Month: November 2016

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Louisiana Democrat to lead Congressional Black Caucus


The Congressional Black Caucus, which is mostly Democrats and exclusive to African-Americans, elected Cedric Richmond in a secret ballot. (AP Photo)

Louisiana Rep. Cedric Richmond was elected chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus on Wednesday.

Richmond, whose district includes most of New Orleans, has represented Louisiana’s 2nd congressional district since 2011. He will take the post at the start of the new congress in early January, replacing outgoing Chairman Rep. G.K. Butterfield, D-N.C.

The influential caucus, which is mostly Democrats and exclusive to African-Americans, elected Richmond in a secret ballot.

“I’m honored and humbled by the confidence my colleagues have placed in me to serve as the chair of this revered caucus, the conscience and intellect of the Congress,” Richmond said in a statement, adding how the group looks to make progress on “voting rights, policing and criminal justice reform.”

Richmond’s victory came hours after House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi won re-election. Over Thanksgiving break, Richmond sent a letter to the California Democrat pushing back against her proposed leadership changes, worried that the CBC would lose power.

EPA in a rush to save auto rules from the Trump administration

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Study of fuel efficiency standards was supposed to be done next year, with a final determination in 2018.

11/30/16 2:13 PM

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Trump and the outstate Midwest redraw the partisan lines


Would any other Republican besides President-elect Trump have beaten Hillary Clinton and been elected the 45th president? It’s an interesting question, not susceptible to a definitive answer, but one with consequences for politics going forward.

Last fall I shared the widespread view that Clinton was the only Democrat who could lose to Trump and Trump was the only Republican who could lose to Clinton. Given the fact that elections are a zero-sum game, in which one candidate must win, this view was more an expression of distaste rather than a prophecy.

But it was based also on polling conducted during the spring, before Trump eliminated his remaining Republican opponents in the Indiana primary May 3. National and some state polls showed Marco Rubio running stronger against Clinton than Trump, with John Kasich running even stronger and Ted Cruz a bit better.

This seemed to make sense then. Trump had much higher negatives, especially among white college graduates, who had voted 56-42 percent for Mitt Romney in 2012. Without similar support, how could he hope to win?

We have an answer to that question now. Springtime polls seemed to assume an electorate that looked much like 2012. The signs that Trump would run much better than Romney among non-college whites weren’t very clear, particularly when his controversial comments caused his overall numbers to sag.

Going well into the fall, few polls showed the surge of votes that decided the election in what I have called the outstate Midwest — the counties outside million-plus metropolitan Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio and (sort-of-Midwestern) Pennsylvania, states with 64 electoral votes that went to Barack Obama in 2012 and Trump in 2016.

Those outstate areas trended the same way as Iowa, none of whose 99 counties are in a million-plus metro areas, whose six electoral votes went for Obama and for Trump. There, polls showed Trump opening up a significant lead over Clinton in mid-September.

In Iowa and the outstates, Trump won percentages higher than George W. Bush did in 2004, while Clinton ran far behind Obama’s 2012 showing — 12 points behind in outstate Ohio, 11 points behind in Iowa and outstate Michigan 9 points behind in outstate Wisconsin and 8 points behind in outstate Pennsylvania.

These are all places with many non-college whites and few blacks, Hispanics or Asians. Trump’s stands on trade and immigration — distinctly different from those of other Republicans — were surely partly responsible for his outstate margins, and it seems unlikely another Republican nominee could have matched them.

Gingrich mocks Romney in French accent for 'sucking up' to Trump

Also from the Washington Examiner

“Luckily for [Trump and Priebus], Mitt speaks French fluently. So he could help them with the menu.”

11/30/16 6:15 PM

Two other factors were in play, factors which led to sharp Democratic gains in these same areas in the 1970s. One was honesty: The outstate Midwest recoiled against Richard Nixon’s Republicans in the Watergate years and against Clinton email lawbreaking and lies. That helped Trump, and probably would have helped any other Republican nominee.

The other factor is dovishness. The upper Midwest has long been the most isolationist part of the country. In the 1970s, voters there reacted against Republicans’ support of the Vietnam War. This year, they seem to have moved toward Trump, who opposed military interventions supported by other Republicans. It seems unlikely another Republican nominee could have duplicated this appeal.

So I find myself leaning reluctantly toward the conclusion that no other Republican could have won, at least the way Trump did. Yes, others would have run better with white college graduates, whom Trump carried by only 49-45 percent, and would have run much better among groups with high levels of social connectedness, like Mormons in Utah and Dutch-Americans in metro Grand Rapids.

