Day: February 7, 2017

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I think you mean Crimea, congresswoman.


I missed this yesterday when it happened, so I’m sharing it with you now in case you did, too.

Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., either had a big slip of the tongue during a press conference, or she is under the very false impression that Russia has invaded Korea.

The congresswoman spoke Monday with a gaggle of reporters in the nation’s capital about her opposition to President Trump.

“How can a president, who is acting in the manner that he’s acting … whether he’s talking about his relationship to [Russian President Vladimir Putin], and the Kremlin – and knowing that they have hacked our D-triple-C – DNC, and knowing that he is responsible for supplying the bombs that killed innocent children and families in, um,” she stammered, forgetting the name of the conflict zone to which she was referring.

Someone standing near her reminded her that Putin has been involved in the shelling of civilians in the Syrian city of Aleppo.

“Yeah, in Aleppo,” Waters said.

She continued, adding, “And the fact that he is wrapping his arms around Putin while Putin is continuing to advance into – Korea?”

I think she meant Crimea, which Russia annexed on March 18, 2014. Either that or she actually thinks Russia has advanced into one of the Koreas, in which case I have no idea what she’s talking about.

“I think that he is leading himself into that kind of position where folks will begin to ask, what are we going to do?” Waters said. “And the answer is going to be, eventually, we’ve got to do something about him. We cannot continue to have a president who’s acting in this manner. It’s dangerous to the United States of America.”

Sean Spicer could lose his second role of communications director

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02/07/17 6:31 PM

The congresswoman’s remarks come after she said last week that she hoped Trump wouldn’t last a full term.

“And my greatest [hope] is to lead him right into impeachment,” she said.

The challenge to Trump's order? It has a lot to do with money

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02/07/17 4:13 PM



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Ivanka Trump shares photo of her and baby son in White House


Ivanka Trump shared a photo of herself and her smiling 10-month-old son Theodore in the White House on Tuesday.

“Making a call in the White House with my personal assistant Theodore,” the caption reads.


It’s the second post in recent weeks that Trump has shared of her youngest son in the White House.

In late January, Trump shared a video of Theodore crawling in the White House for the very first time.

“There were so many incredible milestones this past weekend — including one for baby Theodore who crawled for the very first time in the White House!” she wrote.


Pro-Trump outside groups ready to shell out cash for 2018

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GOP effort to be buttressed by 45Committee and the affiliated Future45.

02/07/17 6:07 PM

The challenge to Trump's order? It has a lot to do with money

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Washington State has motives of its own in pursuing the case.

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Iran apologists have a misleading narrative on Trump's policies


The Trump administration’s decision to put Iran “on notice” for its provocative ballistic missile test and to subsequently slap new sanctions on individuals and entities affiliated with its missile program was a positive break from the previous administration’s policy of ignoring Iran’s belligerent behavior while showering it with concessions.

The measure was welcomed by the critics of the failed appeasement policy toward Iran in Capitol Hill and across the world.

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker, R-Tenn., called the announcement “a new day in U.S.-Iran relations,” stressing that it’s past time to undertake a “coordinated, multi-faceted effort to push back against a range of illicit Iranian behavior.”

Rep. Eliot Engel, D-N.Y., ranking member of the House Foreign Relations Committee, welcomed the new round of sanctions and underlined the need for the United States and its allies to deal with Iran’s destabilizing behavior around the world.

Mohammad Mohaddessin, Chair of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the exiled opposition group National Council of Resistance of Iran, called the measure “a positive step” in confronting an illegitimate and terrorist dictatorship, and stressed the need to impose total sanctions on Iranian entities involved in suppression, terrorism and fundamentalism.

Proponents of rapprochement also reacted to Trump’s tougher stance against Iran. In order to prevent the unraveling of their interests, however, they are driving their point by drawing dangerous conclusions through a narrative based on misrepresenting the facts of Obama’s tried-and-failed playbook.

Organizations like NIAC, an Iran lobby deeply tied to Tehran, suggest that communication channels created between the Obama administration and Iran paved the way for a nuclear deal that prevented a war with the country and also facilitated the release of ten U.S. sailors captured by the Iranian Revolutionary Guard (IRGC) in early 2016, both false assumptions.

