Day: February 4, 2017

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Obama-appointed ambassador: Trump's 'ill-considered ban' may have inspired threats to US


A former U.S. ambassador to Russia warned on Saturday that President Trump’s “ill-considered” executive order temporarily banning citizens from seven Muslim-majority countries may have inspired “dangerous” people to come to the U.S.

Saturday afternoon Trump tweeted out a defense of his travel ban and condemned the federal judge who issued a temporary restraining order on it.

“What is our country coming to when a judge can halt a Homeland Security travel ban and anyone, even with bad intentions, can come into U.S.?”, Trump tweeted.

“Because the ban was lifted by a judge, many very bad and dangerous people may be pouring into our country. A terrible decision,” he added.

In response to that second tweet, former Obama-appointed Ambassador to Russia Michael McFaul shot back, saying that for eight years under President Barack Obama, “such people didn’t pour into our country.”

“But maybe your ill-considered ban has inspired them now,” he continued. “Need some regular order at WH.”

McFaul later added: “I fully support Trump’s goal of preventing terrorists from entering our country, as long as the means for doing so are constitutional.”

The Trump administration has defended the 90-day travel restrictions for citizens from Iraq, Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen because these are “countries of concern” identified under the Obama administration.

Trump: 'Dangerous people' may come to US without immigration order

Also from the Washington Examiner

A federal judge in Washington state ruled Friday to halt Trump’s executive order.

02/04/17 5:47 PM

Elsewhere a former Justice Department spokesman, Matthew Miller, warned that Trump’s attacks against the judge that halted his travel ban might work against his administration when trying to overturn it in court. The Justice Department is seeking an emergency stay of U.S. District Judge James Robart’s order, according to the Trump administration.

Miller tweeted, “With every tweet, he is just making it harder and harder for DOJ attorneys to win in court. So keep it up, I guess.”

Mitt Romney on 2018 Senate run: 'All doors are open'

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“I don’t have any predictions on what I might do,” the former presidential candidate said.

02/04/17 3:48 PM



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Former ambassador: Trump's 'ill-considered ban' may have inspired threats to US


A former U.S. ambassador to Russia warned on Saturday that President Trump’s “ill-considered” executive order temporarily banning citizens from seven Muslim-majority countries may have inspired “dangerous” people to come to the U.S.

Saturday afternoon Trump tweeted out a defense of his travel ban and condemned the federal judge who issued a temporary restraining order on it.

“What is our country coming to when a judge can halt a Homeland Security travel ban and anyone, even with bad intentions, can come into U.S.?”, Trump tweeted.

“Because the ban was lifted by a judge, many very bad and dangerous people may be pouring into our country. A terrible decision,” he added.

In response to that second tweet, former Obama-appointed Ambassador to Russia Michael McFaul shot back, saying that for eight years under President Barack Obama, “such people didn’t pour into our country.”

“But maybe your ill-considered ban has inspired them now,” he continued. “Need some regular order at WH.”

McFaul later added: “I fully support Trump’s goal of preventing terrorists from entering our country, as long as the means for doing so are constitutional.”

The Trump administration has defended the 90-day travel restrictions for citizens from Iraq, Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen because these are “countries of concern” identified under the Obama administration.

Republican lawmaker given police escort due to rowdy protesters

Also from the Washington Examiner

Local reports say there were security concerns, including threats.

02/04/17 4:05 PM

Elsewhere a former Justice Department spokesman, Matthew Miller, warned that Trump’s attacks against the judge that halted his travel ban might work against his administration when trying to overturn it in court. The Justice Department is seeking an emergency stay of U.S. District Judge James Robart’s order, according to the Trump administration.

Miller tweeted, “With every tweet, he is just making it harder and harder for DOJ attorneys to win in court. So keep it up, I guess.”

DHS 'has suspended any and all actions' implementing Trump's order

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DHS confirmed that the Justice Department will file an emergency stay of judge’s order.

02/04/17 11:14 AM



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'Speed, but not haste': Media coverage in the age of Trump


Throughout his first two weeks in office, President Trump’s rapid-fire attempts to make good on several of his promises have kept those in the media on their toes. As an idiosyncratic politician with a platform distinct from either major party, coverage of this president and his actions is especially reliant on a case-by-case approach. Trump’s fast pace and lack of an overtly ideological vision can lead outlets to churn out critical and complimentary headlines about his decisions in a matter of hours.

