Day: February 3, 2017

r960-n_daae97f85d15ebaa7b1598dc054f7e19.jpg

Obamacare enrollment sluggish in final weeks


Last-minute Obamacare enrollments dropped significantly this year compared to last year, as the debate over Republican vows to repeal and replace the law heats up.

A total of more than 9.2 million people selected health plans on the federal healthcare.gov website during its fourth annual enrollment season, the administration announced Friday. But just around 400,000 people signed up in the last two weeks, compared to nearly 700,000 signups in the final week of enrollment last year.

Republicans quickly jumped on the announcement to broadcast their dire analysis of the law. Kevin Brady, chairman of the Ways and Means Committee which is working on an Obamacare repeal bill, said the numbers only partially reflect what he sees as the law’s failings.

“The enrollment numbers released today only tell a fraction of Obamacare’s disappointing story — for instance, the fact that these numbers are the result of a law that forces Americans to sign up for insurance they don’t want or need,” Brady said in a statement. “These numbers also don’t show that costs are soaring, access to the care people want is shrinking, choices of insurers are dwindling, and taxes are rising.”

Supporters of Obamacare have chastized a decision by President Trump’s administration to scale back Obamacare outreach and advertising once he took office, with just a week and a half remaining in the signup season. They charged that it was an effort to sabotage the program by depriving it of customers, particularly the young and healthy ones who are critical to the program and tend to sign up at the last minute.

“There is no doubt that enrollment would have been even higher if not for the uncertainty caused by political attacks on the law, and the Trump administration’s decision not to provide consumers with all of the resources and support available to help them enroll,” said Anne Filipic, president of Enroll America.

It’s still unclear whether the Obama administration’s goal of nearly 13.8 million plan selections will be met, as the total doesn’t include enrollments from the 12 states running their own marketplaces.

The announcement from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services had a marked change of tone from the Obama administration, which had often sought to cast the healthcare law in the most positive light. CMS instead emphasized some of healthcare.gov’s shortcomings, noting that premiums rose overall and there were fewer plans available for purchase.

“Those selections were made from a market that experienced a 25 percent increase over the previous year in the average premium for the benchmark second-lowest cost silver plan as well as a 28 percent decline in the number of issuers participating over the past year,” the announcement said.

Trump responds to refugee ban critics: The 'citizens of this country are my total priority'

Also from the Washington Examiner

President Trump’s second weekly address hit six topics, encompassing top news from the week.

02/03/17 6:00 PM

Health and Human Services spokesman Matt Lloyd said the administration looks forward to replacing the healthcare law.

“Obamacare has failed the American people, with one broken promise after another,” Lloyd said. “We look forward to providing relief to those who are being harmed by the status quo and pursuing patient-centered solutions that will work for the American people.”

Of the 9.2 million signups, about 3 million were from new customers and about 6.2 million were returning customers.

Puzder's ex-wife disavows prior claims of domestic violence

Top Story

Puzder’s ex-wife said that she falsely made the charge during their divorce due to her anger over their break-up.

02/03/17 5:01 PM



Source link

r960-6b360383664c326946d0ccc4b0b03e75.jpg

Poll: Trump's job approval rating lags behind his predecessors


This marks the highest disapproval rating of any new commander in chief in recent history. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

More than half of the public disapproves of President Trump’s job performance during his first few days in office, according to a CNN/ORC poll released Friday.

Fifty-three percent of Americans said they are unimpressed with Trump’s handling of his job after a jam-packed two weeks that saw 19 executive orders and several hiccups inside the administration. This marks the highest disapproval rating of any new commander in chief in recent history.

Only 10 percent self-identified Democrats approve of the president’s performance, while a full 90 percent of Republicans believe he is on the right track. For comparison, former President George W. Bush held a 57 percent approval rating at this point during his first term, with only a quarter of Americans disapproving.

While other polls have shown Trump garnering wide support for his decision to halt immigration from seven Muslim-majority countries, the CNN/ORC survey found that 53 oppose the executive order. Another 60 percent oppose the president’s pledge to build a wall along the southern border.

Nearly 80 percent of voters said Trump has so far behaved the way they expected he would as president, with 21 percent saying his handling of the job has surprised them.

