Day: May 12, 2017

1494542068305.jpg

Airline says no to service dog


Micaela Bensko and her service dog, Blue Belle, have a bone to pick with Virgin America.

Bensko, who is wheelchair-bound and suffers from arachnoiditis and complex regional pain syndrome as a result of an accident in 2011, is alleging that Blue Belle was denied entry into Virgin Atlantic’s lounge on May 10 at John F. Kennedy International Airport– despite having the necessary credentials for a service animal and paying extra to use the facilities. 

According to Bensko, Virgin Atlantic staff were worried about the “possible discomfort of others,” and requested a doctor’s note before allowing Blue Belle to enter.

Bensko told Fox News that she and her dog were turned away after she already obtained clearance to use the Virgin Atlantic lounge from an attendant at the check-in desk.

BLIND WOMAN CLAIMS SHE AND HER SERVICE DOG WERE KICKED OFF AMERICAN AIRLINES FLIGHT

“I had gone to the Virgin desk to check in, I told them my condition, that I had to get into the lounge,” said Bensko, adding that she needed the use of the lounge because she can’t sit upright for extended periods of time without suffering spinal contractions and acute pain. “I paid $75 to use that lounge … they even printed me a special ticket [to get in].”

However, when Bensko finally arrived at the lounge, a Virgin employee said her special ticket wasn’t enough to gain entry. She began filming incident and recently posted the video to YouTube.

“It’s not policy,” an employee can be heard telling Bensko.

Bensko responds by saying she was well aware of the laws and regulations regarding service animals, and that she needed no such note to bring Blue Belle into the lounge.  

“It is a federal law that [Blue Belle] does not need a letter,” said Bensko, who was flying from JFK to LAX on Virgin America, but paid the extra to use Virgin Atlantic’s lounge. “She performs a service for me. I cannot get around without her because my neck is compromised.”

“In some places, you’re not even allowed to ask which services she performs for me,” added Bensko.

Virgin Atlantic’s regulations stipulate that passengers present an identification card for any service animal, a harness, or give a credible verbal statement. Emotional support animals, on the other hand, require further documentation.

Regardless, the Virgin employee continued to deny Bensko and her dog entry into the lounge. Bensko then asked if she could to lay on the ground near the entrance of the lounge, as her back was bothering her but was told to wait for a supervisor.

After pleading with the Virgin employee, Bensko eventually wheeled herself to a different area in order to lay down.

“I’m devastated,” Bensko says through tears. “I know a lot of people are doing videos now about airline, but this just hits home for so many people, because we go through so much stuff already.”

Bensko also told Fox News that she’s not planning to file a lawsuit against Virgin — she merely wants the airline industry to better train their employees on how to deal with passengers with disabilities.

“My main issue with this, and what I constantly encounter with service … there’s just no training as to the laws, the federal laws, mandated by our government between service animals and emotional support animals,” she said.

“I pressed record because nobody sees these things, with disabled people,” added Bensko of her motivation to film the incident. “People can see us, but they don’t look because they don’t wanna see.”

Virgin Atlantic says they are currently investigating the incident. In a statement obtained by Fox News, the airline apoligzed for the experience Bensko endured, and stated that “all customers [with] support dogs are welcome in our Clubhouses.”

“As soon as we were made aware of this incident, we sent an urgent reminder to our Clubhouse teams to clarify the policy around support dogs, and will be investigating further to improve the way the situation was handled,” wrote Virgin. “It is never our intention to disappoint our customers and we’re keen to speak directly with the customer to understand what improvements we can make to ensure this doesn’t happen again, and to offer our heartfelt apologies.”

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK FOR MORE FOX LIFESTYLE NEWS

But while Bensko has yet to hear from Virgin Atlantic directly, she tells Fox News that her grievance “goes so far beyond anything that can be managed by a phone call.”

She has penned an open letter to the airline industry, because, when it comes to this issue, she says she’s “physically unable” to keep quiet.

“[I] hope it can somehow spark a change in how airlines and corporations train (or in this case, don’t train) their employees as to the federal laws mandated specifically to protect the disabled.