Two prescient examples of this phenomenon emerged this week, as the president lifted a component of sanctions imposed on Russia by the Obama administration, while also hanging up the phone on Australian Prime Minister Malcom Turnbull after a disagreement about refugee resettlement.

About the first item, Trump’s rollback of a punitive sanction enacted specifically based on Russian interference in the 2016 election drew widespread confirmation of the conspiracy theory that the president really is a Putin puppet. Vanity Fair even labeled the president “Comrade Trump,” while the Washington Examiner‘s T. Becket Adams compiled a nice roundup of hysterical reactions to the move.

To their credit, BuzzFeed News, not always considered friendly territory for the Trump administration, pointed out that the trade implications of the president’s choice are primarily beneficial to the United States, not Russia. Per BuzzFeed News reporter, Anthony Cormier, “They [trade experts] say the new ‘general license’ is actually a limited measure designed to help U.S. companies maintain access to Russian buyers.” Cormier also quoted Douglas N. Jacobson, an international trade attorney, who suggested, “People need to take a deep breath and relax.”

Regarding Australia, Trump’s style likely had more to do with the subsequent negative reaction than substance. While Sens. McCain, R-Ariz., and Kaine, D-Va., referred to Trump’s spat with Turnbull as “unnecessary and harmful,” and “amateur hour,” respectively, some mainstream media coverage only months ago would have given the president high marks for seeming to accurately assess the “worst deal ever” had he done so a bit more mannerly.

Australia’s migrant and refugee program was characterized by The Wall Street Journal, New York Times and the United Nations as “cruel” just this past November. BuzzFeed News reporter Tom Gara stood out among a mostly unanimous panning of Trump’s abrupt end to the phone call by highlighting the aspects of this arrangement, and Australia’s system, which have been broadly construed as “inhumane.”

This all comes on the heels of a message from Reuters editor-in-chief, Steve Adler, whose reaffirmation of universal journalistic principles this week alluded to the degree which media organizations are trying to both find their footing in covering the administration, while also keeping up with a raft of daily breaking news. In defining how to cover Trump “the Reuters way,” Adler said: “We value speed but not haste: When something needs more checking, we take the time to check it. We try to avoid ‘permanent exclusives’ — first but wrong.”

Tamer Abouras (@iamtamerabouras) is a contributor to the Washington Examiner’s Beltway Confidential blog. He is a writer and editor from Williamstown, N.J.

If you would like to write an op-ed for the Washington Examiner, please read our guidelines on submissions here.

Republican lawmaker given police escort due to rowdy protesters

Also from the Washington Examiner

Local reports say there were security concerns, including threats.

02/04/17 4:05 PM

DHS 'has suspended any and all actions' implementing Trump's order

Top Story

DHS confirmed that the Justice Department will file an emergency stay of judge’s order.

02/04/17 11:14 AM



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Lady Gaga should follow Elvis Presley's example on political statements


In advance of his historic Madison Square Garden performances, Elvis Presley made himself available for a press conference. The year was 1972 and Vietnam continued to divide the nation. A reporter asked Elvis, a veteran, about his views on Vietnam protesters and asked if he would refuse his draft orders.

“Honey, I just … keep my own personal views to myself because I am just an entertainer and I would rather not say,” Elvis said. The reporter followed up by asking if other entertainers should do the same, and Elvis refused to even say that much.

Lady Gaga should be taking notes. As she prepares to entertain one of the largest viewing audiences in the world, speculation looms large that she may use the halftime show as a political platform. An avid supporter of Hillary Clinton, President Trump is likely in Gaga’s crosshairs.

Whether Gaga gets political is not a First Amendment issue, it’s a common sense issue. Let’s be honest, Lady Gaga was invited to perform at Super Bowl LI because she is an entertainer. Her political views did not get her the invite — her vocal chords did.

If she wants to lecture Trump or blast his policies, she has every right to do so. She can hold an event, press conference or beg to be booked on MSNBC. Odds are, however, she would never attract the number of viewers that she will have watching her on Sunday night.

The question is, is she willing to co-opt football so she can have her say at the expense of the viewers? This is not political activism by any stretch. Ask most people and they’ll say it is just plain rude and selfish.

But as we have witnessed in the months since Clinton’s defeat, protesters think bashing Trump justifies any foul behavior.

“Her fans would feel betrayed if she didn’t seize this moment in some way,” Billboard Senior Editor Jem Aswad told the Daily News. “I would be surprised if she didn’t do anything. The question is what she’s going to do and how extreme it is or isn’t going to be.”

