Day: February 11, 2017

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Schumer, Sanders call for rallies against Obamacare repeal


Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., are calling for rallies nationwide in late February to push against Republican efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act.

In a letter to their colleagues in the Senate, the pair call for their fellow Senate Democrats to lead and participate in rallies on Feb. 25. They also argued that the Republican plan to repeal Obamacare is mired in “chaos” and that the majority of Americans do not want the healthcare law repealed.

“The Republican Party’s plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act is in chaos,” Schumer and Sanders said in the letter. “The American people increasingly understand that throwing 20 million people off health insurance, privatizing Medicare, raising prescription drug costs for seniors and doing away with life-and-death patient protection provisions is not acceptable. The overwhelming majority of Americans want to improve the ACA, not destroy it,”

“We are encouraging Democratic senators to lead rallies in their states. This is not a Democratic issue, a Republican issue or an Independent issue. The overwhelming majority of Americans, regardless of political persuasion, understand that we have to go forward on health care, not backwards,” the letter said.

The rallies would piggyback off similar rallies held by Democratic senators on the issue on Jan. 15.

Throughout the first three weeks of President Trump’s tenure in the White House, Democrats have been outspoken about their support for the ACA and critical of Republicans for not being ready with a plan to replace the law upon its possible repeal.

Federal agencies weigh how to satisfy Trump's demand for 'extreme vetting'

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The executive order gives departments 90 days to review screening measures.

02/11/17 12:33 AM



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Democrat calls Trump 'the most significant test of our time' in weekly address


House Democratic Caucus Chair Joe Crowley on Saturday deemed the past three weeks since President Trump was sworn into office “perhaps, the most significant test of our lifetime.”

Speaking on behalf of congressional Democrats in the party’s weekly address, the New York representative claimed the Republican commander in chief has launched attacks on the Constitution and America’s democracy.

“There’s been a lot of talk lately about what is America, and what is American,” Crowley said.

“What’s American is people welcoming refugees and families at arrival gates. It’s lawyers upholding the Constitution from an airport floor and a laptop. It’s young people discovering the need for civic engagement. And children learning that no matter who you are, or where you came from, or what you believe, you are welcome here.”

Trump had issued an executive action on Jan. 27 that temporarily suspended immigration from seven countries in the Middle East and North Africa. A number of state attorneys general sued the administration, alleging the action discriminates against Muslims, who make up the majority of those countries’ populations.

The Washington state suit escalated to an appeals court, which ruled in favor of a Seattle judge on Tuesday to continue a restraining order on the lower judge’s ruling.

“In attacking our Constitution, the fundamental tenets of our democracy and who we are as a people, President Trump has dismissed everything we stand for. Everything our ancestors fought for,” Crowley said.

Trump said the order was put into effect until stronger vetting protocols for those countries can be put into place to ensure terrorists do not embed as refugees or asylum-seekers to enter the U.S.

Crowley charged that the country has rallied behind Democrats’ principles and will continue to “resist,” though he did not state what a victory for the party would look like.

Trump vows to bring price of wall 'WAY DOWN!' following high-cost estimate

Also from the Washington Examiner

The president says he’ll succeed just like how he brought down the price of the F-35 and Air Force One.

02/11/17 8:58 AM

“My fellow Americans, this is not a political fight – this is a fight for our future. This is about our democracy. This is about our country. This is about our people – and making our voices heard,” Crowley finished.

“And let me tell you: it’s working. And I know this is a fight we will win.”

Federal agencies weigh how to satisfy Trump's demand for 'extreme vetting'

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The executive order gives departments 90 days to review screening measures.

02/11/17 12:33 AM



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Apple CEO Tim Cook: 'Fake news' is 'killing people's minds'


Apple CEO Tim Cook has a dire warning about the effects of “fake news.”

“We are going through this period of time right here where unfortunately some of the people that are winning are the people that spend their time trying to get the most clicks, not tell the most truth,” the technology leader told the Daily Telegraph. He added that these faux reports are “killing people’s minds in a way.”