But Trump saw, or stumbled into taking advantage of, an opening spotted by only a few political analysts — blogger Steve Sailer way back in 2001, RealClearPolitics’ Sean Trende in a 2013 article series, FiveThirtyEight’s Harry Enten in analyzing Republican Joni Ernst’s big Senate win in Iowa in 2014. I made similar observations, but didn’t nail it as they did.

That opening was the fact that Democrats were taking for granted their above-national-average support from non-college Outstate voters in their determination to build a new “ascendant” majority of blacks, Hispanics, single women and millennials. They figured that outstate Obama voters were locked into the Democratic Party and didn’t need any special attention. Turns out they weren’t and they did.

President-elect Trump will be able to text your cell phone soon

Also from the Washington Examiner

It’s part of FEMA’s emergency contact system — not an extension of Trump’s Twitter account.

11/30/16 5:51 PM

So the familiar partisan lines of the past 20 years have been redrawn, and now we have a more downscale Republican Party and a Democratic Party confined to its coastal and campus cocoons. We’ll see how that works out.

EPA in a rush to save auto rules from the Trump administration

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Study of fuel efficiency standards was supposed to be done next year, with a final determination in 2018.

11/30/16 2:13 PM



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Rich Republicans call for not giving a net tax cut to rich people


Mnuchin did say there would be a "big tax cut" for the middle class. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Fresh off announcing that President-elect Trump selected him to serve as secretary of the treasury, Steven Mnuchin said he and Trump would not seek to cut taxes for high-income earners.

“Any reductions we have in upper-income taxes will be offset by less deductions, so that there will be no absolute tax cut for the upper-class,” Mnuchin said on CNBC. For example, he said they’ll cap mortgage interest deductibility.

In other words, rich guys Mnuchin (estimated net worth $40 million) and Trump ($3.7 billion) called for capping government benefits for rich people.

That’s somewhat similar to a famous conservative tax plan proposed by Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, a couple years ago. That plan would have made the mortgage interest deduction on only the first $300,000 of debt. Former Congressman Dave Camp, R-Mich., proposed a similar cap at $500,000.

Mnuchin did say there would be a “big tax cut” for the middle class. He didn’t delve into what the administration’s definitions of upper and middle classes would be.

Jason Russell is the contributors editor for the Washington Examiner.

EPA in a rush to save auto rules from the Trump administration

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Study of fuel efficiency standards was supposed to be done next year, with a final determination in 2018.

11/30/16 2:13 PM

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Romney is already Trump's top diplomat — to GOP skeptics


Donald Trump loyalists have been outspoken about the risks of making Mitt Romney secretary of state, but the last 48 hours have shown how useful the former Massachusetts governor can be to the president-elect.

Romney is already auditioning for the top diplomat’s job by serving as Trump’s ambassador to Republicans who have remained skeptical of the president-elect.

Remember the famous picture of President Obama’s team huddled in the situation room watching the killing of Osama bin Laden? During the campaign, an Internet meme circulated spoofing a similar scene under Trump. It featured a handful of politicians who went all in on Trump early, such as Rudy Giuliani, Chris Christie and Sarah Palin, plus Hulk Hogan, Bruce Willis and Sheriff Joe Arpaio.

Trump’s Cabinet picks so far haven’t looked anything like the circus the meme-makers have imagined. So far, not even Giuliani has cracked the Cabinet line-up (he is believed to be vying with Romney for the secretary of state job). Christie was relieved of his transition team duties. Palin is nowhere to be seen.

Instead we have gotten a fairly normal Republican Cabinet, with people whose policy views can be debated but whose credentials are generally unimpeachable: Tom Price at Health and Human Services, Elaine Chao at Transportation, Betsy DeVos at Education, Jeff Sessions at Justice.

Of those, only Sessions was an early passenger on the Trump Train. The Alabama Republican is arguably the most controversial pick from a liberal perspective, but is highly respected within the GOP. And while questions can be raised about Nikki Haley’s foreign policy experience, the designated ambassador to the United Nations is also popular among Republicans and wasn’t necessarily a Trump enthusiast.

These facts loomed large in Romney’s most public 180 on Trump Tuesday night. “The people he’s selected as members of his Cabinet are solid, effective, capable people,” he said after dinner with the president-elect and incoming White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus. “Some of them I know very well.”