The former is a flawed deal that has only made the Iranian regime a more hostile state by legitimizing its nuclear program and giving it billions of dollars to squander on its violent agenda in Syria and elsewhere, while the latter was an opportunity that the IRGC seized upon to humiliate the U.S.

Swedish-Iranian expat Trita Parsi refers to the release of U.S. hostages as another achievement of open dialog with Iran, referring to the Obama administration’s $1.7 billion ransom, which drove the mullahs into turning hostage-taking into a lucrative business.

John McCain's mom celebrates 105th birthday

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Another example is former Obama advisor Philip Gordon’s op-ed in The New York Times, in which he claims that under the previous administration, “the United States made significant efforts to contain Iran.”

However, in the same piece, Gordon admits that the nuclear pact has failed to address Iran’s ballistic missile program. He also implicitly confesses that Iran’s Shiite proxies in Iraq, which grew in size after Obama’s hasty retreat from the country, are a potential threat for U.S. troops in the region.

This is not exactly what you would call containment.

Both writers base their argument that Trump should continue to appease Iran on the presumption that a firm stance toward Tehran will lead the U.S. to a military confrontation, or “an embarrassing retreat,” as Gordon likes to put it.

But the U.S. doesn’t need to go to war with the Iranian regime to contain it. There is already an organized Iranian resistance movement, the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (MEK/PMOI), which is quite capable of doing so and has strong bipartisan support among U.S. lawmakers and politicians.

Report: Iran pulls missile from launchpad

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ImageSat International produced an image from Feb. 3 that showed a missile had been prepped for the launch.

02/07/17 5:21 PM

Backers of diplomatic capitulation to Iran have constantly tried to discredit the MEK in order to conclude that the only solution to mend fences with Iran is to seek moderates within the regime, a proven hoax and myth and an empty goal that will only help keep the leading state sponsor of terrorism in power.

If the past is any indication, appeasing regimes that have no respect for universal democratic values is a recipe for disaster, yielding short-term jubilation at the expense of long-term insecurity.

Thanks in large part to the Obama administration’s kid-glove treatment of Iran, the Middle East is already a hotbed of chaos and extremism, a powder keg that can only be defused by a serious change in policy. That change should be to stand with the Iranian people in their plight and struggle for freedom and regime change, a crucial step toward promoting peace in the Middle East and across the globe.

Amir Basiri (@amir_bas) is a contributor to the Washington Examiner’s Beltway Confidential blog. He is an Iranian human rights activist.

If you would like to write an op-ed for the Washington Examiner, please read our guidelines on submissions here.

The challenge to Trump's order? It has a lot to do with money

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Washington State has motives of its own in pursuing the case.

02/07/17 4:13 PM



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Civil rights groups deliver 1 million anti-Sessions signatures to Senate


Despite the opposition from various groups, the Alabama Republican is expected to be confirmed Wednesday. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

The Senate on Tuesday received 1 million petition signatures calling for senators to reject Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions’ nomination to be attorney general.

“He decides whom to charge and perhaps not to charge, and which laws to enforce most vigorously, and perhaps which not. And that comes to my central complaint and my reason for opposing Senator Sessions,” said Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., when delivering the signatures.

Blumenthal sits on the Senate Judiciary Committee, which approved Sessions’ nomination last week.

The petition signatures were collected by various civil rights groups such as the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights and Voto Latino.

According to Jessica Reeves, Voto Latino’s COO, Sessions would simply “allow President Trump’s radical agenda to fly through the Justice Department” as the nations’ top law enforcement official.

Despite the opposition from various groups, the Alabama Republican is expected to be confirmed by the Senate on Wednesday.

Trump immigration ban showdown: How the lawsuit breaks down

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Federal appeals court will rule on executive order, which may then be taken up by Supreme Court.

02/07/17 1:50 PM

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Democrats show on DeVos that they're not for the little guy


The Democratic Party has been hugely successful in persuading people that it is the party of the little guy. Whereas Republicans focus rapaciously on money, it’s the Democrats who champion reform on behalf of those who suffer under the status quo.

It’s a con, and nothing could show it more clearly than the Democrats’ antics in opposing the nomination of Betsy DeVos to be education secretary. Those obstructive efforts finally failed Tuesday, when DeVos was confirmed in the Senate with Vice President Mike Pence casting the tiebreaking vote.