If the National Football League were smart, they would pull the plug or publicly threaten to cut the mic if Lady Gaga goes off script. After a season in which viewership declined and highly paid athletes dishonored the national anthem, can the NFL really afford to end the season with Lady Gaga’s political antics?

Republican lawmaker given police escort due to rowdy protesters

Also from the Washington Examiner

Local reports say there were security concerns, including threats.

02/04/17 4:05 PM

Lady Gaga has an opportunity to show she is a lady. Her disdain for Trump is well known. Should she decide to just entertain, she would earn much respect and make a much bigger statement than some over-the-top typical liberal nonsense would. By not pushing her agenda at their game, she would show football fans that she has respect for them. She would also show the nation that Trump foes can take a break from bashing him to enjoy a national pastime meant to bring people together.

But if Lady Gaga can’t help herself, the only remedy will be for Trump’s friends Tom Brady and Robert Kraft of the New England Patriots to clean up the NFL’s mess by taking home the Lombardi trophy. They can Make Football Great Again.

Joseph Murray (@realJoeMurray) is a contributor to the Washington Examiner’s Beltway Confidential blog. Previously, he was a campaign official for Pat Buchanan. He is the author of “Odd Man Out” and is administrator of the LGBTrump Facebook page.

If you would like to write an op-ed for the Washington Examiner, please read our guidelines on submissions here.

Romney on 2018 Senate run: 'All doors are open'

Also from the Washington Examiner

“I don’t have any predictions on what I might do,” the former presidential candidate said.

02/04/17 3:48 PM

DHS 'has suspended any and all actions' implementing Trump's order

Top Story

DHS confirmed that the Justice Department will file an emergency stay of judge’s order.

02/04/17 11:14 AM



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Pence on Supreme Court pick: 'We're in the promise-keeping business'


Vice President Mike Pence made a promise Saturday that President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch will soon be confirmed to his seat.

“We’re in the promise-keeping business,” Pence told a crowd at a Federalist Society event in Philadelphia, citing a promise by Trump during his presidential campaign that he would nominate a conservative judge to replace the late Justice Antonin Scalia.

Democratic lawmakers have come out against Gorsuch’s nominee, and have also threatened to filibuster his confirmation hearings. However, Pence dismissed those threats.

“I believe Neil Gorsuch will soon take his seat as an associate justice on the Supreme Court of the United States,” Pence said to applause.

He cautioned Democrats against using a filibuster on Gorsuch, saying doing so “would be an unwise and and unprecedented act.”

According to Pence, no associate justice nominee to the court has ever faced a successful filibuster.

“And Justice Neil M. Gorsuch should not be the first,” he added.

“President Trump and I have full confidence that Judge Gorsuch will be confirmed,” Pence explained, adding, “We will work with the Senate leadership to ensure that Judge Gorsuch gets and up or down vote on the Senate floor one way or the other.”

His comments are a dig at Senate Democrats, who remain upset that GOP leaders declined to ever hold a hearing for President Obama’s nominee Merrick Garland.

Tesla CEO: 'Wrong' move to quit Trump advisory council in response to travel ban

Also from the Washington Examiner

Uber CEO left the business advisory council in response to backlash against the president’s travel ban.

02/04/17 1:01 PM

“This seat does not belong to any party or any ideology or any interest group. This seat on the Supreme Court belongs to the American people,” he concluded. “And the American people deserve a vote on the floor of the [U.S.] Senate.”

DHS 'has suspended any and all actions' implementing Trump's order

Top Story

DHS confirmed that the Justice Department will file an emergency stay of judge’s order.

02/04/17 11:14 AM



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Tesla CEO: 'Wrong' move to quit Trump advisory council in response to travel ban


Tesla CEO Elon Musk says it is the “wrong” move for business executives to drop out of the Trump administration’s business advisory council despite having objections to the president’s immigration order — something which Uber CEO Travis Kalanick did last week.

Musk apparently made good on a promise he made Thursday that he and other members would use the council’s meeting Friday to express their “objections to the recent executive order on immigration and offer suggestions for changes to the policy.”

He reported Saturday on Twitter that, “At my request, the agenda for yesterday’s White House meeting went from not mentioning the travel ban to having it be first and foremost.”

Musk added that he also brought up the climate at the meeting.

“I believe this is doing good, so will remain on council & keep at it. Doing otherwise would be wrong,” he concluded.