Romney’s remarks were similar to House Speaker Paul Ryan’s the day after the election. Ryan didn’t go as far out on a limb against Trump as Romney, his 2012 running mate. But his frequent criticism suggested he didn’t have a much higher opinion of Trump than Romney did, just more responsibilities to Republican members of Congress representing districts where Trump is popular.

Jill Stein's running mate not a fan of recounts

Also from the Washington Examiner

“It’s a shame the recount has resulted in questions regarding our motives,” Ajamu Baraka tweeted.

11/30/16 5:02 PM

When Ryan spoke after Trump won, he almost sounded as if he was saying, “Maybe this guy knows what he is doing after all.” Romney appears to be entertaining the same thought.

At the very least, Trump’s early Cabinet picks are reassuring to conservatives who hoped he would govern within the Republican mainstream. The assent of GOP leaders like Ryan and Romney is Trump’s reward for doing so. For the Right, the payoff may be letting these Cabinet offices do their jobs, similarly conservative judicial nominees and signing bills passed by the Republican Congress.

“The worst case scenario under Trump,” said a conservative activist, “is George W. Bush with a better immigration policy.” According to this activist, that would mean a Republican administration that was not especially conservative on the size of government but strong on immigration control.

Nominating Price suggests Trump might be serious about Obamacare repeal. Chao was also an under-the-radar conservative reformer during her last Cabinet assignment, secretary of labor under President George W. Bush. “The unsung hero of the Bush administration,” Ed Feulner, then president of the Heritage Foundation, told me at the time. “She’s one of my superstars.”

Romney is sure to be ridiculed for cozying up to Trump. He has a reputation for flip-flopping on issues to improve his chances of wielding power. Trump may be his biggest flip-flop of all. And on issues like abortion, an argument could be made that his past position changes were away from what he needed to say to get elected in liberal Massachusetts to something closer to his personal convictions.

Veterans to defend pipeline protesters from police

Also from the Washington Examiner

“We’re doing this to support our country so let’s do it with honor, working together,” organizers said.

11/30/16 4:45 PM

It will certainly be difficult for Romney to explain away his concerns about Trump’s character, having called him a fraud who flirts with both racism and other men’s wives. But Never Trump was at least partly about whether Trump would govern as a Republican, a set of concerns the president-elect can possibly allay.

Romney’s rapprochement with Trump can be compared to Chao’s husband, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, and fellow Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul going from fierce rivals to allies. McConnell didn’t want Paul to be the Republican senatorial nominee in 2010. But he did want to hold that Senate seat, and when Paul won the primary and seemed serious about winning the general election they put aside their differences.

Similarly, Romney is signaling he is willing to put aside his differences with Trump if the president-elect is serious about governing. This can make other Trump skeptics more willing to work with the administration. Already, former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice is meeting with Vice President-elect Mike Pence.

Never Trump was never very large, but it contained a lot of people with the skills and connections necessary to staff a Republican administration. Trump did not have their services during the campaign. Romney can help him obtain them as president.

Romney was the leader of the GOP’s Never Trump faction. He can now help Trump assimilate it, whether he becomes secretary of state or not.

EPA in a rush to save auto rules from the Trump administration

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Study of fuel efficiency standards was supposed to be done next year, with a final determination in 2018.

11/30/16 2:13 PM



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Jill Stein's running mate not a fan of recounts


Former Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein’s running mate is concerned about how the well-funded effort to initiate recounts in Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania makes their political party look.

“It’s a shame the recount has resulted in questions regarding our motives after waging a powerful campaign against 2 corrupt candidates,” Ajamu Baraka tweeted Wednesday.

The human rights activist came out against Stein’s recount push this week, telling CNN on Tuesday that it “was a potentially dangerous move” because to some people it looks like Stein is fishing for a way to overturn Republican Donald Trump’s Electoral College victory and hand the White House to Democrat Hillary Clinton.

“It would be seen as carrying the water for the Democrats,” Baraka said.

So far, Stein has raised over $6.5 million and has filed for recounts in Wisconsin, Michigan and a selection of precincts in Pennsylvania over the last week.

Stein has defended herself against accusations that she is pulling for an outcome favoring Clinton. Flipping the vote in all three swing states would hand Clinton enough Electoral College votes to defeat Trump. Fueling some pushback this week was news that Clinton’s lawyer has filed a motion Tuesday to join in on the Wisconsin recount effort.