The proliferation of fake news is a burgeoning issue, most notably during the 2016 election, thanks in large part to sharing on social media. The phenomenon has led to politicians on both sides of the aisle to complain that these misleading stories have been damaging. Both Hillary Clinton and former President Barack Obama blamed fake news, in part, for Clinton’s loss in the presidential election to President Trump.

Cook pinned the responsibility of curbing fake news on technology companies.

“We must try to squeeze this without stepping on freedom of speech and of the press, but we must also help the reader. Too many of us are just in the complain category right now and haven’t figured out what to do,” Cook said.

He added that a crackdown will help “truthful, reliable, non-sensational, deep” news outlets “win” in their struggle to convey real news against the tide of fake news click bait.

“The [rise of fake news] is a short-term thing — I don’t believe that people want that at the end of the day,” Cook said.

Some social media outlets, like Facebook, have already taken steps to stem the tide of fake stories, but it is yet to be seen how effective these efforts will be.

Trump tweets: 'Our legal system is broken!'

Also from the Washington Examiner

The president’s ban is getting another look in court as soon as next week.

02/11/17 7:31 AM

Federal agencies weigh how to satisfy Trump's demand for 'extreme vetting'

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The executive order gives departments 90 days to review screening measures.

02/11/17 12:33 AM



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Trump tweets: 'Our legal system is broken!'


"Our legal system is broken!" tweeted President Trump. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Trump panned the U.S. legal system as being “broken” after a three-judge panel on the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals unanimously ruled this week to keep a restraining order on his travel ban in place while the courts consider the merits of Washington state’s case against the ban.

“Our legal system is broken! “77% of refugees allowed into U.S. since travel reprieve hail from seven suspect countries.” (WT) SO DANGEROUS!”, Trump tweeted early Saturday morning, citing a report from the Washington Times.

However, Trump’s ban is getting another look as soon as next week after it was revealed late Friday that the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals will vote on whether the full federal appeals court should vote on lifting the block on Trump’s executive order that bars citizens from seven Muslim-majority countries in the Middle East and North Africa with high terror risk.

Right after the federal appeals court made its initial decision on Thursday, Trump vowed, “SEE YOU IN COURT,” on Twitter.

The president also suggested on Friday he might consider a “brand new order” on immigration and refugees as a way around the courts’ block of his travel ban.

Federal agencies weigh how to satisfy Trump's demand for 'extreme vetting'

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The executive order gives departments 90 days to review screening measures.

02/11/17 12:33 AM

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What life is like under a tweeting president


President Trump’s relationship with the political press corps is unconventional, to say the least. He tweets at will, leaving reporters to wonder if he’s breaking new ground or sending a political smoke signal to his loyal voting base. He also doesn’t hesitate to publicly badger reporters — by name — who have fallen out of favor, while praising those he likes for friendly coverage.

To try to get a better sense of Trump’s take on the media, and how the president’s unusual approach impacts his staff that has to deal with the fallout, the Washington Examiner spoke to Boris Epshteyn, special assistant to the president and assistant White House communications director.

Washington Examiner: Talk about the president’s unconventional and confrontational approach to the media.

Epshteyn: The president has been unbelievably transparent. He’s had a great media presence throughout the campaign, the transition and now as president, doing interviews with ABC, with Sean Hannity, with CBN. So of course he has a good relationship with media, as well as speaking to some print reporters.

Now, as far as the criticism: The president is an American citizen, and he has the right to criticize the media when he thinks that they’re being unfair. And, as the president, from his position, his goal and concentration is on reaching the American people. It’s not about pleasing the media. It’s cutting, in a lot of ways, cutting through the veneer and any of the distractions that sometimes are put forth by the media and going right straight to the American people. Twitter goes a long way toward that.

And, sometimes when he does feel that criticism is deserved, criticizing those in the media for unfair coverage [is warranted]. Again, look at the story on the Martin Luther King, Jr., bust. That was a typical story from a left-wing media, which was meant to connote somehow or suggest that the president of the United States is somehow biased, or even racist, and it was completely made up. So, the coverage from the media sometimes is skewed, and the president of the Unites States has the right to call it out.