The survey of 1,002 U.S. adults was conducted between Jan. 31-Feb. 2. Results contain a margin of error plus or minus 3 percentage points.

Obamacare enrollment drops significantly in final weeks

Top Story

Just around 400,000 people signed up in the last two weeks, compared to nearly 700,000 signups last year.

02/03/17 4:48 PM

Subscribe to Alerts

Learn more about Washington Examiner’s Alerts

Loading Next Article



Source link

r960-9ae5c435c0f911130cdf56bbfbb15630.jpg

Pelosi loses in 2-1 vote upholding ban of embattled student artwork


House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi made a vigorous but ultimately futile argument on Friday to keep student artwork hanging near the Capitol that portrays police as pigs, noting other politically themed paintings remain on the wall.

The controversial painting was selected as part of a student art competition in Rep. William Lacy Clay’s district. The Missouri Democrat hung it in the Capitol, and Republicans immediately demanded that it should be taken down.

After the Architect of the Capitol agreed the painting should be removed, Pelosi appealed the decision to the House Office Building Commission. Pelosi herself sits on that panel, which also includes House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., and House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif.

The panel rejected her appeal in a 2-1 vote, as Ryan and McCarthy voted to uphold the Architect’s decision, and Pelosi voted to reverse it.

Pelosi argued that there were other paintings hung in the Capitol showing “subjects of contemporary controversy” that were not removed. She specifically noted a portrait of Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt, who ran in the Democratic primary against Hillary Clinton, a painting depicting a “bleeding immigrant with a black eye,” and a picture showing an American flag beneath a pair of Converse sneakers.

“I asked the HOBC to agree that removing the painting was wrong and the Architect’s decision should be reversed,” Pelosi wrote in a letter to Clay. “I regret that the majority of the HOBC chose to uphold the Architect’s decision.”

The painting by Clay’s constituent had been displayed on the wall for seven months before GOP lawmakers became incensed and removed it several times. Clay then replaced it until the Architect stepped in and took it down permanently, citing a rule prohibiting “subjects of contemporary political controversy or a sensationalistic or gruesome nature.”

But Pelosi called the repeated removal of the Clay painting by GOP lawmakers “embarrassing” and the Architect’s decision to take it down permanently as “unprecedented,” noting it is the first time artwork has been removed from the wall since the contest began in 1982.

Pelosi pointed out that the artwork was approved for the wall and then disqualified retroactively, months later.

Obamacare repeal hurts opioid abuse fight, Democrats say

Also from the Washington Examiner

23 senators say gutting the law would pull $5.5 billion in one year for addiction and mental health services.

02/03/17 3:57 PM

Pelosi also cited a point made by Clay in an earlier letter to Ryan that suggests removal of the painting violates the First Amendment.

Ryan’s office issued a statement Friday noting the ruling of the HOBC and that the rule disqualifying the painting was initially instituted in 2007, when Pelosi was serving as House speaker.

Read Pelosi’s letter to Clay here:

So about Trump supposedly not recording his phone call with Vladimir Putin

Also from the Washington Examiner

So is there a recording or isn’t there? That’s a great question, and I’m not sure what the answer is.

02/03/17 3:09 PM

Democrats want Trump to release membership list for Mar-a-lago

Top Story

Dems want information to “dispel any suspicions” that the wealthy are purchasing access to the president.

02/03/17 1:37 PM



Source link

r960-06cf074c5467bacdb0ea7ec3958a45a2.jpg

So about Trump supposedly not recording his phone call with Vladimir Putin


President Trump may or may not have recorded his call this weekend with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Nobody knows. And the sole source of a story this week alleging White House staffers shut off recording devices for the international call clarified Thursday that he has no idea if that or anything like it actually happened.

Trump spoke with Putin Saturday. Details of their exchange are extremely sparse, and the White House released only this vague statement describing the conversation:

President Donald J. Trump received a congratulatory call today from Russian President Vladimir Putin. The call lasted approximately one hour and ranged in topics from mutual cooperation in defeating ISIS to efforts in working together to achieve more peace throughout the world including Syria. The positive call was a significant start to improving the relationship between the United States and Russia that is in need of repair. Both President Trump and President Putin are hopeful that after today’s call the two sides can move quickly to tackle terrorism and other important issues of mutual concern.