“I hope my experience opens this conversation much needed between the airlines and the ADA community.”



Source link

694940094001_5431694629001_5431651491001-vs.jpg

Miss Kentucky had to choose


Miss Kentucky Madelynne Myers was double booked for two momentous events in her life this weekend. 

She will be skipping her graduation from Vanderbilt University to compete in the 2017 Miss USA pageant in Las Vegas. She tells Fox how she made the decision saying, “I sat down with my mom and I realized, you know, graduation represents a closing of doors. Miss USA is a chance for me to open up a huge opportunity, if not a career, a lifestyle.” 

The 22-year-old concentrated in molecular and cellular biology with the hopes of being a pediatric trauma surgeon. She said she went through some back-and-forth to convince her professors to let her squeeze in this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

THE 6 MISS USA CONTESTANTS YOU NEED TO KNOW

She told her professors, “I kind of took on a new job, it’s gonna involve me flying everywhere every weekend, do you mind not making exams on Mondays?”

A Lexington native, Myers started competing in pageants in high school and won Miss Kentucky in January. She recalled always being in the library at her all-girls school.

She believes the medical field suffers from gender inequality, and she would like to bridge that gap. Myers admires stars like Emma Watson who are fighting to end gender inequality. 

Women representing every state and the District of Columbia are participating in the Miss USA pageant on Sunday.

Last year’s winner Deshauna Barber, who represented the District of Columbia, was the first military member to win the crown, serving in the Army.

The competition will air live on FOX on Sunday. 

Andrew Craft is a Fox News multimedia reporter based in Las Vegas, Nevada . Follow him on twitter: @AndrewCraft



Source link

1494605367451.jpg

Woman's unusual transformation


In popular culture, achieving a trim and toned body is often equated with happiness, but one young woman is slashing that notion.

On May 4, Hannah Foster, of Northern California, shared a pair of side-by-side photos on Instagram: one in which she’s wearing a polka-dot string bikini and another in which she’s wearing a one-piece cutout swimsuit.

“The girl on the left hated herself vastly more than the girl on the right, even though she weighed 30 pounds less than right-girl,” Foster wrote in the post, which had received about 340 likes as of Friday morning. “She was in a nasty relationship, living abroad and lonely, and despite losing weight STILL HATED HER BODY.

“Losing weight,” she writes in the post, “won’t make you love yourself.”

BLOGGER POSTS UNUSUAL TRANSFORMATION PHOTO

She told Yahoo! Beauty that she only came to that realization after several years of struggling to accept herself.

“I told myself, subconsciously and consciously, that if I could just lose a little bit more, restrict calories a little bit more, find a little more time to work out — that I could be happy,” she told the website.

In the first picture, she told Yahoo, she is in Spain, where beaches are topless, and people flaunt all different kinds of bodies.

“It really felt like a safe space for a bikini,” she told Yahoo. “This was the first time I swam in the ocean — I’m from California, but the northern part, where the water is 50 degrees and rocky. I wanted to memorialize this moment.”

In the second photo, she’s in Hawaii, her “body-image revolution trip,” after receiving a number of mental health diagnoses and prescription medications.

WOMAN’S HEARTBREAKING POST ON DEPRESSION GOES VIRAL ON FACEBOOK

“The turning point for me was talking with someone about disliking my body and she said, ‘If you talked to another person the way you talked to yourself, you would seem like the most horrible, nasty person,’” she told Yahoo. “’You’re not a horrible, nasty person, so why do you treat yourself that way?’ This just blew my mind.”

Ultimately, Foster’s body transformation coincided with her mental health transformation. Today, she understands that, regardless of what society wants to make us think, being slim doesn’t always result in a happy life.

“I think there’s this ideal content point that women fantasize about — I know I did — that if you can just get there then you will be happy and perfect and your whole life will be better,” she said. “This point does not exist.”

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK FOR MORE FOX LIFESTYLE NEWS



Source link

GLOBAL HACK: Major cyberattack targets 74 countries in Europe, Asia


Cyber attacks that hit 74 countries across Europe and Asia Friday, impacting the public health system in Britain, apparently involved a leaked hacking tool from the National Security Agency.

