Haley said at the time. “I’m going to stand by the people of this state, stand by the constitution, I’m going to support it and fight for it every step of the way.”

However, Haley appeared to alter her stance last year, when she delivered the Republican response to former President Barack Obama’s final State of the Union address. Haley, who endorsed Florida Sen. Marco Rubio in the Republican primaries, promised that a Republican president would “respect differences in modern families, but we would also insist on respect for religious liberty as a cornerstone of our democracy.”

Gay pride parades across the country this weekend took on political overtones, an apparent reaction to the Trump administration. 

Activists have been galled by the Trump administration’s rollback of federal guidance advising school districts to let transgender students use the bathrooms and locker rooms of their choice. The Republican president also broke from Democratic predecessor Barack Obama’s practice of issuing a proclamation in honor of Pride Month.

At the jam-packed New York City parade, a few attendees wore “Make America Gay Again” hats, while one group walking silently in the parade wore “Black Lives Matter” shirts as they held up signs with a fist and with a rainbow background, a symbol for gay pride. Still others protested potential cuts to heath care benefits, declaring that “Healthcare is an LGBT issue.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.



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'VERY SERIOUS MISTAKE' Top Dem: Obama should have done more on Russia


Rep. Adam Schiff, the top-ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, said Sunday the Obama administration should have done more to counter Russia’s meddling in the U.S. election.

“I think the administration needed to call out Russia earlier, needed to act to deter and punish Russia earlier, and that was a very serious mistake,” Schiff, of California, said in a televised interview with CNN.

Schiff added that President Barack Obama may have been worried that doing more against Russia would have looked like he was “trying to tip the scales for Hillary Clinton” and did not want to give in to the notion that the election was “rigged” against Donald Trump, according to The Hill.

President Trump criticized Obama earlier Sunday for allegedly doing “nothing” about reports that Russia interfered in last year’s presidential campaign.

“I just heard today for the first time that (former President) Obama knew about Russia a long time before the election, and he did nothing about it,” he said on “Fox & Friends Weekend.” “The CIA gave him information on Russia a long time before the election. … If he had the information, why didn’t he do something about it?”

Trump suggested the media has underreported the story, while has rigorously pursued allegations that his team colluded with Russia during the 2016 race, in which he upset Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton.

The Washington Post reported Friday that the Obama administration hesitated to act on and speak about information it was given about Russia’s interference in the election.



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TEACHER DISMISSED Prof not returning to class after Warmbier remarks


An adjunct anthropology professor at the University of Delaware who drew anger by criticizing the American college student who died being held captive in North Korea will not be returning to teach.

“Katherine Dettwyler, who last taught in the spring as an adjunct faculty member, will not be rehired to teach at the University in the future,” a statement from University of Delaware read.

Dettwyler said in a since-deleted message on Facebook and in the comments section of an article about the late college student on the website of conservative magazine, the National Review, that “Otto Warmbier got exactly what he deserved.”

“He went to North Korea, for f***’s sake, and then acted like a spoiled, naive, arrogant, US college student who had never had to face the consequences of his actions,” Dettwyler wrote. “I see him crying at his sentencing hearing and think ‘What did you expect?’

Dettwyler added: “How about a few moments of thought given to all the other people in North Korea who are suffering under the repressive government there? Just because they are North Koreans, and not US citizens, we shouldn’t care about them?”

Warmbier, a student at the University of Virginia, was arrested in 2015 on accusations that he tried to steal a propaganda banner during a visit to North Korea and was later convicted of subversion. His family said they were told that he had been in a coma since shortly after he was sentenced to prison with hard labor in March 2016.

When Warmbier returned to Ohio last week after U.S. officials secured his release, doctors determined that he had suffered a “severe neurological injury” of unknown cause. He died on Monday.

Fox News’ Andrew O’Reilly contributed to this report.



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OHIO HACK ATTACK Pro-ISIS message appears on Gov. Kasich's website


Ohio Gov. John Kasich’s official website was one of several government pages to be hacked Sunday with messages advocating support for the ISIS terror group.

“You will be held accountable Trump, you and all your people for every drop of blood flowing from Muslim countries,” read the message on the Republican’s homepage, which also carried a black background and the message, “I love Islamic state.”