On Wednesday, the vice president of the right-leaning American Foreign Policy Council, Ilan Berman, suggested at a panel discussion that there is, “no readout of the Trump-Putin call [because the White House] turned off recording.”

Turkish journalist Ilhan Tanir tweeted Berman’s comments at 9 a.m.

The next day at around 11 a.m., Raw Story published a report titled, “Foreign policy insider: ‘No readout of Trump-Putin call because White House turned off recording.”

The story was noticed immediately, gathering thousands of shares on social media in just a few hours. An author and activist named Geraldine then shared Raw Story’s report with her more than 26,000 followers, and she, too, garnered thousands of shares within hours. Outlets far more hostile to the Trump administration, including Daily Kos and Salon, followed Raw Story’s lead, publishing articles that included Berman’s supposedly shocking revelation.

But as the story continued to pick up steam, Berman chimed in with a fairly important clarification.

Flynn: US will 'no longer tolerate Iran's provocations'

Also from the Washington Examiner

“Iran’s senior leadership continues to threaten the United States and our allies,” Flynn charged.

02/03/17 3:08 PM

“[For what it’s worth], I don’t know for a fact that they turned it off,” he said Thursday afternoon. “Was merely saying it was curious that a [recording] didn’t seem to exist.”

He reiterated later that his initial comment was, “conjecture, not direct knowledge.”

As of this writing, Raw Story’s original note on Twitter has been re-tweeted more than 10,000 times. Geraldine’s tweet has been shared more than 40,000 times.

Berman’s clarification has been re-tweeted 28 times.

So is there a recording or isn’t there? That’s a great question, and I’m not sure what the answer is. The White House did not respond to my request for comment. What I do know, however, is that the sole source for this entire story has clarified that he doesn’t know if it actually happened.

White House dodges on Pence's plans for DeVos vote

Also from the Washington Examiner

GOP Sens. Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski announced that they will not vote for DeVos.

02/03/17 2:57 PM

But hey, at least the story got plenty of clicks on social media. Great job, guys.

Raw Story amended its article Friday afternoon to reflect that Berman was just spitballing and not stating a fact. Here’s a copy of their report as it originally appeared:

Democrats want Trump to release membership list for Mar-a-lago

Top Story

Dems want information to “dispel any suspicions” that the wealthy are purchasing access to the president.

02/03/17 1:37 PM



Source link

r960-b749f067cb4a99440da243e458d0f831.jpg

White House dodges on Pence's plans for DeVos vote


The White House on Friday refused to say whether Vice President Mike Pence is planning to be in the Senate early next week in case he’s needed to help get Betsy DeVos confirmed as President Trump’s secretary of education.

Republican Sens. Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski announced earlier this week that they will not vote for DeVos on the Senate floor, and unless a Democrat decides to support her, Pence would be needed to break a possible 50-50 tie and get her confirmed.

When asked about this possibility, White House spokesman Sean Spicer said only that the administration would do all it can to ensure she is confirmed.

“I hope that vote gets 60, 70 votes,” Spicer said. “She is an unbelievable, remarkable woman who has fought very hard to improve our nation’s education system and to make sure that school are serving children.”

“I think that we’re going to make sure we do everything we can, and we feel 100 percent confident that she will be confirmed Monday night and be the next secretary of education,” he said.

Republican leaders are confident that DeVos will prevail in the vote scheduled for Monday evening, but as of Friday, it seemed likely that Pence would be needed.

Early Friday morning, the Senate voted 52-48 to end debate on DeVos, setting up a vote early next week. But in that vote, Collins and Murkowski are not expected to support her. If they vote “no” on the nomination and nothing else changes, the result would be a 50-50 tie assuming all senators vote.

White House won't rule out military action against Iran after sanctions

Top Story

“I would never rule anything off the table,” Sean Spicer said regarding the possibility of military action against Iran.

02/03/17 1:04 PM



Source link

r960-578420fc0e01119e15a8c755f657da0e.jpg

Gorsuch's record shows strong support for the First Amendment view of campaign finance laws


President Trump made perhaps his most important decision to date with the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court. In Gorsuch, Trump has chosen a strong defender of the Constitution and the First Amendment.