Stein, however, has been resolute in characterizing her recount effort as a way to ensure the integrity of the vote, following reports of “irregularities” in vote counting machines used in each state.

“I believe that Dr. Stein sincerely believed that she had an obligation, grounded in her commitment to the principle of election integrity, to mount a challenge to the results in those three states,” Baraka wrote in a Facebook post this week, adding that “the notion that her decision was made for any other reason than that is a position that I cannot support.”

Veterans to defend pipeline protesters from police

Also from the Washington Examiner

“We’re doing this to support our country so let’s do it with honor, working together,” organizers said.

11/30/16 4:45 PM

While admitting some in the Green Party support Stein’s recount campaign, Baraka said “many” others are opposed to the decision.

“It is unfortunate that after waging a courageous campaign to build an independent, principled political opposition to the two racist, capitalist/imperialist parties,” Baraka wrote, “the recount effort has resulted in serious questions regarding the motivations of the recount that threatens to damage the standing and reputation of the Green party, its supporters, and activists.”

EPA in a rush to save auto rules from the Trump administration

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Study of fuel efficiency standards was supposed to be done next year, with a final determination in 2018.

11/30/16 2:13 PM



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That's *Doctor* Tom Price to you!


Rep. Tom Price has been tapped by President-elect Donald Trump to be the next secretary of Health and Human Services. Price is a six-term Republican from Georgia and one of the most vocal critics of Obamacare. He’s authored and advocated serious replacements for Obamacare for years.

Oh, and I nearly forgot to mention: Price is also an orthopedic surgeon, one of the most difficult and demanding medical specialties there is. In fact, he ran an orthopedic clinic in Atlanta for 20 years before teaching orthopedic surgery as an assistant professor at Emory University.

You’d think these facts would be relevant to journalists reporting and commenting on Price’s new job. After all, the mission of HHS is to “enhance and protect the health and well-being of all Americans.”

But apparently they’re not that important. The same media that haven’t stopped telling us that Barack Obama taught constitutional law don’t seem to think Price’s first career as a surgeon is important enough to mention. Many media stories discussing Price’s new position have either omitted or glossed over his medical background.

The Washington Post’s initial article about Price’s new job waited until paragraph 13 to mention it in passing. A story in the Christian Science Monitor refers to Price as a “Republican surgeon” in the subhead but otherwise doesn’t mention his medical background at all.

Opinion pieces were even worse. During two segments on her Dec. 30 show, MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow didn’t mention that Price’s credentials. Wednesday’s New York Times editorial opposing Price’s nomination neglected to mention it too. Then there was a Daily Beast piece in which the author rails against Price as “a nightmare for women,” because he’d supposedly take away their birth control pills. Of course the author didn’t mention Price’s background.

These are just a few examples.

So do these media outlets think Price’s medical background isn’t relevant to his new job, or could it be that they find his history a little too relevant?

Veterans to defend pipeline protesters from police

Also from the Washington Examiner

“We’re doing this to support our country so let’s do it with honor, working together,” organizers said.

11/30/16 4:45 PM

Perhaps some liberal pundits won’t acknowledge that Price is a physician for the same reason that they don’t like to acknowledge that Ben Carson or Tom Coburn are doctors. It clashes with their prejudices about conservatives and doctors.

For one thing, many liberals just can’t believe that a doctor can be pro-life. But many physicians and other medical professionals take seriously their oath to “first do no harm.” There are 2,500 members of the American Association of Pro-Life Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Meanwhile, the number of doctors willing to perform abortions is dwindling.

And in case you’re wondering, it’s not that the media have something against referring to physicians by “doctor.” Second-Lady Jill Biden, who has a PhD in education, is three times as likely to be called “doctor” in the New York Times than Ben Carson is — even though non-physicians are rarely referred to by honorifics.

Of the 19 Times articles that mentioned Energy Secretary-designate Steven Chu during the Obama transition period, 12 of them referred to him as a “Nobel Prize-winning physicist” or otherwise mentioned his Nobel prize. Perhaps it’ll take winning a Nobel Prize for Price to win the recognition he deserves.

Daniel Allott is deputy commentary editor for the Washington Examiner

Justice Dept. files statement in South Carolina student tossing case

Also from the Washington Examiner

The incident was captured in multiple short video clips that went viral on social media in October 2015.

11/30/16 4:23 PM

EPA in a rush to save auto rules from the Trump administration

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Study of fuel efficiency standards was supposed to be done next year, with a final determination in 2018.