The attack used ransomware, which is malware that encrypts data and locks a user from their data until they pay a ransom. The tool, which was leaked by a group known as Shadow Brokers, had been stolen from the N.S.A. as part of a wide swath of tools illegally released in 2016.

TRUMP CAN WIN THE CYBER WAR (BY FOLLOWING CHURCHILL’S APPROACH)

Microsoft said that they had rolled out a patch to fix the issue, but certain targets, including the hospitals in Britain, had not yet updated their systems.

The malware was sent via email with a file attached to it. From there, it subsequently spread.

Tom Donnelly, a spokesman for N.H.S. Digital, said the attack was still “ongoing” and that that the organization was “made aware of it this afternoon,” according to an interview in The New York Times.

The impact of the attacks caused phone lines to go down, appointments to be canceled and patients to be turned away, but there has been no reported evidence of patient data being breached.

“It’s one of the widest sperad attacks we’ve ever seen,” said Michael Balboni, President of Redland Strategies, a consulting firm that specializes in cybersecurity. Balboni, who is also a former homeland security advisor for the state of New York, said that the possiblity of another attack this size is possible.

“We’re entering an age known as cyber-insecurity,” Balboni added. “There’s going to be a huge response from the public now that doctors and hospitals are being affected, there is going to be a huge shift in how people think about this.”

There were a number of pictures posted to social media highlighting the ransomware, which asked for $300 in Bitcoin.

NHS Digital, which oversees cybersecurity in Britain, said the attack did not specifically target the NHS and “is affecting organizations from across a range of sectors.” In total, 16 NHS organizations said they were affected.

British Prime Minister Theresa May addressed the hacks, saying it’s not just targeted at the NHS.

“This is not targeted at the NHS, it’s an international attack and a number of countries and organisations have been affected,” May said in a statement. “The National Cyber Security Centre is working closely with NHS digital to ensure that they support the organisations concerned and that they protect patient safety.”

May added that though she was not aware of any leaked data, vigilance must be taken.

“Of course, it is important that we have set up the National Cyber Security Centre and they are able to work with the NHS organisations concerned and to ensure that they are supported and patient safety is protected,” May said.

In addition, several Spanish companies had also been affected via a ransomware attack. Spain did not say which companies were affected, but Telefonica, a telecom giant said it had detected an incident which affected some of its employees.

UK HOSPITALS TURN AWAY PATIENTS AFTER RANSOMWARE ATTACK

 

Hospital operator NHS Merseyside tweeted “following a suspected national cyberattack, we are taking all precautionary measures possible to protect our local NHS systems and services.”

Bart’s Health, which also operates a number of London-based hospitals, activated its major incident plan, which included canceling routine appointments and diverting ambulances to different hospitals.

 



Source link

1494598832237.jpg

Activist who identified daughter's attackers was killed on Mexican Mother's Day


The governor of the Mexican state of Tamaulipas said he will not allow the death of human rights activist Miriam Rodriguez to become just another statistic in the 10-year deadly drug war.

Rodriguez was killed Wednesday night while at her home in the town of San Fernando, where she was widely known for her efforts helping locate some of the 5,500 people currently missing in the state.

San Fernando is about 90 miles south of Brownsville, Texas, and is a critical point on drug- and migrant-smuggling routes to the border.

EX-GOVERNOR OF TAMAULIPA’S LONG FLIGHT FROM JUSTICE ENDS

Rodriguez was living in the U.S. when her daughter went missing in 2012. She returned to look for her and did not stop until she found her remains two years later in an unmarked grave. By then she had become a widely known human rights activist and eventually founded the group Citizen Community in Search of the Disappeared.

According to people who knew her, Rodriguez had received numerous death threats and feared for her life because she had identified her daughter’s attackers — alleged members of the Zetas cartel.

“They are going to kill me one day. Of that not I have doubts,” she told an acquaintance interviewed by El Universal.

Tamaulipas Attorney General Irving Barrios said the state had been protecting Rodriguez, sending police patrols three times a day to her house. Barrios also said nine people had been put on trial for her daughter’s kidnapping and murder.