Washington Examiner: Is there a danger that when the president criticizes reporters by name, he puts a target on their back that could endanger their security?

Epshteyn: The president of the United States never intends to put any members of the media in a negative spotlight, or, absolutely, not in harm’s way. It’s a give and take, and it’s a discussion, and members of the media are, of course, are public figures. They go on TV and in print — their names are out there, so, the president of the United States is not putting anything out there that’s not in public view.

Washington Examiner: The president likes to tweet without advance notice. How does that affect your job?

Federal Election Commission calls on Trump to share evidence of voter fraud

Also from the Washington Examiner

The president on Friday asserted that illegal votes were cast against him in New Hampshire.

02/11/17 1:22 AM

Epshteyn: I love my job; I love working here. I love working for a man who’s authentic and who’s all in on helping the American people and making America stronger. And him being as authentic as he is and able to connect to, and with, the American people as much as he does, it makes me love my job even more. So, I’ve got no qualms about that whatsoever.

Washington Examiner: But does it make your job difficult?

Epshteyn: I wouldn’t say “difficult,” no — no. What I would say is it’s a part of the job and Twitter has been something that’s been sort of a new development, of course, over the past several years. But it’s a very effective tool and a tool that has been used obviously, strongly by the president during the campaign and continues to be used now, as president, to deliver key messages.

Washington Examiner: President Trump has only been in office for two weeks. From the outside it has at times appeared chaotic, at other times as though you’re humming right along. What does it feel like to be in the cauldron?

Epshteyn: It’s such an honor. It’s an honor, an opportunity and it’s really the greatest thing I’ve ever done, I think, in my life, professionally. In terms of operations, it’s been unbelievably productive. You see everything that we’ve accomplished so far.

Exclusive: Internal poll says Dems can sway voters against Gorsuch

Also from the Washington Examiner

The summary of the poll said there is “limited initial support for Gorsuch.”

02/11/17 12:54 AM

The president’s delivering everything that he said he would and of course, the very, very strong nomination of Judge [Neil] Gorsuch to the Supreme Court, so it has been resolute and productive. So, whatever media coverage is out there, what’s negative is just media left-wing spin.

Washington Examiner: What does the president want to have accomplished after his first 100 days? What is most important to him?

Epshteyn: It’s the gamut of topics that we talked about throughout the campaign and the transition, right? What’s great about this first time period we’re through now is we’ve been delivering on promises. So, it’s national security and the economy are the top two topics that the president is concentrated on.

Washington Examiner: The rollout of the executive order impacting refugees was chaotic. By contrast, the rollout of the nomination of Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court went smoothly. Talk about the president’s management style.

Epshteyn: The concentration is not how things are playing on the morning shows; the concentration is on the content. The content is what’s important to the American people and both of these actions — the pause on refugee and immigrant entry to this country, 90-120 days, really a pause and a reassessment — and of course, the nomination of Judge Gorsuch to be the ninth associate justice, are both actions which are key for making America stronger and moving it farther into being a leader in the world and for Americans to be employed and safe and secure.

So, again, the concentration is on what the action entails, and what both those actions entail is betterment for the American people.

Washington Examiner: Address criticism from Republicans in Congress who want to be supportive of the president but feel as though the White House doesn’t always loop them in.

Epshteyn: We’ve been in great communication with the Senate and the House. We’ve been having briefing calls, we’ve been having meetings. Just yesterday, I had the pleasure of being up on the Hill for the meetings that Judge Gorsuch was having. So there’s a lot of coordination. [Former] Sen. Kelly Ayotte shepherding the nomination is something that’s a very, very strong development and something that shows that President Donald Trump is president for all Americans.

Sen. Ayotte was not always in agreement with the president during the campaign, but now, she’s out there saying that this is our president and she’s excited and honored to be working on behalf of the nomination and making sure that Judge Gorsuch is confirmed. So there’s a lot of coordination with the Senate, as there has been with the executive orders. So, we are working well, hand in hand together.