11/30/16 2:13 PM



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Justice Department seeks uniform standards for halfway houses


The Justice Department will be reforming its system of halfway houses, officials announced Wednesday, in an effort to ensure that those who live in them don’t end up in jail again.

Roughly four out of five federal prisoners spend the final months of their sentences in halfway houses before being freed.

Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates announced in a memo that the federal Bureau of Prisons will be overhauling the halfway houses market in an effort to reduce recidivism and help prisoners safely return to society.

The bureau has agreements with 103 contractors to operate 181 facilities nationwide, serving more than 30,000 halfway house residents annually.

The announcement comes just months after the DOJ announced it would be ending its use of private prisons.

“Successful reentry is critical for public safety, and so it is crucial that we get those services right,” Yates said in the memo, adding that the Bureau of Prisons will move to establish uniform standards for all halfway houses.

The BOP will also help ensure all federal prisoners entering halfway houses will be provided with government-issued identification documents, including a Social Security card, a birth certificate and a state-issued photo ID.

The memo also requests that the BOP implement a single, nationwide location-monitoring service. Currently, each halfway house is in charge of implementing its own system for monitoring the whereabouts of residents when they leave.

The Justice Department has been pushing a broader prisoner re-entry program during President Obama’s second term, aiming to reduce the prison population and lower incarceration costs.

Justice Dept. files statement in South Carolina student tossing case

Also from the Washington Examiner

The incident was captured in multiple short video clips that went viral on social media in October 2015.

11/30/16 4:23 PM

EPA in a rush to save auto rules from the Trump administration

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Study of fuel efficiency standards was supposed to be done next year, with a final determination in 2018.

11/30/16 2:13 PM



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White House expands push to boost job applicants with criminal records


The newly added companies include Ben & Jerry's, Clif Bar, CVS Health, Gap, Intel, Kroger, LinkedIn, Monsanto, Perdue Farms, Shinola, Target, Tyson Foods, Union Square Hospitality Group and WeWork. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

The White House on Wednesday announced that more companies have pledged to change the way they evaluate job applicants with criminal records.

The Fair Chance Business Pledge, launched in April, is aimed at eliminating hiring barriers for job applicants with criminal records. With the new round of signatories, the total number of pledged employers is over 300.

The newly added companies include Ben & Jerry’s, Clif Bar, CVS Health, Gap, Intel, Kroger, LinkedIn, Monsanto, Perdue Farms, Shinola, Target, Tyson Foods, Union Square Hospitality Group and WeWork.

According to the White House, there are roughly 70 million people who have a criminal record. By eliminating these barriers to employment, the individuals are given “a fair chance to participate in the American economy.”

EPA in a rush to save auto rules from the Trump administration

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Study of fuel efficiency standards was supposed to be done next year, with a final determination in 2018.

11/30/16 2:13 PM

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Cubs co-owner, whose family spent $5.5 million to defeat Trump, tapped for Commerce spot


Like his Chicago Cubs, the team’s co-owner Todd Ricketts just experienced a historic comeback. During the primary, his family bet big and lost against Donald Trump, to the tune of $5.5 million spent against him. But just as the Cubs came back from a 3-1 deficit to win the World Series in seven games, that defeat has not shaped his fate.

The president-elect just drafted Ricketts for a key role in his cabinet roster. In 2017, the Chicago businessman will head to Washington to work as the Deputy Secretary of Commerce.

That’s a stunning achievement even for Ricketts, the son of the billionaire who founded Ameritrade and the brother of Nebraska’s Republican governor.

When the Ricketts family shelled out $5.5 million to an anti-Trump political action committee during the GOP primary, they earned the ire of the New York businessman. A vindictive Trump threatened to launch an ad campaign against the family, telling the Washington Post in March that he’d show America “what a rotten job they’re doing with the Chicago Cubs.”

Both succeeded. The Cubs went on to 103 wins and their first world championship in 108 years. Trump won 303 electoral votes, and everything’s different. Thanks in part to Ricketts, the Cubbies are national champions and Trump is about to become the 44th president of the United States.

After Trump secured the Republican nomination, Ricketts eventually did an about face. He recharged the Future45 super PAC and reportedly raked in upwards of $30 million for the Republican nominee while his parents donated a million of their own money to pro-Trump groups.

That campaign tryout helped Ricketts win a permanent spot in Trump’s economic lineup. On Wednesday, the incoming executive heaped praise on the billionaire and his boys in blue.