The President’s Strategic and Policy Forum, comprised of some of America’s leading business leaders, was created in early December to advise Trump and help him put together his economic agenda.

Both Musk and Kalanick were added to the group later in the month, rounding it out at 19 members, which includes executives from the Walt Disney Company, PepsiCo and General Motors.

But Kalanick, according to a memo made public Thursday, said he could no longer participate in the economic council because “the group was not meant to be an endorsement of the president or his agenda but unfortunately it has been misinterpreted to be exactly that.”

Trump’s executive order last Friday, which temporarily bans on immigrants from seven majority-Muslim countries, has been met with fierce resistance by Democrats and large protests nationwide. Even some Republicans have expressed dissatisfaction with the ban. It was blocked by a federal judge’s temporary restraining order on Friday.

Pence on Supreme Court pick: 'We're in the promise-keeping business'

Also from the Washington Examiner

“I believe Neil Gorsuch will soon take his seat as an associate justice on the Supreme Court.”

02/04/17 12:50 PM

In response to a Twitter user’s comment complaining about his time spent dealing with politics, Musk said he “[r]eally [doesn’t] want to get in politics,” adding, “I just want to help invent and develop technologies that improve lives. Feels so bizarre.”

In his statement Thursday, Musk said that “[a]dvisory councils simply provide advice and attending does not mean that I agree with actions by the Administration.”

“My goals are to accelerate the world’s transition to sustainable energy and to help make humanity a multi-planet civilization, a consequence of which will be the creation of hundreds of thousands of jobs and a more inspiring future for all,” Musk said.

“I understand the perspective of those who object to my attending this meeting, but I believe at this time that engaging on critical issues will on balance serve the greater good.”

Defense Secretary Mattis: No extra forces needed in Persian Gulf region

Also from the Washington Examiner

Comments follow Trump’s national security adviser Michael Flynn saying the U.S was putting Iran “on notice.”

02/04/17 12:09 PM

DHS 'has suspended any and all actions' implementing Trump's order

Top Story

DHS confirmed that the Justice Department will file an emergency stay of judge’s order.

02/04/17 11:14 AM



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Report: Buzzfeed sued for story on unverified dossier


Buzzfeed is being sued by a Russian tech firm after it published the company owner’s name in a report last month on an unverified dossier concerning President Trump, according to a report Friday.

XBT Holdings, a Cyprus-based company owned by Russian tech magnate Aleksej Gubarev, has filed defamation lawsuits against Buzzfeed, its editor-in-chief, Ben Smith, and former British intelligence agent Christopher Steele, McClathy reported Friday.

“The dossier included libelous, unverified and untrue allegations regarding XBT, Webzilla and Gubarev. The lawsuits seek yet undetermined compensation for the damages suffered by XBT, Webzilla and Gubarev as the result of the publication of the dossier,” according to a statement.

The dossier alleged that XBT and its affiliates worked with the 2016 Trump presidential campaign, “using botnets and porn traffic to transmit viruses, plant bugs, steal data and conduct ‘altering operations’ against the Democratic Party leadership.”

In a statement obtained by McClathy, a Buzzfeed spokesman said, “We have redacted Mr. Gubarev’s name from the published dossier, and apologize for including it.”

The 35-page dossier purportedly contained details on compromising personal and financial activities conducted by President Trump that are allegedly in Russia’s possession, leaving him open to blackmail. Steele, an ex-British intelligence officer who is a director of Orbis Business Intelligence, a London-based private security firm, prepared the dossier.

Buzzfeed was widely condemned for publishing a document in which there were unverified sections and errors.

Trump called BuzzFeed News a “failing pile of garbage” after they released the information.

Defense Secretary Mattis: No extra forces needed in Persian Gulf region

Also from the Washington Examiner

Comments follow Trump’s national security adviser Michael Flynn saying the U.S was putting Iran “on notice.”

02/04/17 12:09 PM

DHS 'has suspended any and all actions' implementing Trump's order

Top Story

DHS confirmed that the Justice Department will file an emergency stay of judge’s order.

02/04/17 11:14 AM



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If you don't like Milo Yiannopoulos, ignore him


Wednesday night’s riots at the University of California, Berkeley in response to Breitbart editor and professional provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos’ scheduled talk is certainly troubling, and it should be condemned.

Many people, not just liberals and progressives, view Yiannopoulos’ act as distasteful, grotesque and offensive. Some argue he’s good for society, while others believe he’s a wart on the underbelly of society that needs to be dealt with.