‘JIHADI COOL’: HOW ISIS SWITCHED ITS RECRUITMENT AND SOCIAL MEDIA MASTER PLAN

The page also played the Islamic Call to Prayer and displayed writings in Arabic, before it was shut down. Cleveland.com managed to capture screenshots of the site before it went offline.

TRUMP QUESTIONS WHY OBAMA ALLEGEDLY DID ‘NOTHING’ ABOUT RUSSIA HACKING, IN FOX INTERVIEW

Several other Ohio government websites were hacked, including those of the state’s first lady Karen Kasich, as well as the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Corrections, the Department of Medicaid, and Casino Control Commission.

Josh Mandel, Ohio’s state treasurer and a Republican candidate for U.S. Senate, posted on Facebook that the messages were a sign of “Radical Islam infiltrating the heartland/”

According to the New York Post, the same message also infiltrated government websites in Brookhaven, New York, on Long Island.

The hacked websites included a line attributing responsibility to a group named Team System Dz. A group of the same name has been known to hack websites worldwide for the past several years – from motorcycle retailers to daycare centers to computer repair businesses – with an array of anti-Israel and pro-Islamic messages.

In the past, the group also claimed responsibility for similar hacks in the past in Richland County, Wisconsin and in places such as Aberdeen, Scotland.

Tom Hoyt, chief communications officer for Ohio’s Department of Administrative Services, was among Ohio officials who confirmed the hack.

“All affected servers have been taken offline and we are investigating how these hackers were able to deface these websites,” he told the Associated Press. “We also are working with law enforcement to better understand what happened.”

He said the hacking in Ohio happened at about 11 a.m. EDT. He hoped the websites would be up and running sometime Monday.

The hack is part of ongoing cyberterrorism that has impacted governments and corporations across the globe.

Some see these types of hacks as simply a nuisance, though in some instances, they have been disruptive to work and government life.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.



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Pennsylvania man told to stop playing 'Taps' outside his home every night


A Pennsylvania borough council voted to restrict a man who plays “Taps” outside his home every night to Sundays and holidays only.

Joshua Corney, of Glen Rock, plays “Taps” every night at 8 p.m. to honor the people who have served the U.S. Five of the six council members voted to restrict Corney.

Corney, who is the sixth council member, did not attend the meeting. He told Fox 43 on Sunday that he knew he would not be in the meeting because he was having surgery and the issue was not on the agenda.

“(I take) 57 seconds out of each day to show our community and our country that we stand behind the men and women of this country and what they do on a day-to-day basis, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, that’s what this is for.” Corney told the station.

Corney started a petition urging Glen Rock residents to sign to allow him to keep playing every night.

Glen Rock borough council president David Young told Fox 43 in a statement that Corney is not prohibited from playing “Taps” and the solution would not violate a nuisance ordinance.



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A Brief History of ‘Fake News’



The original concept of fake news was called “disinformation,” an invention of Joseph Stalin, who coined the term.



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Eric Shawn Reports: Terror victim's son pleads with Trump — Get the fugitives back from Cuba!



Eric Shawn Reports: Terror victim's son pleads with Trump — Get the fugitives back from Cuba!



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Rift in the Gulf: Saudi Arabia and Qatar


Just friends, lovers, and partners no more is the situation in the Middle East after an extraordinary series of demands made on June 22, 2017 by Saudi Arabia and the Gulf Cooperation Council against Qatar.  In this world of ordinary people, some of whom are afflicted with an attention deficit disorder, international affairs in general do not often attain the attentive audience they deserve.  Perforce, the U.S. administration is obliged to play attention to and reach decisions regarding those demands and the unexpected blockade, land, sea, and air, by Saudi Arabia and members of the GCC against Qatar, a situation with contradictory elements in play, and one that may be a consequence of President Donald Trump’s visit to Riyadh, Saudi Arabia in May 2017.

Life does change rapidly in the Arab Middle East. A month ago, the leader of Qatar since 2013, the 37-year-old Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani, educated in Britain, including Sandhurst, the British Royal Military Academy, was one of the Arab leaders being greeted by Trump in Riyadh, and watching the president’s version of the sword dance.  Now Thani is subject to a list of demands by the boycotting countries with which Qatar must comply before the blockade and its political isolation, with economic, diplomatic, and travel restrictions, is ended.