Opposing school choice and the educational freedoms proposed by DeVos shows that Democrats aren’t with the littlest guys in society — the boys and girls in K-12 schools.

Instead they’re with the teachers unions, which organize for Democrats and pay handsomely into Democratic coffers. (What was that about the GOP rapaciously focusing on money at the expense of the powerless?) The Democrats’ outsized effort against DeVos, with its preening and disingenuous speechifying, was an effort to stay as close to the teachers unions as possible.

After falling flat on their faces in the 2016 election, Democrats are desperate to motivate their base and take at least one scalp from among President Trump’s nominees. But they can thank their former leader, Harry Reid, D-Nev., for making this next to impossible by when he scrapped 60-vote threshold required for confirmations to the Cabinet.

Senate Democrats admitted that their 24-hour occupation of the Senate floor was an empty stunt, for, as Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn. said, “It’s unlikely we’re going to get that 51st vote but we’re going to try until the very last minute.” (Murphy, by the way, went to a good public school in an expensive suburb of Hartford).

Within minutes of losing the vote, the Democratic National Committee sent out a fundraising pitch seeking donations of $10 which, it said, would help fight vulnerable Republican senators.

Some on the Left called the Senate vote a “big win for the resistance movement.” To which the only answer is, with wins like that, who needs losses?

Democrats say Trump picked DeVos to reward a mega-donor (a fanciful claim given that DeVos attacked Trump during the GOP primary and never truly got on board with him in the general election).

Kelly: Crime database will speed deportations

Also from the Washington Examiner

Kelly said his team would work with the victims’ families while the cases are prosecuted as well.

02/07/17 4:45 PM

If Democrats were actually the party of the little guy, they wouldn’t resist a change agent who’s ready to shake up the failing educational status quo; 53 percent of the general public gives the nation’s schools as a whole a C grade, with an extra 22 percent giving a D or F grade.

Progress on the Nation’s Report Card in math and reading is stalled or declining, depending on the grade year and subject. No matter how you look at the numbers, students in African-American and Hispanic families, the core constituencies of the Democratic Party, lag far behind their white counterparts.

When looking at the schools in their communities, African-Americans are the most dissatisfied group of all, with 54 percent grading their schools as a C, D, or F compared to 45 percent of whites and 39 percent of Hispanics.

DeVos’ primary goal should be to expand educational freedom. Students and parents should feel fulfilled and satisfied with the education at their schools. What good is a “free” public education if you can’t ask for a refund from the government when you’re unhappy with the result?

It’s not up to the federal government to reach into local schools and make improvements. Only 10 cents of every government dollar spent on K-12 education comes from the federal government. It’s the responsibility of state and local school institutions to make improvements. Most importantly, it’s up to parents, so they need the flexibility to do that.

Graham: Attack against Sessions is an 'attack on conservatism'

Also from the Washington Examiner

Sen. Lindsey Graham argued Tuesday that Democratic attacks against Sen. Jeff Sessions’ nomination to be the next attorney general are really just attacks against conservatism, because Democrats don’t think any Republican is qualified to lead the Department of Justice.

“The bottom line is that most of things said about Jeff Sessions and the way he acted as a senator could be said about almost all of us on this side who consider themselves conservative,” Graham, R-S.C., said on the Senate floor.

He noted that the NAACP has a scorecard that puts all Republicans at 25 percent or lower when it comes to upholding that group’s values. Democrats, in contrast, score 100 percent or in the high 90s.

“Not only did Jeff Sessions

02/07/17 4:43 PM

Today, Democrats and teachers unions can be glad the secretary of education has little power, and that the new secretary is keen to yield her power to states, communities and families regardless of their ideology.

If Democrats are truly appalled by the power given to DeVos, perhaps they’ll sign up to cosponsor H.R. 899, introduced by Rep. Thomas Massie, R-Ky. The bill is one sentence long. “The Department of Education shall terminate on December 31, 2018.”

Trump immigration ban showdown: How the lawsuit breaks down

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02/07/17 1:50 PM



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Kelly: Crime database will speed deportations


President Trump’s team plans to use a database of crimes committed by people who entered the country illegally as a roster for facilitating deportations, according to the head of the Department of Homeland Security.