TEXAS MOTHER AND DAUGHTERS AMONG THOSE KILLED IN MEXICAN FAMILY MASSACRE

A number of organizations, including the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights in Mexico, called on the authorities to ensure that this murder does not go unpunished.

“Beyond her murder, it is imperative to address the structural factors that have placed the families of missing persons in a serious situation of vulnerability,” said in a statement the office in Mexico of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights.

Rodríguez, 50, was killed on the day Mexico celebrates Mother’s Day, which the UN noted gives the murder “a chilling symbolism.”

The AP contributed to this report.



Source link

1494621515565.jpg

CONSERVATIVE CHOPPED Fans wonder if Tim Allen’s show axed over politics


Tim Allen’s hit sitcom “Last Man Standing” has seen its final days.

ABC announced it has canceled Allen’s show after six seasons.

“This was a scheduling decision,” wrote Jori Arancio, senior vice president of ABC Entertainment and ABC Studios, in an email sent to Fox News on Friday.

According to Deadline, ABC and its production partner for the show 20th Century Fox TV typically negotiate licensing fees prior to each season, however the network simply decided to pull the plug.

A rep for 20th Century Fox TV told us cancellation decisions are made by ABC. 

‘BIG BANG THEORY’ HAD NO PLAN?

The cancellation came as a shock for many fans considering the show’s high ratings. Deadline reports the sitcom was the network’s second-highest comedy this season and averaged 8.1 million viewers, just behind “Modern Family,” which averaged 8.7 million viewers this season and was recently renewed for two more seasons. It was also ABC’s third highest watched scripted series behind “Grey’s Anatomy” and “Modern Family.”

So why was the show killed?

Some fans speculated it was due to the show’s conservative slant.

Allen, a conservative himself who has voiced his support for President Donald Trump, plays Mike Baxter who is also politically conservative on the show. “Last Man Standing” has been praised for being one of the few shows that appeal to a conservative viewership, something the network was conciously trying to do.

ABC Entertainment President Channing Dungey said in December during a London media summit that broadcast TV was not paying enough attention to the Donald Trump voters.

FORMER NBC CHIEF BOB WRIGHT ON MEDIA’S BIAS AGAINST TRUMP: ‘IT’S EVERYWHERE’

“With our dramas, we have a lot of shows that feature very well-to-do, well-educated people, who are driving very nice cars and living in extremely nice places,” Dungey said. “… But in recent history we haven’t paid enough attention to some of the true realities of what life is like for everyday Americans in our dramas.”

Allen has not yet responded to the cancellation. He spoke to Jimmy Kimmel in March about being his right-leaning politics being an issue in Hollywood.

“You gotta be real careful around here,” Allen noted. “You get beat up if you don’t believe what everybody else believes. This is like ’30s Germany.”

You can find Sasha Savitsky on Twitter @SashaFB.



Source link

1494604788010.jpg

BELLWETHER Does Donald Trump want to be president?


President Trump’s eccentric behavior, especially in the past week, raises a serious question: Does he want to be president?

His Twitter threat against James Comey, whom he fired as director of the FBI, suggests he might have secretly recorded their conversations. Banning American news media from his Oval Office conversation with Russia’s foreign minister while allowing a TASS photographer to record the event may be payback against a press corps he despises. But it also fuels suspicions that he is indebted, somehow, to the Kremlin. Recently, he retweeted Rosie O’Donnell, surely a first for a sitting president.

His undisciplined tweets give the public contradictory information, and a sense that he wants to run the country via social media instead of democratic debate.

The question is: to what end?

Most of Trump’s executive orders – there have been 36 so far – are in keeping with his campaign promises, and they have been well-received by his political base – those voters who felt they were being ignored by traditional politicians and wanted, as Trump put it, to “drain the swamp” of Washington.

Tighter immigration restrictions are popular with Americans who believe we have lost control of our borders. The process of repealing ObamaCare faces an uphill battle in the Senate, but that cannot be blamed on the president.