Why these demands?  The most important are that Qatar shut down Al Jazeera TV, regarded as the most widely watched propaganda tool for Islamists; end its diplomatic mission and reduce trade with Iran; declare major groups – Muslim Brotherhood, ISIS, al-Qaeda, Hezb’allah – as terrorist groups; stop funding all terrorist groups; end Turkish military presence and its military base in the country and its training of Qatar soldiers; and expel members of Iran’s Revolutionary Guards.

Strong differences have appeared in recent years.  June 5, 2017 is not the first time problems have arisen.  In 2014, Saudi Arabia temporarily withdrew its ambassador from Qatar, largely because of a dispute over Egypt.  Reports that Qatar had paid a ransom of $1 billion to a terrorist group in Iraq to release members of its royal family who were kidnapped troubled other Arab countries.  Differences go back to the Arab Spring in 2010, when Qatar supported some changes but the Saudis favored the status quo.

The two sides disagreed over politics in Egypt, where Qatar supported the Muslim Brotherhood and the Saudis supported President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, and about Iran, with which Qatar shares a large natural gas field.  Interestingly, Qatar is the only Gulf country that supports Hamas and agrees with Turkey, which does not consider the Muslim Brotherhood a terrorist org.  But the main issue is Qatar’s alleged support of terrorist groups and individuals.

Qatar has contradictory elements.  It has close ties with Shiite Iran, and also with fundamentalist Sunni extremists.  It is the home of Muslim Brotherhood spiritual leader Yusuf al-Qaradawi.  It harbors the Al Jazeera TV channel.  It houses leaders of the Taliban and Hamas yet also U.S. generals.  Its leader, Thani, has praised Iran as an Islamic power.

Qatar is a small country, independent since 1971, consisting of 11,000 square kilometers (4,400 square miles, or about the size of Connecticut) with a population of 2.7 million people, of whom only 250,000 are citizens.  They have the world’s highest per capita income, $129,000 a year.  Oil and gas account for 80% of exports and contribute 90% of government revenue.

The country has emerged as an international player in more than one sense, not only as a member of OPEC and GCC and as the world’s leading exporter of liquefied natural gas, but also as the improbable host of the World Cup competition in 2022, though the prospect of playing in 100-degree weather is not enticing.  Coincidentally, the state-owned Qatar Airways rents space in the Trump Tower in New York City.  Among other things, Qatar is presently bidding to buy 10% of American Airlines.

The U.S. is in a dilemma being friendly with both sides.  The U.S. administration is divided, as some officials want to help mediate the dispute, while others, perhaps President Trump, regard the dispute as a Gulf family matter from which the U.S. should abstain.

However, the U.S. is an ally if not a family member.  Qatar hosts a highly sophisticated U.S. military base, al-Udeid, the headquarters of Central Command (CENTCOM), the key U.S. asset in the area, in which more than 11,000 U.S. and coalition service members are deployed.  The U.S. has sold more than $10 billion in weapons to Qatar, including Apache helicopters and patriot missiles.  The U.S. is selling Boeing F-15 fighter jets to Qatar at a cost of $12 billion.

Should the U.S. choose sides?  The rapport with Saudi Arabia has become increasingly important in the war against Islamist terrorism, and the extraordinary rise to power of the 31-year-old Prince Mohammed bin Salman, who had been defense minister and deputy crown prince.  In June 2017, bypassing his more experienced and more cautious 57-year-old cousin Mohammed bin Nayek, he was anointed crown prince and thus the future most powerful man in the country.  He is the man with whom the U.S. administration has to deal.

There are no national representative institutions in Saudi Arabia, and the personal element is all-important.  President Trump and Emir Thani now face the hard-line, seemingly dynamic, and assertive Salman, who is interested in changes in his country.  Even the issue of women driving is being discussed.

Salman has been active in both foreign and domestic affairs.  He was behind the Saudi-led military campaign to eliminate terrorists in Yemen and to counter ISIS in Syria.  The country spends $60 billion a year on weapons.  He is anxious to reduce Saudi dependence on oil.  In 2016, Salman launched Vision 2030, a program to diversify the Saudi economy and increase private business.  He introduced austerity measures, cut salaries of public employees, and reduced energy subsidies, so far without complete success.  A major part of his plan is to sell 5% of the state oil company Aramco, probably the world’s most valuable company, to assist in diversifying the economy and creating 1.2 million jobs.