Federal agencies weigh how to satisfy Trump's demand for 'extreme vetting'

Top Story

The executive order gives departments 90 days to review screening measures.

02/11/17 12:33 AM



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Sheriffs dismiss a major Democratic talking point on sanctuary cities


Sheriffs from around the country are dismissing Democratic claims that sanctuary cities help give illegal immigrants the confidence to report local crimes to police, without fear of being deported.

Democrats have put forward that argument for the last several months in the face of Republican efforts to block cities from creating safe zones for illegal immigrants. But sheriffs reached by the Washington Examiner say they’re not aware that this kind of cooperation really exists between law enforcement and illegal immigrants, or that cops in sanctuary cities get more assistance from illegal immigrants.

Many of the sheriffs who are skeptical don’t work in sanctuary cities. But National Sheriffs’ Association executive director Jonathan Thompson, who represents a wide geographical range of law enforcement officers, said he has never seen any statistics indicating that illegal immigrants are a significant source of information for police.

“I’ve not even seen anecdotal evidence,” Thompson told the Washington Examiner. “The sad thing is that [the Democratic claim] suggests that people here are aware of criminal activity and are not reporting it. We have to give them specific dispensation so that they’re reporting crimes? … I find the irony thicker than anything I can cut with a knife, that somebody here illegally is going to report a crime.”

Others who don’t work in sanctuary cities have similar doubts that guaranteed protection for illegal immigrants would help those immigrants reach out to police with information about crimes.

Sheriff Chuck Jenkins of Frederick County, Md., who was called last April to testify in a House of Representatives hearing on the effectiveness of immigration policies, said he’s heard the Democratic argument many times over the years. Jenkins, in his 12th year as mayor in Maryland’s largest county, said he doesn’t buy it because his experiences on the job point to a different reality.

“I believe the illegal alien community is smart enough to know that there are protections in place that if they are victims, not to put them into removal custody,” Jenkins said. “They can request a U-visa — basically gives them asylum from any deportation or removal.”

Jenkins added that most jurisdictions do not actively try to identify the immigration status of someone who comes forward, “so the whole argument doesn’t really make sense.”

Sam Page has been sheriff in Rockingham County, N.C., for nearly two decades and has not seen illegal immigrants with tips for solving local crimes come forward to help. He also said it makes no sense for politicians to choose which laws to enforce, and which can be ignored.

Exclusive: Internal poll says Dems can sway voters against Gorsuch

Also from the Washington Examiner

The summary of the poll said there is “limited initial support for Gorsuch.”

02/11/17 12:54 AM

“Some people in government at those levels want to be able to pick and choose what laws they enforce,” said Page. “If there are laws on the books, then we enforce the laws. And the legislature and Congress, they enact legislation. If they don’t like the laws, then they need to change the laws, but you don’t pick and choose which laws you enforce.”

About 500 miles northeast, in a Pennsylvania county that borders upstate New York, Bradford County Sheriff Clinton Walters said he has not observed anything that validates lawmakers’ and pundits’ claims, and doesn’t see why someone here illegally would come forward.

“They’re here illegally and they’re doing whatever, whether it’s the drug business or work or whatever brought them here. I don’t think they’re trying to be Good Samaritans and report crimes,” Walters said.

Page said a majority of illegal immigrants come from countries where police cannot always be trusted, which stays with them when they move to the U.S.

“Some people won’t report, but I think a lot of that’s driven by the culture where they come from, they don’t trust them [police],” Page said. He added that U.S. has nearly a million law enforcement officers “that do it right every day,” assisting all communities in the same manner.

What life is like under a tweeting president

Also from the Washington Examiner

Comms director Boris Epshteyn: “I wouldn’t say ‘difficult,’ no, no. What I would say is it’s a part of the job.”