The military action against Syria after it attacked its own citizens with deadly nerve gas was honorable and justified. It also sent a message to rogue nations like North Korea to tread carefully.

The new trade deal with China that increases American exports and will lower our trade deficit is long overdue. The tax code needs reform and this administration is preparing just such an overhaul.

Why then does the president muddy the political waters by ranting against Democrats who oppose him, against news organizations that ask tough questions, against foreign leaders who pursue policies different from his? Why does he obsessively remind Americans that it was he, and not Hillary Clinton, who was elected president? Why must he spar with television personalities who dislike him?

Bellwether wonders whether Trump actually plans to stay in office for four years. Could he be considering a shorter stay in the White House, passing the baton to the widely respected Vice President Mike Pence? Might Trump feel that if and when he achieves his major goals – tighter borders, lower taxes, more American-made goods – he can declare victory and return to his successful career in the private sector?

The president, in his first four months in office, has accomplished much of which to be proud. Like Ronald Reagan, his optimism about America’s future is contagious. The stock market, which many predicted would tank if he were elected, has rebounded convincingly. Consumer confidence is up. Several major employers have announced that they will create thousands of jobs in America.

But his random tweets, his crude public use of insults and threats and his blatant disregard for decorum and the integrity of the office of president raise questions about his willingness to fulfill those duties for the long run.

Trump is slowly accomplishing his mission. If he plans to walk away from Washington once he feels he has fulfilled his promise to the American people, he should say so. Both his supporters and his growing list of opponents would probably respect his candor, and they might work together to give him what he wants, so he will go away. 

John Moody is Executive Vice President, Executive Editor for Fox News. A former Rome bureau chief for Time magazine, he is the author of four books including “Pope John Paul II : Biography.



Source link

694940094001_5428019150001_5428014237001-vs.jpg

NEXT IN LINE? Newest Trump spox sparks speculation of bigger role


Sarah Huckabee Sanders picked one heck of a week to fill in for Press Secretary Sean Spicer at the White House podium — but it could be part of a trial by fire. 

Speculation is mounting that the deputy press secretary is being eyed for a bigger role, amid a tumultuous week where she became the face of the administration’s response to President Trump’s decision to fire FBI boss James Comey. 

Sanders took plenty of hits from the press, especially when the president seemed Thursday to contradict the original White House narrative that he was merely acting on the recommendation of a top Justice official. 

But she rarely wavered, and the president apparently is watching closely. 

“We’re all under the impression that [Sanders] is auditioning for a greater role in the Trump administration and don’t rule out Spicer’s job,” a White House aide told Fox News, backing up a report in Politico that Trump is eyeing Sanders as a possible replacement for Spicer. 

Spicer, up until Friday, has been absent from the briefing room for the past week while on Naval Reserve duty. Sanders was thrown into the proverbial fire when Trump abruptly fired Comey, a decision that left staff scrambling. Despite Spicer’s absence, a Washington Post report said Trump faulted Spicer and his team for a shaky response to a decision for which they apparently had little notice. 

But since the communications team has launched a full-throated defense of the firing, the daughter of former Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee and veteran campaign operative is said to have impressed Trump.

“The president likes her,” a senior White House official told Fox News on Wednesday.

The situation for Spicer was not improved by the release of a trailer for the upcoming “Saturday Night Live,” with Melissa McCarthy reprising her brutal impression of the White House spokesman. 

For his part, Spicer has brushed off the speculation over his own job security.  

And other White House sources have pushed back on the idea of Sanders being in an audition of sorts. One called it “totally ridiculous.” Another stressed that Spicer was merely out because of “pre-planned” Reserve duty, “nothing surprising.” 

Spicer was indeed back at the podium on Friday. 

Sanders, in her role as deputy press secretary, also is no stranger to the press corps and has engaged daily with media since the start of the administration. But her official on-camera briefing debut came last Friday when the passage of the health care bill in the House and executive actions related to religious freedom were the primary stories.

Sanders then displayed a lighter touch in pushing back at the media firestorm over Comey. 