Salman has four main tasks, all of which should interest the U.S.: cementing foreign relations by overcoming Islamist terrorism and limiting the power of Iran; overhauling the economy and allowing more private enterprise; controlling the extremist Wahhabism and limiting its influence so that it is reduced to a question of personal piety and reducing the power of the religious police; and allowing more freedom and human rights, especially regarding women, and encouraging public entertainment and opening cinemas.

Salman is said to have good relations with Russia, as well as with the U.S., because of the common interest in the price of oil and control of terrorism.  He is also said to believe in a stronger relationship and possibly partnership with Israel.  Indeed, it is an enticing notion that he, together with Trump, may be the key to bring Palestinians to the negotiating table.  There is already talk of increasing diplomatic and economic relations between the Saudis and the moderate Arab Sunni countries and the State of Israel.

The Saudi context is not altogether happy.  The country is confronted with a number of issues: falling oil prices (oil constitutes 80% of government revenue) now that oil, $100 barrel in 2014, is $40 in 2017; the increase in the youth population (45% of the population of 32 million is under 25); high unemployment (28% for youth); low growth of GDP, about half compared with Iran’s 4.5% growth; and the challenge of Iran’s imperialism.

President Trump and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson should join in the effort to persuade Qatar to end its support of terrorism in all its forms and encourage Qatar to be more than just a friend to fellow nations in the Middle East.

Just friends, lovers, and partners no more is the situation in the Middle East after an extraordinary series of demands made on June 22, 2017 by Saudi Arabia and the Gulf Cooperation Council against Qatar.  In this world of ordinary people, some of whom are afflicted with an attention deficit disorder, international affairs in general do not often attain the attentive audience they deserve.  Perforce, the U.S. administration is obliged to play attention to and reach decisions regarding those demands and the unexpected blockade, land, sea, and air, by Saudi Arabia and members of the GCC against Qatar, a situation with contradictory elements in play, and one that may be a consequence of President Donald Trump’s visit to Riyadh, Saudi Arabia in May 2017.

Life does change rapidly in the Arab Middle East. A month ago, the leader of Qatar since 2013, the 37-year-old Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani, educated in Britain, including Sandhurst, the British Royal Military Academy, was one of the Arab leaders being greeted by Trump in Riyadh, and watching the president’s version of the sword dance.  Now Thani is subject to a list of demands by the boycotting countries with which Qatar must comply before the blockade and its political isolation, with economic, diplomatic, and travel restrictions, is ended.

Why these demands?  The most important are that Qatar shut down Al Jazeera TV, regarded as the most widely watched propaganda tool for Islamists; end its diplomatic mission and reduce trade with Iran; declare major groups – Muslim Brotherhood, ISIS, al-Qaeda, Hezb’allah – as terrorist groups; stop funding all terrorist groups; end Turkish military presence and its military base in the country and its training of Qatar soldiers; and expel members of Iran’s Revolutionary Guards.

Strong differences have appeared in recent years.  June 5, 2017 is not the first time problems have arisen.  In 2014, Saudi Arabia temporarily withdrew its ambassador from Qatar, largely because of a dispute over Egypt.  Reports that Qatar had paid a ransom of $1 billion to a terrorist group in Iraq to release members of its royal family who were kidnapped troubled other Arab countries.  Differences go back to the Arab Spring in 2010, when Qatar supported some changes but the Saudis favored the status quo.

The two sides disagreed over politics in Egypt, where Qatar supported the Muslim Brotherhood and the Saudis supported President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, and about Iran, with which Qatar shares a large natural gas field.  Interestingly, Qatar is the only Gulf country that supports Hamas and agrees with Turkey, which does not consider the Muslim Brotherhood a terrorist org.  But the main issue is Qatar’s alleged support of terrorist groups and individuals.

Qatar has contradictory elements.  It has close ties with Shiite Iran, and also with fundamentalist Sunni extremists.  It is the home of Muslim Brotherhood spiritual leader Yusuf al-Qaradawi.  It harbors the Al Jazeera TV channel.  It houses leaders of the Taliban and Hamas yet also U.S. generals.  Its leader, Thani, has praised Iran as an Islamic power.