I have a better solution. For those who don’t like Yiannopoulos, the best way to counteract his message is this: ignore him.

Give Milo the “Sarah Palin treatment.”

What did the media and folks on the Left do after Sarah Palin ran on John McCain’s ticket in 2008? They gradually reduced her influence by not making everything she said or did a national headline.

Sarah Palin’s influence is now reduced to seldom-watched television game shows like “Match Game.”

Albeit, people didn’t vociferously protest Palin like they do Milo, or even other prominent conservatives like Gavin McInnes, Ben Shapiro, or President Trump.

Yiannopoulos has generated the sort of fame and stardom that includes a six-figure book deal with Simon and Schuster not because of his message, but what he represents.

He’s not a neo-Nazi or a white supremacist like some would characterize. He’s a gay Jew from Kent, England who doesn’t fit into the construct or stereotype that society has deemed appropriate for people of those backgrounds.

Schumer: Trump attacks on judges raises bar 'even higher' for Gorsuch

Also from the Washington Examiner

Earlier in the day, the president criticized a “so-called” judge for a restraining order on his travel ban.

02/04/17 10:40 AM

While Yiannopoulos had been writing for Breitbart for a couple years and had been touring college campuses, he hadn’t truly gained prominence until mid-2016. Milo was banned from Twitter for allegedly targeting and trolling actress Leslie Jones and violating the social media site’s terms and conditions after panning the “Ghostbusters” film reboot.

There are few people who don’t have an opinion on Yiannopoulos. Either they’ve heard of him and have very strong positive or negative feelings, or they haven’t heard of him at all.

It’s time for us in the media (including me) to stop giving this real life troll, who calls Trump “Daddy,” the attention he desperately craves.

For people like Milo, attention is his oxygen. Without it, his personal brand will die and he’ll fade into obscurity.

Siraj Hashmi (@SirajHashmi) is a contributor to the Washington Examiner’s Beltway Confidential blog. He is an assistant editor at Red Alert Politics (which is also published by the Washington Examiner’s publisher, MediaDC).

Donna Brazile: Gorsuch 'more extreme' than Scalia

Also from the Washington Examiner

Interim DNC chair said Trump nominated Gorsuch to fill “the stolen Supreme Court seat.”

02/04/17 10:16 AM

If you would like to write an op-ed for the Washington Examiner, please read our guidelines on submissions here.

Supreme Court filibuster: The Left demands Democrats block Gorsuch

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Even before Trump, Supreme Court nomination fights had become increasingly contentious over the past thirty years.

02/03/17 11:52 PM



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Schumer: Trump attacks on judges raises bar 'even higher' for Gorsuch


Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer fired a warning shot at President Trump and his Supreme Court nominee after Trump sent out a Saturday morning tweet criticizing a federal judge in Seattle for implementing a nationwide restraining order on his executive order barring citizens from seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S.

Early Saturday morning, Trump expressed his dissatisfaction with the “opinion of this so-called judge,” on the morning after Judge James Robart slapped a temporary restraining order on the president’s one-week old executive action that temporarily banned non-U.S. citizens from Somalia, Iran, Iraq, Sudan, Syria, Libya and Yemen.

He said the move “is ridiculous and will be overturned!”

“The President’s attack on Judge James Robart, a Bush appointee who passed with 99 votes, shows a disdain for an independent judiciary that doesn’t always bend to his wishes and a continued lack of respect for the Constitution, making it more important that the Supreme Court serve as an independent check on the administration,” Schumer said in a statement.

“With each action testing the Constitution, and each personal attack on a judge, President Trump raises the bar even higher for Judge Gorsuch’s nomination to serve on the Supreme Court,” Schumer added. His ability to be an independent check will be front and center throughout the confirmation process.”

Most Senate Democrats already oppose Trump’s pick to fill what many are calling a “stolen” Supreme Court seat, a reference to the Senate Republicans’ refusal to hold a confirmation hearing for Obama’s pick to take Scalia’s place, Judge Merrick Garland, during an election year that would choose a new chief executive. In the Democrats’ weekly address, Sen. Ed Markey accused Trump of “trying to rig the Supreme Court against hardworking Americans.”

Still, some Senate Democrats, like West Virginia’s Joe Manchin, are willing to give Gorsuch a chance in the confirmation process.

Supreme Court filibuster: The Left demands Democrats block Gorsuch

Top Story

Even before Trump, Supreme Court nomination fights had become increasingly contentious over the past thirty years.