In his time on the United States Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit, Gorsuch consistently wrote or joined pro-free speech rulings. The Center for Competitive Politics found four cases Gorsuch has ruled on concerning press freedom, one case concerning petition rights, and one case on contribution limits. In each instance, he came down on the side of the First Amendment.

In one case, Gorsuch analyzed government harassment and its effect on a citizen’s ability to exercise his First Amendment rights.

The plaintiff alleged that he was physically and verbally intimidated by a Sheriff Deputy to deter him from filing a tax appeal. Gorsuch overturned a district court’s dismissal and remanded the case for further proceedings.

Gorsuch wrote a robust defense of the right to petition government: “[A] private citizen exercises a constitutionally protected First Amendment right anytime he or she petitions the government for redress; the petitioning clause of the First Amendment does not pick and choose its causes. The minor and questionable, along with the mighty and consequential, are all embraced.”

Critics of campaign finance laws will be particularly heartened by Gorsuch’s concurring opinion in the contribution limit case Riddle v. Hickenlooper. Riddle was a challenge to Colorado’s contribution limit laws, which allowed Democratic and Republican candidates to raise twice as much money as minor party and independent candidates. The majority struck down the law as a violation of the equal protection clause.

More interesting than that is Gorsuch’s concurring opinion in the case. He expressed “some uncertainty about the level of scrutiny the Supreme Court wishes us to apply” to contribution limit cases, and signaled that he might support the application of strict scrutiny, the most stringent standard of judicial review. If that were to happen, contribution limits and other restrictions on political speech and association would have a much tougher time in court.

Political speech has been a hot button issue for years. Hillary Clinton promised, if elected, to nominate a justice who would overturn Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, the 2010 decision that protects corporations’ ability to speak out in support of or opposition to candidates. That 5-4 ruling appears to be in safe hands with a future Justice Gorsuch.

In addition to his good judgment, Gorsuch’s writing is laudable for its clarity and eloquence. He is a fitting choice to fill the seat formerly occupied by the late Justice Antonin Scalia, even if no one can match Scalia’s dry wit.

White House dodges on Pence's plans for DeVos vote

Also from the Washington Examiner

The White House on Friday refused to say whether Vice President Mike Pence is planning to be in the Senate early next week in case he’s needed to help get Betsy DeVos confirmed as President Trump’s secretary of education.

Republican Sens. Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski announced earlier this week that they will not vote for DeVos on the Senate floor, and unless a Democrat decides to support her, Pence would be needed to break a possible 50-50 tie and get her confirmed.

When asked about this possibility, White House spokesman Sean Spicer said only that the administration would do all it can to ensure she is confirmed.

“I hope that vote gets 60, 70 votes,” Spicer said.

02/03/17 2:57 PM

Trump’s public statements on free speech have at times been troubling, but he has surrounded himself with wise counsel and in his nomination of Gorsuch, it paid off. On the most important decision facing his new administration, the selection of the next justice of the Supreme Court, Trump chose a man with rigor and a deep respect for First Amendment rights.

That’s great news for the First Amendment and free speech.

David Keating is a contributor to the Washington Examiner’s Beltway Confidential blog. He is president of the Center for Competitive Politics and was previously the executive director of Club for Growth.

If you would like to write an op-ed for the Washington Examiner, please read our guidelines on submissions here.

Schumer vows 'Democratic firewall' to protect banking regulations

Also from the Washington Examiner

Democrats are in the minority and have little power to block Trump’s executive order, at least legislatively.

02/03/17 2:55 PM

White House won't rule out military action against Iran after sanctions

Top Story

“I would never rule anything off the table,” Sean Spicer said regarding the possibility of military action against Iran.

02/03/17 1:04 PM



Source link

r960-b11e564724019c854cd66f02f61f3fef.jpg

F-35 cost drops to below $100 million per plane for first time


The government has reached an agreement with Lockheed Martin for the 10th batch of F-35 aircraft, bringing the cost of one variant below $100 million per plane for the first time.

The cost of this batch is $728 million less than the last one, a drop of nearly 8 percent, Lockheed said in a statement.