John Kelly, a retired Marine Corps general who was one of Trump’s first two cabinet nominees to receive Senate confirmation, told lawmakers that the office managing the database will report directly to him. In the early years of the administration, the staff will coordinate with the families of crime victims to keep them apprised of the perpetrator’s case.

“And you can bet that my people will be standing there when he is paroled to take him into custody and send him back to wherever he came from,” Kelly told a House Homeland Security subcommittee panel.

Trump cited individual examples of such crimes during the presidential campaign to punctuate the need for additional border security, although the federal government currently lacks data to to say how many take place annually.

“The rate of murder may be lower or higher than other groups, but when we are talking about people, violent crime is never zero,” the Center for Immigration Studies’ Steven Camarota, whose organization favors stricter immigration policies, told Politifact last year. “By the same token, it cannot be thousands every year. But adding up a few years then it has to be in the ‘thousands.’ There are a lot of murders in America and there are a lot illegal immigrants, so the statement has to be true.”

The anecdotes dominated political debates about immigration in the 2016 elect cycle, particularly after a San Francisco woman was shot by a man who had previously been deported but returned to the sanctuary city. Congressional Republicans eventually invited the parents of individuals killed by people who took refuge in sanctuary cities to testify about their experiences.

“I am not a one-story mother,” Laura Wilkerson, one of those witnesses, told House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi at a recent CNN townhall. “This happens every day because there are no laws enforcing the border.”

Kelly said his team would work with the victims’ families while the cases are prosecuted as well. “Those people could expect from us, if they call and say how’s that case going — the person who murdered my daughter with a gun, or ran over my son with an automobile, or killed a police officer on the side of the road — how is that going?” he said. “So we will be able to give a description of what it is.”

Graham: Attack against Sessions is an 'attack on conservatism'

Also from the Washington Examiner

Sen. Lindsey Graham argued Tuesday that Democratic attacks against Sen. Jeff Sessions’ nomination to be the next attorney general are really just attacks against conservatism, because Democrats don’t think any Republican is qualified to lead the Department of Justice.

“The bottom line is that most of things said about Jeff Sessions and the way he acted as a senator could be said about almost all of us on this side who consider themselves conservative,” Graham, R-S.C., said on the Senate floor.

He noted that the NAACP has a scorecard that puts all Republicans at 25 percent or lower when it comes to upholding that group’s values. Democrats, in contrast, score 100 percent or in the high 90s.

“Not only did Jeff Sessions

02/07/17 4:43 PM

Trump immigration ban showdown: How the lawsuit breaks down

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02/07/17 1:50 PM



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Obama makes 'first major endorsement' since leaving White House


Former President Barack Obama on Tuesday said he supports the re-election of Los Angeles Democratic Mayor Eric Garcetti.

In a news release, the Garcetti campaign described it as Obama’s “first major endorsement” since leaving the White House.

“As mayor of Los Angeles, Eric Garcetti has delivered by raising the minimum wage, creating jobs and expanding economic opportunity,” Obama said. “This past November, Eric led the campaign to pass the largest transportation infrastructure measure in our nation’s history. Eric is my friend, loyal ally and a great and visionary mayor of Los Angeles. I strongly endorse Eric Garcetti for a second term as mayor of Los Angeles.”

In a statement, Garcetti said: “I am honored and humbled to be endorsed by my friend and ally in making LA work for everyone, President Barack Obama. President Obama led us from the great recession, extended healthcare to millions of people and brought millions more closer to equality. Our work together helped create jobs, build infrastructure and lift people from poverty all across our city.”

The Democratic primary is set for March 7. Garcetti has 10 challengers.

Trump immigration ban showdown: How the lawsuit breaks down

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Trump's joke about civil forfeiture; or, why federalism matters


During a White House meeting with law enforcement on Tuesday, Sheriff Harold Eavenson of Rockwall County, Texas, complained to President Trump that local lawmakers are trying to reform civil forfeiture laws. In many states, those laws currently allow law enforcement to seize cash and property from their owners and keep them to boost police budgets, even if the owners aren’t convicted or even charged with a crime. Even worse, the owner usually has to prove that the property wasn’t used in a crime, a reversal of the “innocent until proven guilty” standard that prevails in criminal courts.