02/11/17 12:39 AM

Jenkins said another reason some may not come forward to report crimes is because they are intimidated by the violent criminals and “thugs” in their communities. The Maryland sheriff said in his experience as a former criminal investigator who worked a number of high-profile cases in the 1990s, he regularly saw the potential for payback as a factor in why people did not work with police after a crime was committed.

Due to the lack of statistical information of who reports crimes, the Democratic messaging continues.

“It’s a whisper campaign. You tell a lie once it goes around the world in 20 seconds,” Thompson said. “I think it makes a nice soundbite. It’s nice for some in law enforcement who want to believe that all criminal aliens want to support local law enforcement. That may be true, but I don’t know of any statistics … that suggest that this is a wealth or reserve ocean of confidential informants.”

Federal agencies weigh how to satisfy Trump's demand for 'extreme vetting'

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The executive order gives departments 90 days to review screening measures.

02/11/17 12:33 AM



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Exclusive: Internal poll says Dems can sway voters against Gorsuch


Progressive activists who oppose Judge Neil Gorsuch’s Supreme Court nomination are armed with internal polling that they believe shows swing-state voters in battleground states can be convinced that Gorsuch should not be confirmed.

The Washington Examiner obtained a detailed Hart Research Associates survey and two-page summary distributed by the Alliance for Justice, a liberal group pushing Senate Democrats to oppose Gorsuch. The research was sent to “interested parties.”

The summary of the poll, which was conducted Feb. 1-3 in 10 states represented by a Democratic senator that President Trump won, said there is “limited initial support for Gorsuch.” That creates an opportunity for Democrats to convince voters in these states that he would not represent average working men and women’s views in the Supreme Court.

The summary from Hart pollsters Geoff Garin and Guy Molyneux argued that Gorsuch is receiving support from far less than a majority of battleground voters in those 10 states.

“Just 42 percent say the Senate should confirm Neil Gorsuch, while 58 percent either oppose confirmation or are not yet ready to decide,” they wrote. “Significantly, once voters learn a bit more about Neil Gorsuch’s record and philosophy, opposition to his confirmation doubles, while support is virtually unchanged.”

After hearing arguments both for and against the nominee, battleground voters divide even on the confirmation, 44-44 percent, the poll found. People who are initially undecided later reject Gorsuch by an “overwhelming” 59-14.

“While many Democrats and independents are withholding judgment in these early days, the survey findings suggest that the coming debate will move most of them to opposition,” they concluded.

Liberal activists are circulating the research to ease some of the pressure on red-state and swing-state Senate Democrats up for re-election in 2018, who may be worried that a vote against the well-qualified nominee could alienate independent voters.

With Republicans controlling 52 Senate seats, they need eight Democrats to vote with them to advance Gorsuch’s nomination to a final vote.

Federal Election Commission calls on Trump to share evidence of voter fraud

Also from the Washington Examiner

The president on Friday asserted that illegal votes were cast against him in New Hampshire.

02/11/17 1:22 AM

The National Republican Senatorial Committee, the campaign arm of Senate Republicans, is already targeting 14 Senate Democrats in 13 states with ads aimed at highlighting the importance of their vote on the Supreme Court nominee.

The ads will focus on ratcheting up the pressure on Democratic Sens. Bill Nelson of Florida, Sherrod Brown of Ohio, Bob Casey of Pennsylvania, Tim Kaine of Virginia, Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin, Joe Donnelly of Indiana, Claire McCaskill of Missouri, Jon Tester of Montana, Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota, Joe Manchin of West Virginia, Maggie Hassan and Jeanne Shaheen of New Hampshire, Debbie Stabenow of Michigan and Michael Bennet of Colorado.

The vulnerable Democrats can take some solace that voters in their states appear to want the Senate to take some time to fully vet Gorsuch’s qualifications and judicial philosophy, instead of rushing the nomination through.

“By a commanding 43 points, [battleground voters] say the Senate should ‘take the time needed to carefully review the nominee’s qualifications and judicial philosophy before confirming a lifetime appointment,” the memo stated.