President Trump on Monday took credit for driving the cost down, although experts pointed out that the savings were on their way before he took office. The Lockheed statement thanked Trump for his involvement but stopped short of saying he reduced the cost.

“President Trump’s personal involvement in the F-35 program accelerated the negotiations and sharpened our focus on driving down the price,” Lockheed said. “The agreement was reached in a matter of weeks and represents significant savings over previous contracts.”

Reaching that cost milestone means the price has dropped about 60 percent per plane from the first lot of aircraft, a natural result of manufacturers learning as they go and increasing efficiencies.

“The LRIP-10 contract is a good and fair deal for the taxpayers, the U.S. government, allies and industry,” said Lt. Gen. Chris Bogdan, F-35 program executive officer. LRIP refers to low-rate initial production. “We continue to work with industry to drive costs out of the program.”

The tenth lot is for 90 aircraft, including 55 for the U.S. military and 35 for international partners and customers the United Kingdom, Norway, Australian, Turkey, Japan, Israel and South Korea.

In this lot, an F-35A, the variant used by the Air Force and international partners, will cost $94.6 million. The B version used by the Marine Corps, which can take off and land vertically, will cost $122.8 million. And the C version that can take off and land from Navy aircraft carriers will cost $121.8 million. All three variants saw a drop in price.

The Pentagon awarded a $6.1 billion contract for the ninth batch of 57 low-rate initiation production aircraft in November after Lockheed and the department failed to reach an agreement to award contracts for lots nine and 10 together.

The press just can't help itself when it comes to salacious gun-related headlines

Also from the Washington Examiner

The press predictably botched the story with deeply unfair and misleading headlines.

02/03/17 1:46 PM

The cost per plane has gone down in each lot as Lockheed learns lessons that make future work go more quickly and smoothly. The cost also goes down as the service buys more planes since the one-time costs of production are spread between more airframes.

President Trump, who has repeatedly taken on the expensive F-35 acquisition program on Twitter, has met with Lockheed Martin CEO Marillyn Hewson multiple times since the election. Both times, she promised the president that she would work to bring the cost down “significantly.”

“He asks excellent questions and he’s really focused on making sure that the cost comes down on the program,” Hewson said in a call to report the company’s 2016 fourth quarter earnings. “It’s not about slashing our profit, it’s not about our margins. When we have those discussions, it’s about how do we get the cost of the aircraft down today and in the future.”

The program is the most expensive ever undertaken by the Pentagon, at a cost of about $1 trillion, though that number covers the entire life cycle of the platform.

Democrats demand Mar-a-Lago membership list

Also from the Washington Examiner

Dems want information to “dispel any suspicions” that the wealthy are purchasing access to the president.

02/03/17 1:37 PM

White House won't rule out military action against Iran after sanctions

Top Story

“I would never rule anything off the table,” Sean Spicer said regarding the possibility of military action against Iran.

02/03/17 1:04 PM



Source link

r960-e62f15946a9bae3f0f3a8aed5bc630c5.jpg

Report: Pence is going to the Super Bowl


He's the fourth sitting VP to go to the Super Bowl. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Vice President Mike Pence is scheduled to attend Sunday’s Super Bowl between the Atlanta Falcons and the New England Patriots, according to CNN.

Pence will join former President George H.W. Bush in attendance at the Super Bowl. Bush is set to perform the coin toss before the game.

Pence is the fourth sitting vice president to attend the game. Spiro Agnew, Bush and Al Gore all also attended the game when they were vice president.

Security is likely going to be even tighter for the game with Pence in attendance. The Super Bowl, one of the most-watched television events of the year, is already one of the most secure events for the Department of Homeland Security and the presence of high-ranking elected officials usually ramps up those procedures.

Democrats proving powerless to stop President Trump's Cabinet

Top Story

Senate Democrats have little to show for trying to stall President Trump’s nominees ahead of a bruising Supreme Court confirmation fight.

02/03/17 4:00 AM

Subscribe to Alerts

Learn more about Washington Examiner’s Alerts

Loading Next Article



Source link

r960-1bb3037d60048ebc9dfec617e8fe4e0b.jpg

Air Force F-35 performing well against 'complex' threats in first Red Flag exercise


The Air Force’s variant of the F-35 is doing “very, very well” at its first Red Flag training exercise, where it’s facing advanced threats at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada.