“Not to sound like a broken record, but since you guys keep asking the same questions, I guess it’s only fair that I keep giving the same answers,” she said in response to a question about Trump’s changing opinions about Comey.

“Sanders is better at briefing than Spicer,” noted Wall Street Journal columnist John Harwood. 

“She was the consummate professional. She answered questions directly and came to the briefing extraordinarily well-prepared,” said Bob Wickers, a Republican media strategist who first met Sanders when she interned for him.

“She and Spicer have different approaches and I think you could argue that both are effective — Spicer gets the numbers, there is no denying that,” said Sarah Lenti, a Republican political consultant. “Whether you like President Trump and his policies or not, I think both Spicer and Sanders are succeeding in their roles.”

Even critics complimented her approach, albeit back-handedly.

“Sarah Sanders parries, spins and obfuscates, too. But she’s not condescending and seems comfortable at the podium doing it,” tweeted Josh Dawsey of Politico. 

“One Trump supporter emails that the ‘temperature’ in the briefing room has come down dramatically,” Maggie Haberman of The New York Times tweeted on Wednesday.  

Yet, as the Comey story developed and the president gave interviews that appeared to contradict statements from the press office, Sanders found herself in the same firing line as Spicer.

“Overall she has done as well as can be expected of anybody in that position, but a spokesman is only as good as their relationship with their boss and the information they are given,” said Alex Conant, a partner at Firehouse Strategies and former communications director to Florida Sen. Marco Rubio.

“I certainly don’t envy whoever is in that role,” Conant said, who contends that Trump is not serving his staff well by providing staff with inaccurate information.

Even on the conservative wing, the credibility of the White House was in doubt.

“This kind of despicable lying is just an example of the collapse of all standards, and Sarah Huckabee Sanders should hang her head in shame,” asserted New York Post columnist John Podhoretz on Twitter. 

In a Friday morning series of tweets, President Trump all but conceded the White House had been inaccurate in its statements.

 “As a very active President with lots of things happening, it is not possible for my surrogates to stand at podium with perfect accuracy!….” he said, suggesting briefings should just be canceled. 

Fox News’ Serafin Gomez and Kaitlyn Schallhorn contributed to this report.



Source link

THE SHORTLIST WH sources confirm 11 possible FBI replacements


The Trump administration is considering nearly a dozen candidates — a list that includes top current and former lawmakers as well as law enforcement figures — to replace fired FBI Director James Comey, a White House official briefed on the matter told Fox News on Friday. 

The timeline for a nomination is unclear, but the official said they are moving quickly.

“We are moving quickly and expeditiously to pick an interim and a permanent replacement, and we’re doing our due diligence—we’re not going to cut any corners,” the source told Fox News. 

The roster of contenders is extensive, including some names already reported such as former Rep. Mike Rogers and former New York City Police Commissioner Ray Kelly as well as lesser-known law enforcement officials. 

Kelly has long been known to Trump from his days serving as NYPD commissioner. Kelly spent nearly five decades in the NYPD serving in different commands. After his handling of the World Trade Center bombing in 1993, Kelly was mentioned as a possible candidate for FBI Director. Kelly also was Director of Police under the United Nations mission in Haiti, also serving in the Clinton administration as Treasury Department Undersecretary for Enforcement.  Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., endorsed Kelly as a candidate for secretary of Homeland Security during President Obama’s first term, and later to head the FBI in 2011 when Robert Mueller stepped down from the post.

Shortlist for FBI director

  • Ray Kelly, the former and longest-serving New York City police commissioner 
  • Mike Rogers, former House Intelligence Committee chairman and former FBI agent 
  • Former Assistant Attorney General Alice Fisher
  • Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C.
  • Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn, R-Texas
  • Paul Abbate, executive assistant director for the Criminal, Cyber, Response and Services Branch
  • Associate Judge of New York Court of Appeals Mike Garcia
  • Mayor of Colorado Springs John Suthers
  • Former federal appellate court Judge Michael Luttig, now executive vice president of Boeing 
  • Larry Thompson, former deputy attorney general under President George W. Bush 
  • Acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe

The list also includes several lawmakers on key law enforcement oversight panels. Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., led the congressional probe into Benghazi; Rogers is an ex-Michigan congressman who led the House Intelligence Committee and served as an FBI agent; and Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn, of Texas, sits on the Senate Intelligence Committee.