“The incredible job he and the Ricketts family did in the purchase and turnaround of the Chicago Cubs — one perfect step after another, leading to the World Championship, is what I want representing our people,” Trump wrote in a statement. “I am very proud to have him on our team.”

Ricketts’ pick might be … it could be … it is … the most remarkable cabinet comeback in 2016. Holy cow.

Bob Dylan skips White House event for Nobel prize recipients

Also from the Washington Examiner

Dylan was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature on Oct. 13 and has kept a low profile since.

11/30/16 2:24 PM

Philip Wegmann is a commentary writer for the Washington Examiner.

Nancy Pelosi wins re-election, beats back Rust Belt challenger

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Lawmakers made their choice via secret ballot.

11/30/16 11:46 AM



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What comes next for #NeverTrump Republicans


“So, what are you working on?” is a pretty common small-talk question among friends in Washington, D.C. (Yes, we’re horrible stereotypes). This week, a friend of mine that I respect said he’s being considered for a position in the White House in President-elect Trump’s administration. That’s what he’s “working on.”

These same kinds of conversations are happening everywhere. A think-tanker I spoke to said he’s working on “transition stuff.” An issues-based activist said he’s talking with those who will be on executive staff for the agencies he works with.

The dream of the conservative “Never Trump” movement was that the probabilistic forecasters were right, and we wouldn’t have to deal with Trump or his campaign loyalists ever again after Nov. 8. That dream is dead.

Despite disproportionate representation in the media, the “Never Trump” movement was always very, very small. Trump won 90 percent of Republicans in exit polls. That’s a higher percentage of his party than Clinton won of hers, and within the margin of error of what Romney won in 2012. Most Republicans voted for Trump. Even though the “Never Trump” movement is likely overrepresented in Washington’s elite circles, it’s likely that the vast majority of those elite-circle Republicans still voted for Trump.

“Never Trump” conservatives made many arguments, but perhaps chief among them was that Trump is a con artist who hoodwinked conservatives while being completely unprepared for the office that he sought.

Well, he won. We have to hope he is not as unprepared as we judged him to be, and that the scraps of reheated rhetoric he threw to conservatives will be respected now that he sits in the most powerful office in the world. We have to hope our friends and colleagues that we respect who join a Trump administration will be able to exert influence to genuinely do good. We have to hope that the Capitol Hill Republicans that we respected before they threw in with Trump had better judgment than we did, and that Trump will work to make good policy with their help.

Former Bush administration state department official Eliot Cohen discouraged conservatives from working with the incoming Trump team. He’s a “Never Trump” official who says he was open to working with them, but was turned off once he actually began talking to people on the transition team. Perhaps, as Cohen says, Trump staffers are currently so possessed with animosity toward those who worked against them that the well is poisoned. We can only hope that does not continue to be the case.

We’re going to have to work with Trump, his staff, his appointees and those of our colleagues that do join his administration. Whether we work on entitlement reform or international trade or school choice or technology policy, “Never Trump” conservatives are all staring down the barrel of at least four years of Trump in the White House.

In a Hillary Clinton administration, we would have opposed her bad policies and worked with her on good ones. The same should happen with a Trump administration. As much as we would have liked to cover our heads and hide, the world will go on and there is still potential for good policy to be made and good laws to be passed.

Republican senator signals direction of Obamacare repeal

Also from the Washington Examiner

Cassidy is pushing legislation to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

11/30/16 1:53 PM

While I’m not particularly prestigious or experienced enough to be under consideration for an administration position, I won’t be sending my resume to the Trump recruiting website, greatagain.gov. Nonetheless, I do hope the Trump White House gets staffed with Republican policy experts who have a genuine desire to do good and do not share the NeverTrump judgment of Trump’s character and qualifications. If they do, I’ll hope my fellow “Never Trump” colleagues who care about policy continue to work to do good.

The world will go on. We can only hope that we were wrong, and that Trump can be a successful president.

Kevin Glass is a contributor to the Washington Examiner’s Beltway Confidential blog. He is director of outreach and policy at The Franklin Center and was previously managing editor at Townhall. His views here are his own. Thinking of submitting an op-ed to the Washington Examiner? Be sure to read our guidelines on submissions.

Nancy Pelosi wins re-election, beats back Rust Belt challenger

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Lawmakers made their choice via secret ballot.

11/30/16 11:46 AM



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