“There is a state senator in Texas who was talking about introducing legislation to require a conviction before we could receive that forfeiture money,” Sheriff Eavenson said to Trump. “And I told him that the cartel would build a monument to him in Mexico if he could get that legislation passed.”

“Who is the state senator?” Trump asked. “Want to give his name?”

He then offered, apparently in jest: “We’ll destroy his career.”

Yes, it was a joke, and for obvious reasons that was what everyone focused on. But forfeiture is a serious issue on which people at all points of the political spectrum are coming to recognize that due process and the rule of law are under threat. And civil forfeiture reform is an issue where Trump’s soon-to-be-confirmed Attorney General, Jeff Sessions, has been squarely at odds with conservatives for some time. States will need to resist federal pressure to keep this abusive practice going, just as they had to under President Obama, who was historically bad on this issue.

Some states — like Ohio, New Hampshire, Florida, Montana, Nebraska, Minnesota, Maryland and New Mexico — have recently passed civil forfeiture reforms. (Others, such as Michigan, have at least passed laws that require full transparency and reporting on forfeitures.) These states are already preventing the police from doing what it seems they obviously shouldn’t have been allowed to do in the first place: taking small cash and property from people who have been neither charged with nor convicted of any crime. It’s a surprisingly common practice, even though it sounds completely unconstitutional.

Where implemented properly, these reforms are also preventing or hindering local law enforcement from circumventing state law by participating in the federal Justice Department’s Equitable Sharing program.

There’s no reason to assume that President Trump is especially knowledgeable on this issue, or that he knew for sure what he was condoning. But this is an area where conservatives should be unsparing with their criticism if necessary. Civil asset forfeiture is not just some obscure issue. It’s the difference between living in a country where the cops can shake you down for whatever is in your pockets, or even take your house away for a crime you didn’t even commit, or living in a country where such injustices don’t and cannot happen.

Fortunately, as long as state senators, legislators and governors refuse to be cowed, these reforms are going to happen, with or without Trump. Federalism matters.

Obama makes 'first major endorsement' since leaving White House

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California sheriffs back Sessions' stance on immigration


Six sheriffs from some California’s biggest counties met with Sen. Jeff Sessions Tuesday on Capitol Hill to back his nomination for attorney general, just a day before his expected Senate confirmation, and as President Trump is threatening to withhold federal funding to cities that shelter illegal immigrants.

Sheriff John McMahon of San Bernardino, the site of the December 2015 terrorist attack that killed 14 people, was strongly enthusiastic about Sessions.

“He wants to bring law enforcement together with the U.S. attorney general’s office and [have] everybody meet and talk about collaborative solutions to problems that we’re all facing locally, not only just in California but across the entire nation,” McMahon told the Washington Examiner. “And a good, close relationship with the attorney general’s office makes a big difference in what we’re able to do every day.”

After their meeting, the sheriffs said they are seeking Sessions’ support once he becomes attorney general as expected on Wednesday. That includes working together on several California-specific problems that are tying their hands when it comes to keeping illegal immigrants convicted or charged with major crimes detained in order to work with federal immigration authorities.

The sheriffs said they are already severely limited in how long they can hold illegal immigrants before they are forced to release them. California lawmakers also are advancing measures that would further restrict their ability to work with Immigration and Customs Enforcement to detain illegal immigrants charged but not convicted of crimes.

“Everyone in this room has the same issue,” McMahon said.

When inmates are booked into county facilities, local authorities send their fingerprint to ICE to determine whether they are wanted for deportation based on their charges and past records. If ICE wants to come pick them up, they have a very short window — less than 48 hours — in order to do so.

“If our bus goes to the place to release them and ICE is not there, that person walks off the bus and is back in the community — we no longer have the ability to hold them for 48 hours like we used to,” McMahon said. He was referring to a court decision which said holding these people violates their 4th Amendment rights against unreasonable search and seizures.

“All we’re asking, and not just here but all over, is a process to allow a warrant, a probable cause declaration, some type of judicial review that will give us the ability to hold them for up to 48 hours so ICE has time to come pick them up,” he said.

GOP threatens weekend work to confirm Trump's Cabinet

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02/07/17 3:03 PM

Geoff Dean, the sheriff of Ventura County, said many of the immigrants in question are either convicted or face charges for serious crimes such as murder, rape and assault with deadly weapon.