Others being considered to fill Comey’s job are seasoned DOJ professionals. Thompson was deputy attorney general for President George W. Bush, and Fisher was deputy assistant attorney general for the Criminal Division, and was only the second woman ever to hold the position. John Suthers, now mayor of Colorado Springs, was a federal prosecutor, as was Mike Garcia. Garcia was appointed by Bush as a U.S. attorney and now serves as an associate judge on the New York Court of Appeals.

Those on the list with FBI-specific experience include Rogers and Paul Abbate, now assistant director in charge of the FBI. Current Acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe served as Comey’s No. 2, and is now being considered for permanent director.

Luttig, the executive vice president of Boeing, would cover Trump’s penchant for plucking from the private sector to fill key administration roles. Luttig is also a former federal appellate court judge. 

McCabe swiftly stepped into the role of acting director after Trump’s controversial decision to fire Comey on Tuesday. 

He seemed to undermine parts of the administration’s narrative about the Comey firing during Senate testimony on Thursday. He argued that Comey had not generally lost the confidence of rank-and-file within the bureau despite suggestions to the contrary from the White House, and described the Russia meddling investigation as significant. 

But the White House source told Fox News he is still “very much being considered for permanent and interim [director] — that has not changed.”

The official added: “Some of the things he said backed up some very important points. Of course this is a significant investigation, but it has turned up zero evidence of collusion—the place is leaking like a sieve, and if there was something out there, we’d have heard by now.”

Any full-time replacement for Comey would require Senate confirmation, and the president could be in for stiff resistance from Democratic lawmakers and some Republicans who have voiced concerns about the Comey firing. 

The White House official told Fox News that the candidate list is fluid, and names could be added or removed as the process moves forward.

Brooke Singman is a Reporter for Fox News. Follow her on Twitter at @brookefoxnews.



Source link

694940094001_5432024746001_5432022735001-vs.jpg

GLOBAL HACK: Major cyberattack targets 12 countries in Europe, Asia


Cyber attacks that hit 12 countries across Europe and Asia Friday, impacting the public health system in Britain, apparently involved a leaked hacking tool from the National Security Agency.

 

The attack used ransomware, which is malware that encrypts data and locks a user from their data until they pay a ransom. The tool, which was leaked by a group known as Shadow Brokers, had been stolen from the N.S.A. as part of a wide swath of tools illegally released in 2016.

TRUMP CAN WIN THE CYBER WAR (BY FOLLOWING CHURCHILL’S APPROACH)

Microsoft said that they had rolled out a patch to fix the issue, but certain targets, including the hospitals in Britain, had not yet updated their systems.

The malware was sent via email with a file attached to it. From there, it subsequently spread.

Tom Donnelly, a spokesman for N.H.S. Digital, said the attack was still “ongoing” and that that the organization was “made aware of it this afternoon,” according to an interview in The New York Times.

The impact of the attacks caused phone lines to go down, appointments to be canceled and patients to be turned away, but there has been no reported evidence of patient data being breached.

There were a number of pictures posted to social media highlighting the ransomware, which asked for $300 in Bitcoin.

NHS Digital, which oversees cybersecurity in Britain, said the attack did not specifically target the NHS and “is affecting organizations from across a range of sectors.” In total, 16 NHS organizations said they were affected.

In addition, several Spanish companies had also been affected via a ransomware attack. Spain did not say which companies were affected, but Telefonica, a telecom giant said it had detected an incident which affected some of its employees.

UK HOSPITALS TURN AWAY PATIENTS AFTER RANSOMWARE ATTACK

 

Hospital operator NHS Merseyside tweeted “following a suspected national cyberattack, we are taking all precautionary measures possible to protect our local NHS systems and services.”

Bart’s Health, which also operates a number of London-based hospitals, activated its major incident plan, which included canceling routine appointments and diverting ambulances to different hospitals.

 



Source link