02/03/17 11:52 PM



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Media's nonrefundable ticket to the Trump show


It’s come to this: President Trump performs a basic part of his job and the news media tell the public he’s turned it into an unbecoming Hollywood production.

At the White House this week Trump announced his pick to fill the vacant Supreme Court seat, as he’s required to do by the Constitution.

He let everyone know on Twitter last week that he was set to make his decision. Then on Monday, he said it would be “announced live on Tuesday at 8 p.m.”

He came out to a White House podium, delivered some remarks about his choice, Appellate Judge Neil Gorsuch, and then let the nominee speak.

The unremarkable series of standard constitutional events was described by the Daily Beast as Trump “in peak reality-TV form.”

CNN’s Dylan Byers said Trump had turned “one of the most consequential decisions of the presidency into a primetime television event.” (Incidentally, Byers’ own report undercut that assessment by citing an administration official who said the event was modeled after President George W. Bush’s announcement of John Roberts as his nomination for chief justice, though that announcement came during the morning.)

Mike Allen, at Axios, said the Gorsuch announcement had an “‘Apprentice’ aura,” a reference to the popular NBC reality TV game show formerly starring Trump.

Every one of Trump’s moves is depicted by the news media as a TV show, a belittling comparison intended to marginalize Trump’s big moments. And it comes with the implication that Trump is trivializing the presidency.

A Politico report acknowledged that Trump’s Gorsuch announcement was uneventful. Yet, the same report called Trump “a political P.T. Barnum” and said he “pulled off a plot twist of sorts … by conducting a low-key rollout rather than the prime-time reality television spectacle he and his advisers had been hyping for days.”

Trump singles out 'so-called' judge for 'ridiculous' restraining order on travel ban

Also from the Washington Examiner

“Interesting that certain Middle-Eastern countries agree with the ban.”

02/04/17 8:38 AM

Was it Trump’s plot twist or the media’s?

Trump packed the very early days of his presidency with meetings with business leaders, union heads and pharmaceutical executives. Like Barack Obama, and presidents before, Trump brought some of the press into the meeting for a “spray,” an opportunity for photos and video footage, and offered some remarks about the purpose of the gathering.

He has also signed a slew of executive orders and when he did, he let the press in so he could show his signature to the cameras and explain the order’s intent.

It’s an obvious way to show the public what he’s doing each day and it’s not a wild assumption that citizens would like to know how the government’s highest official is conducting business.

Otherwise, why are the cameras there?

Report: Buzzfeed sued for story on unverified dossier

Also from the Washington Examiner

The 35-page dossier contained what purported to be damaging information about President Trump.

02/04/17 8:13 AM

But Brian Stelter at CNN dubbed what he saw as “Donald Trump’s photo op presidency” and said Trump was “back in his element, hosting a show, this time not in the ‘Apprentice’ boardroom but in the Oval Office.”

An NPR headline read, “With Conflict And Drama, Trump Hooks You Like A Reality TV Show.”

Since when did the national media find itself so dazzled by “conflict and drama”?

It’s what the industry thrives on.

CNN promos for the Republican primary debates showed close-up mugshots of each of the candidates with a shadow phasing across their faces accompanied by a climaxing percussion soundtrack. Next to that, watching Trump sign executive orders is like staring at the Mona Lisa.

When Hillary Clinton arrived in Washington on Inauguration Day, an always helpful CNN put up a split-screen that showed her on one side and Trump on the other. The network described it as “a split-screen for the ages.”

On Jan. 5, NPR, in its usual staid manner, asked, “Are Trump And U.S. Intelligence Community Headed For A Showdown?”

Every time Jimmy Fallon does one of his awfully unfunny Trump impressions, MSNBC runs it the next day at the top of nearly every hour.

CNN starts a countdown clock for viewers whenever House Speaker Paul Ryan enters the restroom.

But the national media say it is Trump who has turned the presidency into “primetime television.”

The alternative is for Trump to hide. That would work for reporters who see it as their role to bring Trump down a notch. But they’re not the ones who elected him and expect to see results.

Eddie Scarry is a media reporter for the Washington Examiner. Thinking of submitting an op-ed to the Washington Examiner? Be sure to read our guidelines on submissions.

Supreme Court filibuster: The Left demands Democrats block Gorsuch

Top Story

Even before Trump, Supreme Court nomination fights had become increasingly contentious over the past thirty years.

02/03/17 11:52 PM



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