Lt. Col. George Watkins, the 34th Fighter Squadron commander, said Thursday that 13 F-35As from Hill Air Force Base are participating in Red Flag and had flown 110 missions so far.

While the F-35B, the Marine Corps variant that can take off and land vertically, participated in last year’s iteration of the exercise, this is the first showing for the A variant, which takes off and lands on a runway. It’s the version being purchased by the Air Force as well as most international partners, such as Australia and the United Kingdom, which also participated in the exercise.

The Lockheed Martin fifth-generation joint strike fighter’s kill ratio was 15 aggressors killed for every one F-35 taken out, but Watkins stressed that a perfect ratio would signify that the training exercise wasn’t hard enough and wouldn’t benefit pilots trying to prepare for combat.

“If we didn’t suffer a few losses, it wouldn’t be challenging enough, so we’d have to go back and redo it. So there are some threats out there that make it through because of their sheer numbers and the advanced threats that they’re shooting at us. So we have had one or two losses so far in our training,” he said. “That’s good for the pilots.”

Watkins flew F-16s in four previous Red Flag exercises, and said the threats faced in 2017 were “significantly more complex and aggressive” than in past years.

“I’ve never seen a Red Flag like this where they put up as many advanced threats against us,” he said.

President Trump has criticized the F-35 for being so expensive and has had direct conversations with Lockheed Martin’s CEO, Marillyn Hewson, to work to reduce costs. He has also suggested that he would promote competition for future fighter jets between Lockheed Martin and Boeing, which makes the fourth-generation F/A-18 Super Hornet, and said that he asked Boeing to price out a version of the Super Hornet that’s comparable to the F-35.

Asked to compare the two platforms, Watkins refused to do so, saying that it’s “apples to oranges,” a sentiment echoed by former service leaders as well.

Chelsea Clinton takes swipe at Kellyanne Conway over 'Bowling Green Massacre'

Also from the Washington Examiner

Chelsea Clinton took a swipe at White House senior adviser Kellyanne Conway on Friday for wrongly referencing a “massacre” that actually never took place.

In a tweet on Friday morning, Clinton referenced an attack in France and said: “Very grateful no one seriously hurt in the Louvre attack …or the (completely fake) Bowling Green Massacre. Please don’t make up attacks.”

Very grateful no one seriously hurt in the Louvre attack …or the (completely fake) Bowling Green Massacre. Please don't make up attacks.

02/03/17 12:09 PM

“From my perspective, the F-35 has been living up to what it was expected to do,” Watkins said.

Democrats proving powerless to stop President Trump's Cabinet

Top Story

Senate Democrats have little to show for trying to stall President Trump’s nominees ahead of a bruising Supreme Court confirmation fight.

02/03/17 4:00 AM



Source link

wex-logo_1200x630-facebook.jpg

Former Obama Justice Department official in new ad: 'I'm 100 percent comfortable with Judge Gorsuch'


The Judicial Crisis Network unveiled a new ad on Friday showing an Obama administration Justice Department official saying, “I’m 100 percent comfortable with Judge Gorsuch becoming our next Supreme Court justice.”

Jane Nitze, who worked for the Justice Department and clerked for left-leaning Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, boosted President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, who Nitze clerked for in 2008 and 2009.

“I don’t think folks on the left should be concerned about Judge Gorsuch becoming a Supreme Court justice,” Nitze says in the ad. “He is extraordinarily fair-minded. He will approach each case the same regardless of the issue or the parties before him. And he will have a great deal of respect for folks on all sides of the ideological spectrum.”

The ad will run on television in Colorado and Washington, D.C., and three predominantly red states where Democratic senators are up for re-election in 2018: Indiana, Missouri, and North Dakota. The ad is part of the first-phase of a $10 million campaign pushing for Gorsuch’s confirmation to the high court.

Democrats proving powerless to stop President Trump's Cabinet

Top Story

Senate Democrats have little to show for trying to stall President Trump’s nominees ahead of a bruising Supreme Court confirmation fight.

02/03/17 4:00 AM

Subscribe to Alerts

Learn more about Washington Examiner’s Alerts

Loading Next Article



Source link