Qatar is a small country, independent since 1971, consisting of 11,000 square kilometers (4,400 square miles, or about the size of Connecticut) with a population of 2.7 million people, of whom only 250,000 are citizens.  They have the world’s highest per capita income, $129,000 a year.  Oil and gas account for 80% of exports and contribute 90% of government revenue.

The country has emerged as an international player in more than one sense, not only as a member of OPEC and GCC and as the world’s leading exporter of liquefied natural gas, but also as the improbable host of the World Cup competition in 2022, though the prospect of playing in 100-degree weather is not enticing.  Coincidentally, the state-owned Qatar Airways rents space in the Trump Tower in New York City.  Among other things, Qatar is presently bidding to buy 10% of American Airlines.

The U.S. is in a dilemma being friendly with both sides.  The U.S. administration is divided, as some officials want to help mediate the dispute, while others, perhaps President Trump, regard the dispute as a Gulf family matter from which the U.S. should abstain.

However, the U.S. is an ally if not a family member.  Qatar hosts a highly sophisticated U.S. military base, al-Udeid, the headquarters of Central Command (CENTCOM), the key U.S. asset in the area, in which more than 11,000 U.S. and coalition service members are deployed.  The U.S. has sold more than $10 billion in weapons to Qatar, including Apache helicopters and patriot missiles.  The U.S. is selling Boeing F-15 fighter jets to Qatar at a cost of $12 billion.

Should the U.S. choose sides?  The rapport with Saudi Arabia has become increasingly important in the war against Islamist terrorism, and the extraordinary rise to power of the 31-year-old Prince Mohammed bin Salman, who had been defense minister and deputy crown prince.  In June 2017, bypassing his more experienced and more cautious 57-year-old cousin Mohammed bin Nayek, he was anointed crown prince and thus the future most powerful man in the country.  He is the man with whom the U.S. administration has to deal.

There are no national representative institutions in Saudi Arabia, and the personal element is all-important.  President Trump and Emir Thani now face the hard-line, seemingly dynamic, and assertive Salman, who is interested in changes in his country.  Even the issue of women driving is being discussed.

Salman has been active in both foreign and domestic affairs.  He was behind the Saudi-led military campaign to eliminate terrorists in Yemen and to counter ISIS in Syria.  The country spends $60 billion a year on weapons.  He is anxious to reduce Saudi dependence on oil.  In 2016, Salman launched Vision 2030, a program to diversify the Saudi economy and increase private business.  He introduced austerity measures, cut salaries of public employees, and reduced energy subsidies, so far without complete success.  A major part of his plan is to sell 5% of the state oil company Aramco, probably the world’s most valuable company, to assist in diversifying the economy and creating 1.2 million jobs.

Salman has four main tasks, all of which should interest the U.S.: cementing foreign relations by overcoming Islamist terrorism and limiting the power of Iran; overhauling the economy and allowing more private enterprise; controlling the extremist Wahhabism and limiting its influence so that it is reduced to a question of personal piety and reducing the power of the religious police; and allowing more freedom and human rights, especially regarding women, and encouraging public entertainment and opening cinemas.

Salman is said to have good relations with Russia, as well as with the U.S., because of the common interest in the price of oil and control of terrorism.  He is also said to believe in a stronger relationship and possibly partnership with Israel.  Indeed, it is an enticing notion that he, together with Trump, may be the key to bring Palestinians to the negotiating table.  There is already talk of increasing diplomatic and economic relations between the Saudis and the moderate Arab Sunni countries and the State of Israel.

The Saudi context is not altogether happy.  The country is confronted with a number of issues: falling oil prices (oil constitutes 80% of government revenue) now that oil, $100 barrel in 2014, is $40 in 2017; the increase in the youth population (45% of the population of 32 million is under 25); high unemployment (28% for youth); low growth of GDP, about half compared with Iran’s 4.5% growth; and the challenge of Iran’s imperialism.

President Trump and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson should join in the effort to persuade Qatar to end its support of terrorism in all its forms and encourage Qatar to be more than just a friend to fellow nations in the Middle East.



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