“They are a small percentage in my county in Ventura, .08 percent of our total inmate population. It’s not like we’re deporting a lot of people — last year it was people charged with homicide to multiple DUIs, rapes, everything,” he said. “It seems common sense. I’m not sure anybody would want someone who has someone who has committed a murder, rape, or child molests in the country illegally to stay.”

Others who participated in the meeting were Sheriffs Steve Freitas of Sonoma County, Scott Jones of Sacramento County and David Livingston of Contra Costa County, and Undersheriff Don Barnes of Orange County.

The meeting between Sessions and the California county sheriffs came amid a war of words between Democratic leaders in the state and Trump.

During an interview with Fox News’ Bill O’Reilly Sunday, Trump said California “in many ways is out of control as you know.”

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He specifically said the state’s consideration of legislation to create statewide sanctuary for people living in the country illegally is “ridiculous” and threatened to withhold federal funds as a result.

“I don’t want to defund anybody. I want to give them the money they need to properly operate as a city or a state,” Trump said. “If they’re going to have sanctuary cities, we may have to do that. Certainly. that would be a weapon.”

Leaders of the state Legislature pushed back Monday, pointing to the state’s economy and strong job growth as important contributions to the nation, according to the Associated Press.

“If this is what Donald Trump thinks is ‘out of control,’ I’d suggest other states should be more like us,” said Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon, D-Paramount.

Trump immigration ban showdown: How the lawsuit breaks down

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Media fall for another Trump trap


After the White House released a list of 78 terrorist attacks it considered to be “underreported” on Monday, a host of journalists from David Ignatius to Anderson Cooper issued their fervent disagreement with that charge.

Certainly many in the media raised reasonable points of contention, arguing particular attacks included on the list, such as the shootings at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando and in San Bernardino, California, were covered extensively.

Outlets such as The Hill and the Huffington Post published articles focusing on typos in the list. Congressman Mark Takano, D-Calif., chided the White House for misspelling “San Bernardino” in a tweet posted Monday night.

But while the press was busy tallying spelling errors like a first-grade teacher marking up a book report, every article outlets published on the story, whether focused on typos or more substantive angles, served only to keep the attacks fresh in people’s minds.

In essence, the media’s efforts to undermine the White House’s claims fulfilled their ultimate goal of increasing coverage.

On CNN’s “New Day,” Wisconsin Republican Congressman Sean Duffy told anchor Alisyn Camerota, “You’re playing right into [President Trump’s] hand. We’re having a conversation right now about … a pause on allowing individuals to come in from seven countries that are riddled with terrorists.”

After some back and forth, Duffy remarked, “You’re now airing on your network the greatest hits over the last couple of years of terror attacks that have taken place.

When Camerota asked, “We are taking the bait?” Duffy responded, “You are. Well done.”

He added, “It does remind America what’s at stake here.”

Lockheed VP a top contender for Trump's deputy defense secretary, source says

Also from the Washington Examiner

A senior vice president at Lockheed Martin is a top contender to be President Trump’s No. 2 in the Pentagon, a source familiar with the deliberations said on Tuesday.

Robert Rangel, who was named senior vice president of strategic enterprise initiatives at Lockheed Martin in 2015 and previously served as the head of Washington operations, is a leading candidate for the deputy defense secretary job, which includes focusing on day-to-day operations of the Pentagon and internal management of the budget, the source said.

Prior to joining Lockheed Martin in 2011, Rangel served as the special assistant to Defense Secretary Robert Gates as well as a staff director for the House Armed Services Committee, according to his biography.

02/07/17 2:54 PM

Given the media’s repeated inability to resist traps laid masterfully by the White House, perhaps members of the press should reconsider their coverage depicting the Trump administration as a bumbling collection of incompetent amateurs who misspell words and can’t turn on the lights in the cabinet room.

Sure, administration officials may be having a little trouble lighting up their workspace, but they’re certainly having no trouble lighting up the press.

Emily Jashinsky is a commentary writer for the Washington Examiner.

Trump immigration ban showdown: How the lawsuit breaks down

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Federal appeals court will rule on executive order, which may then be taken up by Supreme Court.

02/07/17 1:50 PM



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