The poll also pushed back on the widely held GOP belief that Gorsuch’s qualifications are so impeccable that vulnerable Democrats in swing or red states who vote against him could pay a political price for it.

Sheriffs dismiss a major Democratic talking point on sanctuary cities

Also from the Washington Examiner

“I find the irony thicker than anything I can cut with a knife, that somebody here illegally is going to report a crime.”

02/11/17 12:44 AM

“If a senator concludes that Trump’s nominees cannot be counted on to protect [working individuals’] rights, a large majority of voters say it is then acceptable for the senator to oppose confirmation – even if the nominee is professionally qualified to serve on the Supreme Court,” the poll found.

“Six in 10 (60%) say a senator may vote no if he believes the nominee would consistently vote to weaken legal protections for civil rights, the environment, workers’ rights, consumer safety, and women’s rights, despite having the professional qualifications to serve,” the poll found.

Read the poll here:

Federal agencies weigh how to satisfy Trump's demand for 'extreme vetting'

Top Story

The executive order gives departments 90 days to review screening measures.

02/11/17 12:33 AM



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Federal Election Commission calls on Trump to share evidence of voter fraud


A member of the Federal Election Commission is calling on President Trump to share any evidence he may possess of voter fraud during the 2016 election after it was reported that Trump blamed illegal votes for costing him and a Republican senator a victory in New Hampshire.

“According to widespread news reports circulating today, President Trump has alleged an astonishing voter-fraud scheme that he claims denied him and former Sen. Kelly Ayotte victory in the state of New Hampshire in the 2016 elections. The scheme the President of the United States alleges would constitute thousands of felony criminal offenses under New Hampshire law,” read a statement Friday from FEC Commissioner Ellen Weintraub.

“As a Commissioner on the Federal Election Commission, I am acutely aware that our democracy rests on the faith of the American people in the integrity of their elections,” Weintraub continued. “The President has issued an extraordinarily serious and specific charge. Allegations of this magnitude cannot be ignored. I therefore call upon President Trump to immediately share his evidence with the public and with the appropriate law-enforcement authorities so that his allegations may be investigated promptly and thoroughly.”

Trump held a closed-door meeting with 10 senators Thursday about Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Judge Neil Gorsuch. Former Sen. Kelly Ayotte was present at the meeting too, now serving as Trump’s liaison to Congress on Gorsuch.

A participant said that the president brought up the election, according to Politico, claiming he and former Ayotte, who lost her re-election bid, would have beaten their opponents in New Hampshire were it not for “thousands” of illegal voters people who were “brought in on buses” from Massachusetts.

The White House did not immediately return a request for comment on the report.

Trump lost New Hampshire’s four electoral votes to Hillary Clinton by just under 3,000 votes. Ayotte was defeated by Democratic Gov. Maggie Hassan by a scant 743 votes.

Trump has repeatedly stated he believes millions of illegal immigrants voted in the election, costing him the popular vote. Voters gave Clinton a 2.8 million-vote advantage, but Trump won the election with 306 electoral votes, while Clinton received 227 votes.

Despite Trump’s repeated assertions of mass voter fraud, there isn’t much in the way of evidence to back those claims, even after recount efforts by the Green Party’s Jill Stein in Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania. After the president called for a “major investigation” into illegals vote last month, House Speaker Paul Ryan said there is “no evidence” of voter fraud.

Exclusive: Internal poll says Dems can sway voters against Gorsuch

Also from the Washington Examiner

The summary of the poll said there is “limited initial support for Gorsuch.”

02/11/17 12:54 AM

Still, Trump said during an interview broadcast last weekend that he would put Vice President Mike Pence in charge of a commission to examine possible voter fraud during November’s election “very, very carefully.”

Federal agencies weigh how to satisfy Trump's demand for 'extreme vetting'

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The executive order gives departments 90 days to review screening measures.

02/11/17 12:33 AM



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Report: White House talking to candidate for one of Spicer's press jobs


Carl Higbie, a former Navy SEAL and one of the first supporters of President Trump during his campaign, on Friday said he has spoken with a few White House officials about taking over one of Sean Spicer’s jobs as press secretary or communications director.

“Well, I can say that I’ve offered my services,” Higbie told the Washingtonian. “I haven’t heard back from the administration yet. I’m honored to be even considered for this.”

Later Friday evening, Higbie tweeted, “FOR THE RECORD: in last few weeks I spoke to some in admin regarding communications or spox positions, NO formal interviews.”

Earlier this week, news broke that the White House was looking to give Spicer some extra help in the communications office. Spicer has been working double-time since Jan. 20, serving as both White House press secretary and communications director.

Higbie previously worked as spokesman for the Great America PAC.

No one in the Trump administration has ever stated publicly that Spicer is underperforming in his job, but comments he has made from the podium have received more pushback from the media than other administrations’ press secretaries.

Spicer is a former colleague from the Republican National Committee to now-White House chief of staff Reince Priebus. Priebus “vouched for Spicer and against Trump’s instincts,” one source told CNN.

According to that report, Trump “regrets it every day and blames Priebus” for the place Spicer has put the Trump administration in as a result of his briefings, so it may make sense that the White House is considering a replacement.

Immigration officers go after criminal aliens in six states, deny sweeps or checkpoints

Also from the Washington Examiner

Claims that people have been targeted at checkpoints and community sweeps are “false, dangerous and irresponsible.”

02/10/17 9:31 PM

The full 9th Circuit may review Trump immigration ban ruling

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Judge has asked for a vote on whether the entire federal appeals court should rule on the restraining order.

02/10/17 6:37 PM



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Immigration officers go after criminal aliens in six states, deny sweeps or checkpoints


Federal immigration officers launched a blitz of raids across six states on Thursday and Friday, seizing an unknown number of illegal aliens, according to multiple reports.

Department of Homeland Security spokesperson Gillian Christensen confirmed agents have raided homes and workplaces in and around Atlanta, Los Angeles and other cities, according to the Washington Post.

A spokesperson for the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency said claims, as the Post also reported Friday, that people have been targeted at checkpoints and community sweeps are “false, dangerous and irresponsible.”

“These reports create mass panic and put communities and law enforcement personnel in unnecessary danger. Any groups falsely reporting such activities are doing a disservice to those they claim to support,” ICE said in a statement to the Washington Examiner.

“ICE regularly conducts targeted enforcement operations during which additional resources and personnel are dedicated to apprehending deportable foreign nationals. All enforcement activities are conducted with the same level of professionalism and respect that ICE officers exhibit every day. The focus of these surges no different than the routine, targeted arrests carried out by ICE’s Fugitive Operations Teams on a daily basis.”

Activist groups who work for those in the U.S. illegally said they have heard about activity in Vista, Pomona and Compton, Calif.; Austin, Dallas and Pflugerville, Texas; Alexandria and Annandale, Va.; Charlotte and Burlington, N.C.; Plant City, Fla.; the Hudson Valley region of New York; and Wichita, Kan.

ICE said the majority of those detained were adult men.

The move comes two weeks after President Trump signed an executive order on Jan. 26 for federal agents to enforce the Immigration and Nationality Act and go after illegal aliens who had previously not been deemed the focus of the Obama administration’s Priority Enforcement Program.

Last January, Obama’s DHS launched a number of raids targeting hundreds of illegal immigrants who had entered the U.S. since 2014 and evaded deportation orders.

Report: White House talking to candidate for one of Spicer's press jobs

Also from the Washington Examiner

Spicer has been working double-time since Jan. 20, serving as both press secretary and communications director.

02/10/17 9:11 PM

“As I have said repeatedly, our borders are not open to illegal migration; if you come here illegally, we will send you back consistent with our laws and values,” former DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson had said at the time of the sting operations.

Trump has promised to deport all criminal aliens.

The full 9th Circuit may review Trump immigration ban ruling

Top Story

Judge has asked for a vote on whether the entire federal appeals court should rule on the restraining order.

02/10/17 6:37 PM



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